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I made wooden rod holders for a wooden skiff a few years back. Sealed with epoxy then varnished. The woodwork looked nice, but was constant work.
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Boiled linseed oil will work. Need to apply once a year. It can promote mold. A hard finish superior to a standard spar finish is Sikkens Cetol marine finishes with UV inhibitors and a breathable product- original Sikkens TGL if you can find it was excellent with iron oxide microscopic particles as UV reflectors worked extremely well on mahogany for a long lasting finish. The Cetol Marine by Sikkens is latest evolved product.
 

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I’ve seen clear non skid on top of teak I was wondering the product and application involved if anyone knows. Also some sort of adhesive to attach mahogany rod holders to gunnel of boat.
Boiled linseed oil will work. Need to apply once a year. It can promote mold. A hard finish superior to a standard spar finish is Sikkens Cetol marine finishes with UV inhibitors and a breathable product- original Sikkens TGL if you can find it was excellent with iron oxide microscopic particles as UV reflectors worked extremely well on mahogany for a long lasting finish. The Cetol Marine by Sikkens is latest evolved product.
African Mahogany. 2 coats of epoxy, than a few coats of Captains 1015 varnish 4 years ago. Boat is kept in garage, so no long term sun exposure. Attached with 5200, on bottom, top, and sides. Zero movement, that stuff is incredibly strong, but there's also 3 attachment points, and zero flex in the hull sides or floor, which could make all the difference.
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Panhandler
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Used Bristol stain finish for years on my Bayshore. Two-part epoxy that can be applied in multiple coats over a day. Lots of sanding involved, but when it's done, it's gorgeous.
 

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Years ago I used mahogany to build instrument panels and rodholders for two or three skiffs.. On my old SeaCraft we used five quarters mahogany for the vertical rodholders (six on a side) attached to the center console - and the same five quarters stock for the horizontal rod holders.. We also installed a great big louvered teakwood door on the console. All we used back then was polyurethane varnish, five or six coats for the mahogany - carefully lightly sanded between coats for a gorgeous finish... That big teakwood door was oiled.... Here's a pic of that old SeaCraft....

work in progress

ready to fish - note the custom built livewell boxes at the stern.
It never had a seat in it - I was a lot younger then....
Having lived with the high maintenance involved I swore that I'd never go down that road again... and subsequent rigs had little or no brightwork at all.... Much as I like the look of wood on a skiff going to starboard and similar products for trim and accessories was a very smart choice - but then I'm much more a user of boats - and my gear does get used as much as possible so brightwork ? Not for this guy...
 
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