Steering Cable Lubrication

Discussion in 'Outboard Maintenance' started by Live4Reds, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. Live4Reds

    Live4Reds I Love microskiff.com!

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    Hey folks.  I've got a newly acquired skiff with a 1998 Johnson 60 outboard and am curious about properly lubricating the steering cable.

    Typically, I would purchase a Steersman guard and pump grease through it's zerk, but the threads on the port side of the outboard are shot.  Picture attached.

    Is my only option to disassemble the cable and grease regularly? Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    How did the port side threads get chewed off the tilt tube? :-?

    Can you re-thread the end of the tube?
     

  3. cutrunner

    cutrunner Cert. Yamaha technician

    Thats a weird lookin johnson.. Lol
    Im probably gonna regret saying that prior sentence... :-/
     
  4. Live4Reds

    Live4Reds I Love microskiff.com!

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    I have no idea how the threads got so chewed up honestly. The guy i bought it from used this boat to inshore charter and he's the original owner so it's seen a lot of hours on the water. May just be oxidation over the years.

    There is still some decent looking thread on the bottom side, but i'm nervous about trying to re-thread...the top is thin enough that it may just give when i put torque on it.
     
  5. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Seeing that much corrosion on the end I'd expect to find the same throughout.
    Might be time to replace the tilt tube before it becomes a real nasty project.
     
  6. Live4Reds

    Live4Reds I Love microskiff.com!

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    I think you might be right.  Any advice or resources to help out a DIY'er?  And if this is beyond something i should tackle, how much would a repair like this cost? Thanks!
     
  7. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    It's an afternoon project with the right tools and a minimum of complications.
    Looks to be part 47 in the linked diagram, you need to shop for a best price.

    http://www.crowleymarine.com/johnson-evinrude/parts/52595.cfm

    Remove the steering cable from the tube.
    Remove the end nut from one side.
    Support the outboard with a hoist from the block lift strap. (part 99 in the next diagram)

    http://www.crowleymarine.com/johnson-evinrude/parts/52579.cfm

    Remove the old tube from the brackets. (the hard part due to corrosion)
    Install new tube, and end nuts, lube well.
    Install steering cable and new steersman nut.
     
  8. mmjamp

    mmjamp I Love microskiff.com!

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    Yeah that's the picture that I saw over in the for sale section, It needs to be replaced for sure! Be careful tackling this job yourself.  I’m not saying it can’t be done but if it’s that rusted you might find yourself needing a set of torches and a big hammer to get it all apart looks like it was never washed with fresh water after use to me; which can make for a headache if things start to break. Good luck
     
  9. Live4Reds

    Live4Reds I Love microskiff.com!

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    Thanks for all of the input. I think I'm going to take it in to be changed.

    Does anyone know of any good johnson technicians in the Mobile Al area?

    In regard to it never being flushed with fresh water, I'm honestly not sure how well it was mainted from a rust prevention / cosmetic standpoint. It was an inshore charter boat for 10 years, so it has spent a TON of time on the water...but you pop the cowling off and the motor looks absolutely brand new. The corrosion on the tilt tube (and some on the tiller arm) are the only noticable issues I have found! I'll take it for a boat this old and "broken in"! ;)
     
  10. Creek Runner

    Creek Runner Well-Known Member

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    Sorry wasn't meaning that it wasn't a good engine, heck I work on a ton of commercial, tournament, and charters guys boat's and they all may not be pretty but they sure do run good.  Yeah the steering tube, Steering arm, and tilt & trim always show the most rust.