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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read an email.
For immediate release: Dec. 12, 2019

Suggested Tweet: Spotted #seatrout rule changes approved by @MyFWC: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/FLFFWCC/bulletins/271263f #Florida #Fishing #FWC2019

FWC approves changes to spotted seatrout rules

At its meeting in Panama City Beach, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved several rule changes for spotted seatrout. Spotted seatrout are one of Florida’s most popular inshore fisheries. Based on the results of a recent stock assessment and after hearing concerns from anglers, FWC worked with stakeholders to create a suite of regulatory changes that would benefit the spotted seatrout as well as continue to provide quality fishing opportunities.

The following rules will go into effect Feb. 1, 2020:

  • Creating two new zones by splitting the Northwest spotted seatrout management zone into the: (See maps below.)
    • Western Panhandle (Escambia County through the portions of Gulf County west of longitude 85 degrees, 13.76 minutes but NOT including Indian Pass/Indian Lagoon).
    • Big Bend (remaining portion of Gulf County plus Indian Lagoon, and Franklin County through Fred Howard Park Causeway in Pinellas County).
  • Creating the renamed South Florida zone (Fred Howard Park Causeway in Pinellas County near the Pasco County line through Broward County) and Central East zone (Palm Beach through Volusia counties) by moving the boundary between the southern management zones. (See maps below.)
  • Reducing bag limits
    • Western Panhandle: five to three fish.
    • Big Bend: no change (remains five fish).
    • South Florida: four to three fish.
    • Central East: four to two fish.
    • Northeast: six to five fish.
  • Modifying the recreational slot size limit from 15-to-20 inches to 15-to-19 inches total length.
  • Allowing one seatrout over 19 inches per vessel (currently per harvester).
  • Prohibiting captain and crew from keeping a bag limit on a for-hire trip.
  • Re-establishing the February recreational closure in the Western Panhandle zone and the November-December recreational closure in the Central East zone.
  • Reducing the current daily commercial limits to 50 per harvester and 100 per vessel.
  • Removing an unnecessary commercial reporting form.
Learn more about spotted seatrout by visiting MyFWC.com/Marine and clicking on “Recreational Regulations” and “Spotted Seatrout.”


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Newly-approved spotted seatrout management zones, effective Feb. 1, 2020.



New boundary between the Western Panhandle and Big Bend spotted seatrout management zones effective Feb. 1, 2020.
 

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I Love Skinny Water
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So you can keep 50 trout? That sounds excessive
 

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I guess I don’t get why so many people get upset about limit changes. Does anyone, beside the commercial fishermen, need fish flesh make ends meet?

Are the majority of people in it for the groceries or the recreation?

Many sport fishermen here in Texas went completely nuts when TP&W recently lowered the speckled trout take from 10 to 5 on the upper coast. They have vowed to sell their $70k+ boats because it just isn’t worth it anymore with lowered limits. Huh? Tens of thousands in boats, fuel, and gear, those are some mighty expensive fillets even if you could keep 50 fish.

The fun is in the finding and the catching. Conservative limits just help insure plenty of fish to find and catch for the future and future generations. What’s not to like about that?
 

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It's all for not anyway if your in the red tide effected area of the summer of 2018 because you can't keep them still along with redfish or snook.
 

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History maybe. The gov also can’t seem to fix anything. They just allow. Forget it. This could go on forever. The real answer can be seen on Lonestar law show. All those illegal fish. Had to be real, it’s on TV
I think most of the people that do the research are pretty good and try to do the right thing. Things get political as it moves up the line.
 

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I guess I don’t get why so many people get upset about limit changes. Does anyone, beside the commercial fishermen, need fish flesh make ends meet?

Are the majority of people in it for the groceries or the recreation?

Many sport fishermen here in Texas went completely nuts when TP&W recently lowered the speckled trout take from 10 to 5 on the upper coast. They have vowed to sell their $70k+ boats because it just isn’t worth it anymore with lowered limits. Huh? Tens of thousands in boats, fuel, and gear, those are some mighty expensive fillets even if you could keep 50 fish.

The fun is in the finding and the catching. Conservative limits just help insure plenty of fish to find and catch for the future and future generations. What’s not to like about that?
Amen brother!
 

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Panhandler
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Some good improvements, but the commission yielded to a few loudmouth guides in the Big Bend. Still like the no guide/crew retention and lower size limits. Wished they would have implemented another winter closure in the Big Bend when the trout stack up in the rivers. But at least the new rules will help the stocks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I’m not complaining or praising. Just reporting. It won’t stop those that didn’t follow the last set of rules. Soon you will have to serve Gortons finest for a fish fry. Maybe not even that. I think the cod fisheries is also shut down or close to it. Give it another 10 years and all the wood pulp/plant cellulose farms producing fake meat will pollute the water enough to create 0 take.
 

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How do you know the research is shitty?
Would you survey a bunch of toddlers in preschool about gun laws? That’s basically how they got their numbers for more flounder restrictions. They surveyed people that don’t even target them and used gill nets.
 

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I know many areas of Florida needed the more restrictive trout rules - particularly areas hit by those terrible red tides... Down along the Everglades we have been doing just fine with no red tides and good healthy trout stocks so the new restrictions were not needed but that’s the way it goes I guess. There will be days when we’ll actually have trouble finding trout small enough to keep...
 

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I am all for not keeping fish. I 100 PERCENT AGREE WITH KARSTOPO, not to mention a few years of drawn down limits can really bring a fishery back. Up here people will catch as many brook trout as possible and keep them all and say they are invasive and your like, man, there is nothing else here, is it ok we like to fish for them or do you have to just kill everything. They literally sell fresh caught trout at the store for like 8 bucks.
 

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TPWD does gill nets surveys every year in Texas. These surveys are used to set the limits for saltwater species, but if they get a hold of a picture taken in Louisiana of five guys in a boat with limits of 24"+ trout, they will change the limits and regulations here in Texas the following year. That's how it is done in Texas, so please do not post those kind of pictures. LOL
 

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I am all for not keeping fish. I 100 PERCENT AGREE WITH KARSTOPO, not to mention a few years of drawn down limits can really bring a fishery back. Up here people will catch as many brook trout as possible and keep them all and say they are invasive and your like, man, there is nothing else here, is it ok we like to fish for them or do you have to just kill everything. They literally sell fresh caught trout at the store for like 8 bucks.
Invasive? HaHa I could be wrong but aren’t Brookies the only native species of trout in the US? I know in Georgia and most of Appalachia that’s the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
I am all for not keeping fish. I 100 PERCENT AGREE WITH KARSTOPO, not to mention a few years of drawn down limits can really bring a fishery back. Up here people will catch as many brook trout as possible and keep them all and say they are invasive and your like, man, there is nothing else here, is it ok we like to fish for them or do you have to just kill everything. They literally sell fresh caught trout at the store for like 8 bucks.
Hopefully that’s your own belief and not one you would impose on others. Again we do not solve the problem, just apply a bandaid.
We are not eating the seatrout in numbers that can’t be sustained. Its the environment. Same with cod. The warming trend is the issue for the cod. But I suppose you have to impose limits if the species is in decline. I’m a believer in solutions.
 
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