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Discussion Starter #1
not sure if this has been discussed before here but in my constant search for learning, I came across a leader construction that while keeping the ratio fairly similar between butt/mid section and tippet, has a different approach to connecting the tippet to the mid section than the blood knot. On each end, it is made by creating a loop and doing a double surgeon on that loop. Then it is a loop to loop connection between each end. The cons are bulkier knots than blood knot but on the plus side, you can change tippet really quickly and have flies/tippet prepare as well.

Any experience in using this approach?
 

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I use the loop to loop all the time when I am fishing IGFA tippet classes. When I break the tippet I can easily change out the tippet/shock tippet and get back to fishing. It is very difficult to tie knots in 4 lbs tippet let alone in a rocking skiff. If you are not fishing IGFA then I am not sure if there is and advantage to using loops; in these cases I usually use a heavy tippet that will not break on a fish.

Mike
 

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I use a loop-to-loop connection to my tippet for the most part. I use perfection loops. The advantage is I get more tippet changes out of a leader before I have to reconstruct the leader (I build my own). But eventually the loop gets heavily creased and compromised in some way and has to be re-tied. After a couple of replacement loops I just use a blood knot, knowing I’m going to re-build or replace the leader with the next tippet change.

Similarly, on some of my lines I have replaced the worn-out end loop with a needle knot, which of course is a much smoother connection than a loop-to-loop connection between fly line and 40-50-60-lb mono. In that case I connect the mid section to the butt with a loop-to-loop since the needle knot is so tedious to tie and I want that butt to last awhile. On the downside, loops are hinges and want to stick in guides. On those days that I end up with a line/leader setup that is free of any loop-to-loop connections it’s quite pleasant not having those loops....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I use a loop-to-loop connection to my tippet for the most part. I use perfection loops. The advantage is I get more tippet changes out of a leader before I have to reconstruct the leader (I build my own). But eventually the loop gets heavily creased and compromised in some way and has to be re-tied. After a couple of replacement loops I just use a blood knot, knowing I’m going to re-build or replace the leader with the next tippet change.

Similarly, on some of my lines I have replaced the worn-out end loop with a needle knot, which of course is a much smoother connection than a loop-to-loop connection between fly line and 40-50-60-lb mono. In that case I connect the mid section to the butt with a loop-to-loop since the needle knot is so tedious to tie and I want that butt to last awhile. On the downside, loops are hinges and want to stick in guides. On those days that I end up with a line/leader setup that is free of any loop-to-loop connections it’s quite pleasant not having those loops....
Thanks for the feedback! I would agree that over time these loops get worn out. But I don't seem to keep my leaders long enough. Somehow I find myself changing them quite often due to abrasion, nicks, stress due to the tension created during a fight or simple wind not that are gotten pretty tight (I do these too much still unfortunately). I change them often time to err on the side of not getting into trouble rather than truly needing it .
 

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I just started using dual perfection loops to add my tippets...makes it easier to step down to 12# when the fish spook away from 16#. I was a little concerned that the extra knots would be too visible or weak but it didn't seem to bother my first red of 2019, caught wading on a neg low in clean water. Based on that success...I'm going to continue...
 

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I also use a loop to loop to connect my leader to tippet. As others have mentioned - changing to a lighter tippet, or replacing is much quicker. It also preserves the leader itself, whether you tie your own or buy them. The leader section also stays the same length until you throw it away, which helps casting. Before I used this method, I'd end up with a 5 foot leader and 4 foot tippet, which made delivery of the fly difficult. Also - a loop knot on the end of a piece of tippet is quick and easy to tie.
 

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I like the ease of loop to loop on the bite, but the reason for 12# FC bite is to reduce the profile of the bite leader and let the fly work it's magic. A lot of the time it doen't make a difference if the larger loop to loop grass catching profile is used on the bite, but I don't take the chance and if the leader gets too short, pick up another one of the five fly rods in the skiff rack. Red drum, sheepshead, and sea trout can be very difficult to fool in clear shallow water.
 
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