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Hi all,

new here and have questions in what size trim tabs to go with. My boat is a 16’ flats approx 80” wide (widest part of deck) and wondering what size trim tabs most are running on flats type boats in the 16-18’ range. I read you want 1” in width per foot length of boat but bennet electric come in either 12” or 18” (I have room for the 18” if I need to go this route). Also, any advice on whether I should go with 9” or 4” depth tabs? Is there a big difference in going to less depth tabs?

I appreciate any guidance

rob
 

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I had 9x12” Lencos on my aluminum hull and they were fine. Are you stuck on Bennetts for some reason? I’ve never had issues with Lenco unless it was my wiring issue.
 

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I'm pretty sure that Bennett hydraulic tabs come as small as 9" widths (9x12)... You might give them a call and find out if they can do 9" wide electrics... Over the years I've found Bennett to be very, very responsive to customer requests...
 

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12 by 12 should be plenty of tab for the boat you described. That's what a lot of people are using on most of the Conchfish builds on here.
 

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I had 9x12” Lencos on my aluminum hull and they were fine. Are you stuck on Bennetts for some reason? I’ve never had issues with Lenco unless it was my wiring issue.
12 x 9 Bennett Tabs seem to be the right dimensions according to their sizing chart. I have owned Bennett hydraulic tabs in the past, and now have Lenco electrics on my current skiff. I have had zero problems with my Lenco tabs. However, now that Bennett offers the Bolt electrics, I will go with Bennett on the next skiff, for only one reason. I like the way the Bennett actuator bracket is welded to the trim plane, so the entire bottom surface in contact with the water is smooth and virtually drag-free. The Lenco trim planes are attached to the actuator with machine screws drilled through the plate, where 3 large screw heads disrupt the flow of water on the bottom surface of the trim plane and create additional drag. Just me, but every bit of hydrodynamic efficiency and speed counts on a skiff that's rigged for light weight with minimal horsepower.
 
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