Dedicated To The Smallest Of Skiffs banner

41 - 60 of 238 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
364 Posts
I may never own a high end skiff but I do enjoy learning more about the thought process and technology of how these boats are built. Thanks to the OP for the pics and information. If you are in the market for one of these skiffs visit one of the shops and see how they are built it is very educational. I've been to Hell's Bay and East Cape and it was time well spent.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
The other thing that separates beyond the build process is the hull footprint in the water. Honestly the build process is a secondary consideration for me. How the fish was my primary consideration. They are dead quite and push less displacement wake than other similar sized/comparable skiffs. You do not hear hull slap when you are quartering or staked out with the stern into the waves. It is truly amazing.

When you run your hand over the entry you can feel the design in the hull and how it is designed to make the boat as quiet as possible. There is a little wave at the entry that you do not necessarily notice right away.

I have one complaint but I think that is owner error so far. I am still trying to figure out the occasional misty spray that I get in a strong quartering wind. I was not able to do the full hands on with George as the day I picked it up was the day the state closed so I am still figuring out the ins and outs of running the skiff. My old skiff was like driving a minivan compared to the Chittum.

For fishing Tampa Bay and anywhere where you deal with big confused sea like Charlotte Harbor or Key West I cannot imagine a better skiff. If I was fishing the Lagoon or Choko primarily my opinion may differ.
I am hoping you have trim tabs! If so, use them to list the windward side up a little and that should allow the spray rail to do it’s job! The driest of the driest can still get moist in a quartering sea with a little wind! And don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
It is all different by where someone can sit or stand. Then how much weight is in the craft. Also it doesnt have to float level as we think but not sink if certain weight is added. Its just complicated is all. Not a one size fits all.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
The other thing that separates beyond the build process is the hull footprint in the water. Honestly the build process is a secondary consideration for me. How the fish was my primary consideration. They are dead quite and push less displacement wake than other similar sized/comparable skiffs. You do not hear hull slap when you are quartering or staked out with the stern into the waves. It is truly amazing.

When you run your hand over the entry you can feel the design in the hull and how it is designed to make the boat as quiet as possible. There is a little wave at the entry that you do not necessarily notice right away.

I have one complaint but I think that is owner error so far. I am still trying to figure out the occasional misty spray that I get in a strong quartering wind. I was not able to do the full hands on with George as the day I picked it up was the day the state closed so I am still figuring out the ins and outs of running the skiff. My old skiff was like driving a minivan compared to the Chittum.

For fishing Tampa Bay and anywhere where you deal with big confused sea like Charlotte Harbor or Key West I cannot imagine a better skiff. If I was fishing the Lagoon or Choko primarily my opinion may differ.
Hi @Jason M

Agree fishing is more important than the how the boats are made. They fish well because the way their built. The minimal displacement wake / hull footprint are a direct result of the very light weight of the Chittum Mangrove and hence the build process. Chittum Mangrove builds are uniquely light for an 18 foot skiff and fish very well.

Running rough chop (higher than freeboard) in quartering winds will get you wet in any boat. It’s a matter of how wet. The spray rails help a lot. Trimming the bow up and raising the windward side with tabs, as James said, help too. Another question: are you running fast enough and riding on top9of the chop as much as possible?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
409 Posts
Hi @Jason M

Agree fishing is more important than the how the boats are made. They fish well because the way their built. The minimal displacement wake / hull footprint are a direct result of the very light weight of the Mangrove and hence the build process. Mangroves are uniquely light for an 18 foot skiff and fish very well.

Running rough chop (higher than freeboard) in quartering winds will get you wet in any boat. It’s a matter of how wet. The spray rails help a lot. Trimming the bow up and raising the windward side with tabs, as James said, help too.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Hal and George are not transparent about the build process and they have a history of over promise and under deliver. Not many, if any buyers post pics of the build process of their hulls. There will be lots of variability in the build quality with all the different lay up options offered. Why? Proprietary process? I think the design build material suits the 12 degree much better than the flat bottom for serious use. Also, Chittum skiff owners, or any other brand users, will not be forthcoming about the negative experiences with the brands they are dropping serious coin on. I think the jury is still out on longterm durability and customer service, warranty issues. What is the hull warranty? Does it matter?
Such snidely BS. All of you guys: REST ASSURED THAT IF THERE IS A PROBLEM WITH MY BOAT YALL WILL KNOW ABOUT IT. Same as with my Professional. That thing was a total pig for weight, got called out for that. It was a beautiful boat, got complimented on that. Hull warranty: of course it matters. I will look in my paperwork and post the terms. Just drove 22 hours straight from Stuart FL to Corpus Christi TX. And have some stuff to do. Get BMT weighed, pay taxes for TPWD, go pick up push pole, sign docs, full day of stuff and dead tired from the drive. I have a bunch of images but need post processing first. There are quite a few examples of anecdotal evidence of these hulls being seriously abused and surviving just fine. Why would the build process and laminating schedule suit a 12* hull moreso than a 2*? More BS. Fanboys or not, it would behoove anyone to actually research in-depth the particular argument prior to reporting a bunch of nonsense.

Now I will launch my LM2 for the first time tomorrow and start engine breakin. I am vastly more concerned about the Tohatsu than I am the 100% carbon fiber hull. Finally, both Hal and George were 100% transparent with me on every stage of applying their proprietary lamination schedule. 100% transparent. So stop it with the BS. This shit infuriates me no matter what boat company is involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Not sure I even understand a statement about someone not being transparent about revealing a proprietary lamination schedule. Unless you have a non-disclosure agreement with them, they do not have to reveal squat about a proprietary design. Kind of like being pissed off at KFC because they will not give you their recipe.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
Such snidely BS. All of you guys: REST ASSURED THAT IF THERE IS A PROBLEM WITH MY BOAT YALL WILL KNOW ABOUT IT. Same as with my Professional. That thing was a total pig for weight, got called out for that. It was a beautiful boat, got complimented on that. Hull warranty: of course it matters. I will look in my paperwork and post the terms. Just drove 22 hours straight from Stuart FL to Corpus Christi TX. And have some stuff to do. Get BMT weighed, pay taxes for TPWD, go pick up push pole, sign docs, full day of stuff and dead tired from the drive. I have a bunch of images but need post processing first. There are quite a few examples of anecdotal evidence of these hulls being seriously abused and surviving just fine. Why would the build process and laminating schedule suit a 12* hull moreso than a 2*? More BS. Fanboys or not, it would behoove anyone to actually research in-depth the particular argument prior to reporting a bunch of nonsense.

Now I will launch my LM2 for the first time tomorrow and start engine breakin. I am vastly more concerned about the Tohatsu than I am the 100% carbon fiber hull. Finally, both Hal and George were 100% transparent with me on every stage of applying their proprietary lamination schedule. 100% transparent. So stop it with the BS. This shit infuriates me no matter what boat company is involved.
On the build process and lamination schedule thing... I am sure they use a different lamination schedule from a 12* to the 2*, that is like engineering 101 a first year student would know! And remember, I’m just a Homosassa dummy! 😎

You are dead on, all just fanboy stuff! Don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t mind having a 98/99 Whipray. I’ve no use for a new one though. Enjoy the Chittum!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
Not sure I even understand a statement about someone not being transparent about revealing a proprietary lamination schedule. Unless you have a non-disclosure agreement with them, they do not have to reveal squat about a proprietary design. Kind of like being pissed off at KFC because they will not give you their recipe.
Exactly, and the average consumer wouldn’t have a clue what they were looking at anyway!
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
They actually do customize the schedules per application. Hal told me if I ever wanted to order a 21 and put a 300 on the stern (have no idea why in the world someone would do such a thing) they would build the boat to absolutely handle the weight and power.

Now if a guy told them he would run a 50 and then decides to hang a 150 on it, there are going to be issues there. A little common sense can go a long way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
Yes, yes... please do.

Well, I’ll go ahead and name a few that are above and beyond the coast guard standards for flotation foam...

Carolina skiff J series, Sundance skiff, Boston whaler, and old sears hull I had when I was a kid, pro lines... shall we continue?

Donzi, sunbird, ranger, triton, stratos...
😎
I think he's confused with longer than 20'
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
211 Posts
Not sure I even understand a statement about someone not being transparent about revealing a proprietary lamination schedule. Unless you have a non-disclosure agreement with them, they do not have to reveal squat about a proprietary design. Kind of like being pissed off at KFC because they will not give you their recipe.
100% agree! Goofy thinking transparent and revealing are words or actions used in any proprietary process demonstrates a lack of knowledge of the meaning of the word proprietary!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Hi @Jason M

Agree fishing is more important than the how the boats are made. They fish well because the way their built. The minimal displacement wake / hull footprint are a direct result of the very light weight of the Chittum Mangrove and hence the build process. Chittum Mangrove builds are uniquely light for an 18 foot skiff and fish very well.

Running rough chop (higher than freeboard) in quartering winds will get you wet in any boat. It’s a matter of how wet. The spray rails help a lot. Trimming the bow up and raising the windward side with tabs, as James said, help too. Another question: are you running fast enough and riding on top9of the chop as much as possible?
I agree with you and you are right. I just don't know the ins and outs of other manufacturers process and materials that I cannot comment intelligently about it. Beyond carbon and glass that's about as much as I know. I've never studied skiff building.

Hal and Georgie were great with me. I just showed up one day unannounced at the factory.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,319 Posts
At the end of the day, what does any average buyer really know about composites engineering or construction other than a little “and I mean little” info they can get off the www and what the salesman tells them? I know there are some engineers out there but at the end of the day... the consumer typically has to trust that the builder knows what they are doing! Not a bad thing, same goes for the auto industry really.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
751 Posts
Discussion Starter #57 (Edited)
Hal and George are not transparent about the build process and they have a history of over promise and under deliver. Not many, if any buyers post pics of the build process of their hulls. There will be lots of variability in the build quality with all the different lay up options offered. Why? Proprietary process? I think the design build material suits the 12 degree much better than the flat bottom for serious use. Also, Chittum skiff owners, or any other brand users, will not be forthcoming about the negative experiences with the brands they are dropping serious coin on. I think the jury is still out on longterm durability and customer service, warranty issues. What is the hull warranty? Does it matter?
Hey Steven @sjrobin ,

You’re great at hunting fish and poling a skiff ...but.... your remarks have a lot of mis information....

151708


151707


I seriously doubt a builder could be more revealing than the extensive step by step photos which Chittum has posted on IG and I reposted on this thread. If there’s only 1 IG repost everyone should see, it’s the 3rd one on the first post showing Chittum’s steps in one shot infusion on the hull.

Of the 4 I’ve owned, 3 were prototypes or the first of a kind Carbon Race Boat (1st 100% carbon build), LM2 1st 100% carbon 2 degree,12 degree Mangrove prototype (originally a tiller- converted to center console). All 3 of these boats are my favorites for their application— all have held up under serious use.

I get a text every month from the 2nd owner of my LM1 tunnel... he raves. Just yesterday:

“Just fished the LM hard for five days. Hands down the easiest poling skiff made! ... People just don’t understand the difference...”

@sjrobin, your comment: “There will be lots of variability in the build quality with all the different lay up options offered.” The base Snake Bight layup has been around since 2009. The Snake Bight Performance has been in development since the first “widow maker” was built in 2013 for Thane Morgan & Dustin Huff, later owned bu Nathaniel Linville (that boat is at the Chittum factory for sale with Evinrude 175 — no stress cracks after 7 years running 50-60 mph). The Mangrove / LM2 builds began in the summer of 2018... to me these are the most exciting boats given their super light weight and strong performance with lighter outboards. *** The common denominator of all Chittums since 2009 is 100% infusion— hulls, parts liner & deck... these are very strong boats. The first 2 posts on this thread demonstrate their infusion mastery.

Your remark: “Hal and George .... have a history of over promise and under deliver.” @sjrobin - you said that to me in 2017! ... I got my 2 new builds 2017& 2018 on time. I believe they’re on hull 149 from the Palm City facility.

Let’s get out on the water soon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Hi @Jason M

Agree fishing is more important than the how the boats are made. They fish well because the way their built. The minimal displacement wake / hull footprint are a direct result of the very light weight of the Chittum Mangrove and hence the build process. Chittum Mangrove builds are uniquely light for an 18 foot skiff and fish very well.

Running rough chop (higher than freeboard) in quartering winds will get you wet in any boat. It’s a matter of how wet. The spray rails help a lot. Trimming the bow up and raising the windward side with tabs, as James said, help too. Another question: are you running fast enough and riding on top9of the chop as much as possible?
To your question on riding on top. This is the thing that's been hardest for me to adjust to moving from my old skiff. 15 years of running the old one and I have to make myself push that throttle and ride on top when it gets nasty. My Silver King would not let you do that.

For what it's worth. If I'm a manufacturer I wouldn't give any of my proprietary info away either. Either they bought that or figured it out. That can't be a complaint.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Another thing that is not widely advertised is: when visiting with George on many technical ideas, some opposing, he is really a wealth of information. George told me I should really consider getting a steel galvanized RamLin trailer. he said it would tow much better, be more forgiving for road harshness. So I surprised him and ordered a galvanized with Gatorskin white coating on everything. I love that trailer. It tows like a dream. Very attractive too. Point being that if a person is willing to utilize good solid input they will likely be very happy with the end result.

They are there to bounce ideas off of and there has been a ton of correspondence back and forth during the planning and building phases. Just invaluable. This has been a learning experience for me for sure.
 
41 - 60 of 238 Posts
Top