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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am a long time kayak fisherman. My favorite type of fishing by far is chasing reds and flounder in skinny little creeks.

For a while now I have been wanting a 14-16 foot micro/poling skiff for two man fishing.

It seems like (for the most part) it’s extremely rare to see a micro/poling skiff on the water here in NC and you almost never see them for sale here. When I tell people the boat I want is an Ankona shadowcast 16, they usually respond with “man, you need something with a deeper v hull than that” not seeming to understand that the fishing I want to do is in skinny marshes.

Serious question, is there something I’m missing (like a safety factor) as to why almost no one uses microskiffs here compared to Florida and Texas? I know that the tides shifts are stronger here, but most people I talk to here don’t seem to agree with the practicality of a microskiff and typically advise me against it.
 

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Where are you in NC? I fish out of Brunswick Co. and I know of at least 7 microskiffs in that area. Feel free to PM me.
 

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NC does have a decent amount of marsh, but does not have the extensive flats like FL & TX etc and sometimes you have to cross bigger water to get to the marsh. So a micro is usually a second boat, which many people do not have the money, room or time for. A bay boat will get you access to a lot more fishable water in this area of the world, since there is a bunch of big open water.

Unless you are a fly only person and fish mostly from around Swansboro to Wilmington in the marshes, a micro will not serve you well. Almost everyone I know that got a micro as their only boat, within a year or two went to a larger boat. First time they take a wake over the bow with their wife and/or family on the boat in the inter coastal usually does the trick.

Know multiple guys that have 17’ and under boats, but they are dedicated fly fisherman. Also works if you have a buddy with a larger boat, kind of like a swimming pool, if you don’t want to buy one make sure your neighbor has one.
 

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I fish Bogue sound and I know of three that fish this area. I’ve been wondering the same thing bc I talked to two of the guys and they said their boats did great - even in open water which is my main concern. One is a BT Mosquito and the other a Hells Bay Professional. I’ve been told the Mitzis handle the water pretty good in this area. Similar to you, I’m fishing a kayak in the area where I’d like to take a boat to cover more ground. I have a larger CC to get me around in open water. I’m still up in the air on direction. I’ll figure it out in the next few months and make a purchase. Maybe prices will be close to reasonable by then?
 

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I think it is because they have never been popular in the area and most people have never tried one. The reality is that in VA and the Carolinas there is a lot of water that is only accessible by poling skiffs, and it never gets fished for that reason. I do think it is wise to get something that does decent in open water but can still go shallow such as an 18' class HB, Maverick, or 17' Mitzi on the lower priced end. I just fished my 18' Waterman in the Chesapeake bay this weekend, the only boats around were bay boats that couldn't make it to the creeks I was fishing, so I had it all to myself.
 

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I fish Bogue sound and I know of three that fish this area. I’ve been wondering the same thing bc I talked to two of the guys and they said their boats did great - even in open water which is my main concern. One is a BT Mosquito and the other a Hells Bay Professional. I’ve been told the Mitzis handle the water pretty good in this area. Similar to you, I’m fishing a kayak in the area where I’d like to take a boat to cover more ground. I have a larger CC to get me around in open water. I’m still up in the air on direction. I’ll figure it out in the next few months and make a purchase. Maybe prices will be close to reasonable by then?
The Mosquito and Professional are at the top end of what is considered a micro, 17.5 - 18‘ boats with decent freeboard. OP was asking about 14-16‘ boats, which will typically be more limited as to what water they are comfortable in. Again, doable, but there will be days that it gets sketchy. If I was fishing Bogue Sound north of Broad Creek it would be in my Pathfinder and not my Beavertail. South of Broad Creek towards Swansboro a skiff does well.
 

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Charleston has a ton of marsh, creeks, and backwater to cover that you can explore from some fairly protected ramps. But even still in Charleston, I agree with @Bonesonthebrain that it's not the best option as your only boat. I have a Wigeon 14 back home in FL, just not with me here in Charleston, but it would definitely be usable here for a lot of area. Currently looking for another option has a poling skiff too here in Charleston. But I also have a 21 Sea Hunt that let's me run anywhere in the area and fish in 18" of water. The versatility of the big boat fits the majority of my needs better than a micro would. It just can't pole flooded grass and is a little big to get around some of the smaller creeks on lower tide stages. If I fly fished 95% of the time then it would be a different story, but then again the majority of my needs would be different needs also. It really just depends on what your biggest needs are for the boat.
 

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I think it is one of the best kept secrets in certain parts of NC. There are quite a few micros that fish in the Wilmington-Topsail area, but definitely not a popular option due to the reasons noted above. If you can get past having to plan trips a little more carefully with wind conditions, you can find some of the least hit flats/shallow bays that hold large numbers of less pressured fish.
 

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I fish around Swansboro a lot and have a Microskiff, and have buddies with them. Great boat for that area. Feel free to PM me with questions.
 

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I think there's too much open water to cross once you get north of Swansboro. I'm in Beaufort and am running a 16' flats boat. Lots of days you would think twice about running a small skiff across Newport River, or around the lower Neuse. My dad had a little 14' IPB several years ago. It would get into some tight places, but was not the right boat to run back home when the summertime sea breeze picked up.

Speaking for myself - when the weather is really pretty, I'm probably going offshore on a different boat.
 

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As has been said above- it is the travel on larger river systems that makes use of the smaller skiffs difficult. I have a Mosquito which I pole in the creeks, and though I have had it in the Cape Fear on super flat days, I have also had some unpleasant boat rides. You see a few technical skiffs around, but a lot more bay boats. As they become more and more popular in SC, more will work their way north I suspect.
 

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There are a few around here in NC and I seem to see more and more every time I go out. Biggest problem you’ll encounter is being the lowest(smallest) man on the totem pole. Everyone is launching bay/offshore boats 24’ and larger. And the only speed they operate is at wide ass open on the ICW. Hell, I duck dove a 20’ pontoon once and there was nothing I could’ve done differently to tackle that wake. You definitely need to know your area and how to find protected water without much time out in the open or on the ICW. But, to add to what others have said…. You have to love this style of fishing. We might see a few days a year of clear water to sight fish in and the wind and water is rough almost year long. Yeah I’m jealous of our southern brothers on here with their gin clear, calm waters that you can see 20’ deep.
 

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I run an Ankona Cayenne out of Oak Island. It's not TX/LA, but there's plenty of marsh to explore in that area, particularly behind BHI. Oddly enough, the relatively low numbers of flats skiff was part of my calculus in favor of getting one. Our fish get a lot of pressure, and if I can get to spots that bay boats can't, I should have shots at fish that others don't. I don't have to cover a ton of open water, but I do cross the channel from OKI to Bald Head when the weather cooperates. Prepare to get wet, and navigate strategically. My 15' boston whaler cc handled the chop much better, but couldn't float nearly as shallow as the Cayenne. And yes, navigating the wakes of the big boats in the ICW is annoying, and poling in mud flats is no easy task (particularly when the tide is moving).
 

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I run an Ankona Cayenne out of Oak Island. It's not TX/LA, but there's plenty of marsh to explore in that area, particularly behind BHI. Oddly enough, the relatively low numbers of flats skiff was part of my calculus in favor of getting one. Our fish get a lot of pressure, and if I can get to spots that bay boats can't, I should have shots at fish that others don't. I don't have to cover a ton of open water, but I do cross the channel from OKI to Bald Head when the weather cooperates. Prepare to get wet, and navigate strategically. My 15' boston whaler cc handled the chop much better, but couldn't float nearly as shallow as the Cayenne. And yes, navigating the wakes of the big boats in the ICW is annoying, and poling in mud flats is no easy task (particularly when the tide is moving).
Have you had the privilege of spotting those elusive silver giants behind OKI?
 

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I am a long time kayak fisherman. My favorite type of fishing by far is chasing reds and flounder in skinny little creeks.

For a while now I have been wanting a 14-16 foot micro/poling skiff for two man fishing.

It seems like (for the most part) it’s extremely rare to see a micro/poling skiff on the water here in NC and you almost never see them for sale here. When I tell people the boat I want is an Ankona shadowcast 16, they usually respond with “man, you need something with a deeper v hull than that” not seeming to understand that the fishing I want to do is in skinny marshes.

Serious question, is there something I’m missing (like a safety factor) as to why almost no one uses microskiffs here compared to Florida and Texas? I know that the tides shifts are stronger here, but most people I talk to here don’t seem to agree with the practicality of a microskiff and typically advise me against it.
You might also want to consider a 17’ Ankona Native. I’ve run mine for 9 summers up in the Chesapeake Bay Area and Eastern shore barrier islands. It handles surprisingly well in the rough stuff as long as you pay attention and take your time when the sea breeze kicks up. I’ve poled mine into creeks I could barely turn around in. I rarely miss having a bay boat.
 

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Took my 14' Lagoon Skiff Tail Chaser (Similar to a skimmer skiff 14... but better) 50 miles round trip from Beaufort to Cape lookout this weekend. Crossed 2 inlets with a small craft advisory expiring on Saturday as well. Took some monster chop with 2 people and 2 small dogs, coolers, gear fuel etc and never had a single wave come over the bow. Check out my post from this morning with pic. I absolutely love the boat, I'm not going to take it oceanside unless it is a dead calm day however and I think that's where a lot of people get hung up. Know the limitations of the rig but also know just how capable these small boats can be!
 
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