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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Excuse me while I rant. It'll make me feel better and it's cheaper than a psychiatrist. :D
Trailer rollers and why they can cause a great deal of physical and emotional distress.


1) Cadmium plated fasteners are not y'er friend. So why would anyone use it on a trailer
that will be used anywhere near salt water? Why I ask you? My abraded knuckles,
bruised arms, strained muscles and shoulders want to know?

2) Cadmium plated roller shafts are not y'er friends either, along with their little buddies, pal nuts.
Do you know what happens when salt water is even in the same time zone as those parts?
I left valued pieces of my dermis on the garage floor, along with varying amounts of blood,
this weekend while rehabilitating an old Continental trailer.
I think rust may be a better adhesive than epoxy.

3) Black rubber rollers should not be installed on a trailer, ever, for any boat that will be used more than once.
They disintegrate under load and are not designed to last.
The middle of the roller has a substantially larger inside diameter than the outside of the shaft,
which means it holds water in contact with the shaft, accelerates corrosion and does not
allow the roller to do what it is intended to do, roll easily. Instead it splits allowing more water
and oxygen to make contact with the shaft causing even more corrosion.
The only rollers that should ever be used are the gold polyurethanes with the stainless steel cores
and stainless steel shafts which will actually support the keel and roll as intended,
making launch and retrieval of a hull so much less stressful.

On the bright side, the trailer rehab is done.
My only worry now is how long it'll take before I'm healed up enough to go fishing? ;)
 

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'04 HB Devilray Merc 25 HP
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It's easier when done in smaller steps, and possibly wearing gloves?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gloves? Maybe...didn't help it was 100% humidity and 100° F in the garage.
Only had a day to get it done, then make the 6 hour drive back home.
Kids, part of the fine print when you say "I do" reads "you are required to assist them when asked politely".

I operate under ******* rules which state:

The only way you can tell how much fun y'er having, is by the amount of blood you leave on what y'er doing.

I musta had a great time. :D
 

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Me? I bring a sawzall whenever I have trailer work to do... That and a good pair of work gloves will keep the bleeding to a manageable level.

Of course it took more than thirty years to learn that some things are just better when cut away and replaced.
 

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If I didn’t come home from work w / a nick ,my folks would think I skipped work and went fishing. Skin getting so thin , I can rub up on shrubs mowing, looks like I’ve been in a cat fight. St Upid. Patron saint of dumb asses. I agree w Bob , trailer work requires electric torch. Don’t mash nothing you need...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
wait till middle of the winter.

Now ya' tell me....


My kid picked up a 16 foot Key Largo with a 60 hp Etech.
Naturally I got volunteered to inspect, detect and correct all the problems.
Wasn't any thing major, just typical wear and tear and corrosion,
to be expected on a used boat/trailer.
Solid hull, surprised by how strong it was built.
Ideal for the area where my kid lives, Destin, out in the Florida panhandle.
The Key Largo is a nice bay boat for chasing reds, black drum, trout, sheepshead and flounder.
 

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If you go day after day (and log more than 20,000 miles a year towing...), waiting for winter doesn't happen ... My current sawzall is a corded model - my dream is to one day have a good battery powered one (only have one Bosch battery powered tool - but I will have more.... really like the one I have) - for those days when my workshop for trailer stuff - is the nearest boat ramp...

My go to hammer - is something called an engineer's hammer (looks like a baby sledge...).
 

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Excuse me while I rant. It'll make me feel better and it's cheaper than a psychiatrist. :D
Trailer rollers and why they can cause a great deal of physical and emotional distress.


1) Cadmium plated fasteners are not y'er friend. So why would anyone use it on a trailer
that will be used anywhere near salt water? Why I ask you? My abraded knuckles,
bruised arms, strained muscles and shoulders want to know?

2) Cadmium plated roller shafts are not y'er friends either, along with their little buddies, pal nuts.
Do you know what happens when salt water is even in the same time zone as those parts?
I left valued pieces of my dermis on the garage floor, along with varying amounts of blood,
this weekend while rehabilitating an old Continental trailer.
I think rust may be a better adhesive than epoxy.

3) Black rubber rollers should not be installed on a trailer, ever, for any boat that will be used more than once.
They disintegrate under load and are not designed to last.
The middle of the roller has a substantially larger inside diameter than the outside of the shaft,
which means it holds water in contact with the shaft, accelerates corrosion and does not
allow the roller to do what it is intended to do, roll easily. Instead it splits allowing more water
and oxygen to make contact with the shaft causing even more corrosion.
The only rollers that should ever be used are the gold polyurethanes with the stainless steel cores
and stainless steel shafts which will actually support the keel and roll as intended,
making launch and retrieval of a hull so much less stressful.

On the bright side, the trailer rehab is done.
My only worry now is how long it'll take before I'm healed up enough to go fishing? ;)
Sounds brutal!
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
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2,001 Posts
Excuse me while I rant. It'll make me feel better and it's cheaper than a psychiatrist. :D
Trailer rollers and why they can cause a great deal of physical and emotional distress.


1) Cadmium plated fasteners are not y'er friend. So why would anyone use it on a trailer
that will be used anywhere near salt water? Why I ask you? My abraded knuckles,
bruised arms, strained muscles and shoulders want to know?

2) Cadmium plated roller shafts are not y'er friends either, along with their little buddies, pal nuts.
Do you know what happens when salt water is even in the same time zone as those parts?
I left valued pieces of my dermis on the garage floor, along with varying amounts of blood,
this weekend while rehabilitating an old Continental trailer.
I think rust may be a better adhesive than epoxy.

3) Black rubber rollers should not be installed on a trailer, ever, for any boat that will be used more than once.
They disintegrate under load and are not designed to last.
The middle of the roller has a substantially larger inside diameter than the outside of the shaft,
which means it holds water in contact with the shaft, accelerates corrosion and does not
allow the roller to do what it is intended to do, roll easily. Instead it splits allowing more water
and oxygen to make contact with the shaft causing even more corrosion.
The only rollers that should ever be used are the gold polyurethanes with the stainless steel cores
and stainless steel shafts which will actually support the keel and roll as intended,
making launch and retrieval of a hull so much less stressful.

On the bright side, the trailer rehab is done.
My only worry now is how long it'll take before I'm healed up enough to go fishing? ;)
Don't feel too bad as my mechanic friend will trade me his mechanic time for me to repair trailers for him
 
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