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quality craft mid 60's boat believe made in miami.
I built these in Melbourne/Palm Bay for Sea Fury in late 60s early 70s. We designed and built our own boats there I was a mold specialist. Several other Cos took our boats and popped molds and changed something so they couldn't be charged steeling the design. we called them try hull runabouts some we fitted wit walk through windshields and decks. I built 1 for me it was the baby poop yellow.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
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I built these in Melbourne/Palm Bay for Sea Fury in late 60s early 70s. We designed and built our own boats there I was a mold specialist. Several other Cos took our boats and popped molds and changed something so they couldn't be charged steeling the design. we called them try hull runabouts some we fitted wit walk through windshields and decks. I built 1 for me it was the baby poop yellow.
Thanks for the info
 

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Back then there were several basic hull designs - a tri-hull (as shown above) and a different design, originally the Squall King I believe that was a dry riding mono hull... and all of them being built by many different manufacturers - each with a tiny variation in hull design to keep from getting sued for copying someone else's product...

All were built to sell to the family boating market - and most of them very heavy (those early glass boats could be dropped from twenty feet off the ground without getting much more than cosmetic damage as a result...). Over the years as they changed hands and one or two manufacturers began to figure out ways to improve those early hulls (making them lighter, stronger, etc.). When better materials came along - that's when things really began to take off in the world of small craft... All of this was years and years before the very first Hells Bay was built...

The guy who taught me what little I know about working with glass was Bill Aman - who started out as an apprentice in the old Challenger plant... Still quite a few of his old hulls around years later....
 

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When I was a youngster, 60's era we, family, had a 17' tri-hull similar to that design... all I can say is the ride at cruising speed, (crossing B-Bay to Elliott for example), in any chop beat the hell out of ya.
 

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I have a 19' Thunderbird that looks about like it. As noted above, very stable while sitting fishing. Reasonably dry in a chop, but yes they pound. A deep V would pound less, but would roll while sitting fishing. You have to always give up one thing for the other.
 

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MFG made a similar hull, but much lighter than my Thunderbird. I originally bought a 17' from my Father, and then bought a 16' just like it, just a little shorter. I have yet to float the 16 footer, but the 17 would go light, operator only, about 47mph with 115 hp Mercury Tower of Power. My friend and I would call it the offshore racing boat, because it was surprising how much chop it would take wide open. Later years I put a 50hp on it and it went ok but no where near the 47 of the 115. (I had placed my 115 on my 15' Starcraft and visa versa) I had a couple of friends pass me headed down the reach into the bay and east wind, but when we hit the choppy water, I never let up as the old MFG skipped atop the waves and they slowed to a crawl. If you want a dry choppy water boat and you see one of these cheap or free, grab it, it is well worth repairing. Here is a googled picture of the boat. Don't expect no skinny water though. It will take about knee depth water just to float it.
mfg.jpg
 
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