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BBA Counselor
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7,230 Posts
That's a very broad question. Maybe post up a lot more info. Like what you are wetsanding? Why are you wet sanding it? What coating is it?.....pics help too
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
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1,820 Posts
The top two things you need are sandpaper and wet. Good questions from firecat to help us help you with the details :D
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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207 Posts
There was a really good thread about this a year or two ago in the boat yard basics section. With some digging using the search function I’m sure it’s easily discoverable
 

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Registered
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Please make a point of doing a bit of research before getting started... once you’re sure about what you intend to accomplish all I ever needed was wet or dry sandpaper, a hard rubber sanding block and a small water bucket. For my purposes I started at 220 grit paper, then 400, and ended with 600 grit.

Hope this helps

Aren’t boats fun?
 

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BBA Counselor
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7,230 Posts
I agree with Boatbrains here, that looks like a lot more damage then just a light oxidization. You might be looking at a full paint job. Which can be about the same work as wet sanding and buffing, just a bit more money.
 

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Before you take our word for it... make a point of finding a decent fiberglass shop ( or shop that paints over fiberglass...) and ask them to look at that hull... As noted it may be time for a paint job - but only an up close inspection will tell the tale. Water sanding out a faded or discolored hull is feasible (and if you do it by hand the way I did a baby SeaCraft all those years ago... a lot of work) - and still more to do after you get tired the first day.... since gel coat is usually thick enough to allow you to remove the entire surface - and still leave new looking gelcoat in place... The trick with water sanding is to be very careful with corners or any sharp edges or angles... These kinds of places allow you to remove too much gelcoat (another of those "ask me how I know" moments...) allowing the fiberglass to show through.... not good!

At any rate if you can, get a pro to give it a look. You might be able to water sand that old hull out - or it might really need to be properly sanded, prepped and painted... Either way it will mean work on your part (or money...).

Good luck and post up a pic which ever way you go...
 

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Panhandler
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2,716 Posts
Please make a point of doing a bit of research before getting started... once you’re sure about what you intend to accomplish all I ever needed was wet or dry sandpaper, a hard rubber sanding block and a small water bucket. For my purposes I started at 220 grit paper, then 400, and ended with 600 grit.

Hope this helps

Aren’t boats fun?
During the 13 years I owned my Bayshore custom flats boat I re-did the teak 3 times. After taping and brushing on multiple coats of Bristol finish in a single day before letting it dry for several days, I starting wet sanding with 400 grit before graduating to 600, 800, 1000 and 1,200. By hand. Toe rail, helm pod and platform toe rails. After that it was hours and hours of polishing using 3M Finessee It compound. By hand. Yes boats are fun. I also ate a lot of fried chicken and drank a ton of beers in the process.

Braden123, paint it and go fishing. ;)

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