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Just thought I pass this on. Years ago got tired of all the problems with trailer wiring and salt water. Decided to do what aircraft manufacturers do....pott the splices. In other words, encase the splices where no salt can get to them. To do this....everywhere there is a splice, encase it in hot glue. Hot glue is cheap, and easy to use, and it slows the corrosion down. Nothing completely stops saltwater, but if you replace splices....coat them fully with hot glue.
I used to have light issues all the time...and considered it part of saltwater fishing, but since encasing my wire splices in hot glue....haven’t had a trailer light issue in 3 years.
Give it a shot....it works, its cheap, and its easy. Hope this helps
 

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I would never use solder on any trailer or boat... Soldered joints can't flex the way some splices need to in hard use - instead they crack.... You might want to check out what ABYC has to say about soldered joints for wiring in boat rigging...

Krash has it right - the fewer splices the better, use tinned copper wire if possible to sealed heat shrink covered wire ends, for good results... and lastly make a real deal of looking for chafing points on any trailer where wiring can rub against sharp edges. I've had more trouble with abrasion breaking down wiring insulation on trailer wiring -than any thing else... but then I'm on the road towing enough to log 20,000 plus miles a year - every year...
 

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I do heatshrink crimp connectors. Then dip the connection in liquid neoprene. But I like your tip and would use it if I did not have liquid neoprene on hand.
 

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Heat shrink butt splices, covered with liquid electrical tape.

Also, since grounding is a common trailer light problem, I take all ground wires all the way to the front on the trailer, use a heat shrink ring terminal and bolt it to the trailer near the receiver.

Finally, but one of those $2.99 trailer light connector testers at Harbor Freigt - at least when you start to diagnose a light issue you can confirm your truck is giving out the right juice
 

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The best thing I did was replacing all the cheap trailer wire with Accon Marine Tinned wire. The tinned wire will last years compared to the typical trailer harness wire. And I know in that ABYC standards do not recommend soldered connections in boats, but I solder my trailer light connections, use shrink tubing over them and LED lights. Once and done for several years.
 

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I'm gonna raise this post from the dead. I have a float on trailer and my brown wire for my back right tail light has a corrosion spot behind one of the splices. They use Spliseal to make their connections, had to Google it to find out what it was. Basically is a plastic mold kit that fits over splices and seals them. I thought it was pretty neat, it's applied with a hot glue gun that feeds the plastic through like a glue stick. Has anyone ever messed with this kit?
The hot glue idea sounds pretty nice and significantly cheaper than the kit (100 bucks for the most basic kit). Do you use any kind of mold for the hot glue or just ensure you cover the entire connection? Thanks guys.
 

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Thanks man, that was my original plan. The hot glue method sounds pretty interesting though. I understand nothing will ever be perfect especially when we're subjecting these things to saltwater.
 

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Oh yeah, and as mentioned earlier, abrasion an UV damage to the wire coatings. I change the whole schmeal out when it looks like I have more fixes than wire...I'm about there right now.
 

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I like the little hat shaped crimp connectors that take both wires into the same connection. Crimp them together HARD - make your forearms bulge - then fill the "hat" with silicone or hot melt. Be careful with the hot melt - it can melt the insulating plastic. Wiggle the wires around while doing that to make sure they're fully coated.

I've worked on many wiring problems in many applications for many people and the single most common mistake I've seen is where people put the wire into a crimp connector, squeeze it a bit with pliers and call it good. Very often, the wire will literally fall out of the connector. Crimp the hell out of it with a proper crimping tool - mash it.
 

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I agree with the needing to crimp the hell out of the wires into whatever connector you choose to use. I'll give the glue under the heat shrink idea a try. I've always just used a heat shrink connector with dielectric grease and then and additional sleeve of heat shrink over the top of it.
 
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