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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about connecting the front and back decks on my banshee to be able to walk around. I ordered the marine ply, thought it might look cool to bond a teak veneer (whole thing or just accent strip), and seal with clear epoxy w/non skid additive.
Am i asking for issues with the veneer delaminating?
 

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One thing to think about is the epoxy must be kept from ultra-violet light. Ordinarily this is done with marine varnish on small boats or kayaks. I always both prime and paint any epoxy work. I have seen a teak and holly decorative deck inside a cabin boat. It was likely never coated with epoxy.

Best regards,
Frank_S
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've seen uv stable epoxies, usually used for coating bartops/tables, etc. I figured this is what was used on the higher end marine woodwork like fighting chairs.
 

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Polyester Compatible Epoxy
UV Resistant

A clear, UV-resistant, almost water-white high modulus, epoxy resin system. Especially formulated for use in building and repairing sail and surf boards over polystyrene cores. It can also be used for coating and laminating. Unlike many epoxy resins, SB-112 will cure to a clear, glossy, blush-free surface. SB-112 is unique in that polyester resins and gel coats may be bonded to it without the use of “tie-coats”. The only preparation required is sanding immediately prior to applying the polyester product. The minimum temperature for coating is 55°F. The pot life time at 60°F is 50 minutes and the set time is 8 hours. The pot life time at 77°F is 30 minutes and the set time is 4 hours.
http://www.mertons.com/Epoxy/epoxy_resins/sb.html

Use epoxy to apply the veneer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My plan was to bond the veneer with epoxy in a 4x8 sheet, roll out any voids and clamp. Then seal later after cutting and fitting.
Would prob build a small console the same way if it works out. The ply/veneer layup is about 1/10 the cost and time of solid construction ($3/sq ft vs $30).
 

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Brandon, FL
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You are better off building out the boat the way you want it and then add the veneer. You, as a backyard wood worker, will probably not achieve a good bond for a piece that big.

Dry fit all your pieces, remove, coat both pieces (structural pieces and veneer) with epoxy then use saran wrap as your clamp. Might need some tape to hold the ends of the saran wrap so it won't come undone. Pull the wrap tight so it slightly stretches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Veneering after / in place is a good idea. Okume showed up today. I ran it through a widebelt sander to 150 grit to smooth and level. I'm starting tomorrow and will take some pics. I figure worst case if it looks like shiz, i will paint it.
 

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I like the saran wrap idea too but I'm wondering if the center would lift, maybe I'm not picturing it right.

if you wanted to do a full sheet couldn't you lay your plywood/veneer lamination on a flat floor/driveway and lay visgueen and another sheet of ply on top of and pile on some weight to clamp them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've used shrink film for "clamping" odd shapes among other things...they sell at Lowes. For this, I have lots of traditional clamps and access to a membrane press (work at a custom cabinet shop). I'm not too worried about the veneer bond, i guess i was just thinking through combining furnature construction with boat building chemistry.
 

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Brandon, FL
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Yes it can be glued after but it is more difficult and much easier to get a hump. Not much sanding will take you through the veneer.

Shrink wrap also works but the heat will severely thin the glue and may break down the chemistry of the epoxy (I have never tried this approach).
 
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