Dedicated To The Smallest Of Skiffs banner

Transom questions and concerns beavertail b2

637 Views 7 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  whoislang
Motor vehicle Wood Floor Vehicle door Gas

Motor vehicle Office equipment Office supplies Gas Machine

Gas Machine Electrical wiring Engineering Wire

Automotive design Grey Hood Material property Tints and shades


Recently picked up a 06 beavertail b2 for a really good price. There are cracks on the transom. My question are is it safe to run in current condition and what a repair would cost for something like this. New to boating and skiffs. Any info helps Thanks.

Attachments

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
‘07 B2
Joined
·
272 Posts
I too have gel coat stress cracks on the transom’s front facing side. My understanding is that those are cosmetic only and most B2’s have them. I can’t comment on the rear facing cracks you showed but would have those inspected/repaired ASAP if it were me.
 

· Registered
2006 b2 beavertail
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yea that's what I was planning on doing. I did some more research and seems that the part that is cracking is an insert the goes over the transom but not the actual transom itself. But definitely going to get it looked at.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
273 Posts
First of all, having had t do a major stringer repair, what you are showing wouldn't scare me. It may or may not need to be addressed, but if it does, it's a pretty straight forward job.

Here's what I'd do - get a buddy to come over and tilt the engine up about halfway. Have your buddy put pressure up and down on the lower unit while you watch the cracked area for movement.

If these are just gel coat cracks, you won't see the area flex much and the gap/crack won't get much wider. Keep in mind that gelcoat doesn't flex and can crack simply because it is applied too thick or because the area under it flexes more than the gelcoat can allow, but the flexing is normal for the fiberglass underneath.

If you have a serious problem, you will see those cracks widen when your buddy puts pressure on the engine. As you have your buddy do this, keep in mind how much pressure that engine is creating when you are running (downward pressure from your buddy) and how much pressure would be applied if you go hard aground at a moderate speed. Increase your pressure each way slowly until you roughly match that level of force.

I would DEFINITELY use this time to explore the rest of the hull for cracks. Look around chines, lifting strakes, areas under stringers, etc. Get a camera and video everything as you go, take pictures. Later, these can be useful comparison points to see if any cracks you find are growing.

This thread may help you know what to look for - this is probably worst case scenerio and I learned a lot.

In your case, I would say you can sleep well. Unless you find a bunch of other major cracks, you probably don't have an issue at all, and if you do, it's a simple thing to have fixed since it can be done from the outside and without removing decks.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top