So who here has a kayak?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SClay115, Oct 15, 2010.

  1. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    I seem to notice this with folks who own smaller boats, that a few of them tend to have a yak or two. Well, I am considering picking one up, as it might be nice to just simply to put it on the roof, and get out there. My skiff is stored off property, and it's a bit of an ordeal to go fetch it, prep it, and be ready to go at a moments notice, while I don't entirely mind, but it would be nice to have an alternative method at home to use when I just feel like being out there.

    So, do you have one? If so, which? And, are your reasons similar to my thoughts?

    Steve
     
  2. skinny_water

    skinny_water Well-Known Member

    Solo trips are great in a kayak. If you are just going out to fish a tide for a couple hours by yourself it's hard to beat. I paddle a Ocean Kayak Prowler 13. It has tons of dry storage and is the correct length for everyday paddling. I stand up paddle and fly fish out of mine. I wouldn't recommend that to anyone that doesn't have 8/10 for balance.

    My next one, (and the most fishing friendly one) will be a Native Ultimate 14.5. It's really a plastic Canoe that they call a kayak with a better bottom for stability.

    http://www.nativewatercraft.com/ult_14.cfm

    You can also get it with a trolling motor or peddle power, but that is really limited for +1ft of water. So thats out of the question for me.
     

  3. Caretaker

    Caretaker Well-Known Member

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    I have a couple of boats plus a kayak - the Emotion Grand Slam.  I have also owned yaks from Ocean Kayak and A pair of Hobie Outbacks.  Choosing a kayak depends on your style of fishing and your personal tastes/needs.  Other options for something small are the American Eagle Canoes which you can hang a 2-5 hp outboard on or the 13' or 15'4" Gheenoes.   Lots of options out there.
     
  4. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    I like my canoes, a little roomier than a yak, but only for calm waters... ;)
     
  5. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    I own four kayaks! The reason being is my original purchase, a Kestrel 140 Sit In, was meant for fishing. However, I learned that the paddling out of a kayak is more fun than the fishing out of a kayak, so it was off to buy a touring boat! I ended up with a P&H Capella 166, a classic british design touring boat. Then, as luck would have it, I won a Pheniox 120 from Hurricane kayaks (a nice 12' SOT) in a kayak-a-thon. Next came the river boat for doing smaller river and florida spring.

    In short, I've got a couple  ;D

    I personally didn't enjoy fishing out of my Sit In boat, or kayak fish the Everglades flats. The problem was that to get to a decent fishing spot could be 5 miles out. Once you start heading to a spot that's 3+ miles away, you're commited for the day. If you get there and there's nothing there, I hope you enjoyed the work-out. Now I know there are other areas where the kayak fishing is better, for instance The Canaveral Sea Shore where the distances to different types of habitates aren't to bad so that you don't get skunked.

    My recomendation would be to look into the Freedom Hawk kayak (http://freedomhawkkayaks.com/). They are really cool!

    I used to work part time at a kayak shop, so if you have any additional questions just PM me!

    Charlie
     
  6. kdhs10

    kdhs10 Well-Known Member

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    At the moment I only have a kayak, :'(. Malibu Stealth 14.
     
  7. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    That was on my list of ones to look at. I have heard great things about them! And the storage looks incredible. Also into the fact that it is a SIT, and would be a fair bit easier to get back into after swamping it.

    Skinny, I looked into those Natives, they look great, and people love them, but if you haven't already, look into getting back into those things after swamping it. Granted, they are much more stable than others, and they DO float once full of water, but just barely. I don't know much more about these things than what I read, and I have read they are very difficult to get back into out in open water. A few people mentioned something about an old Boy Scout procedure that involves some fancy handiwork pertaining to flipping the boat(canoe) upside down, and then quickly flipping it back over as to avoid water collecting into it again. Sounds tricky with a 60 pound hull in open water.

    Not trying to bad mouth them, as I know they are outrageously stable, but it is just something to look into. I have been trying to do a ton of research on them, and when I learned about the differences between a sit in yak vs. a sit on top, I had to try and find the pros and cons of both. And the general idea I gather is that with a SOT boat, you can literally just flip it over, and pull the plugs and it should self bail. Is that correct?

    I have been thinking about it more and more, and I almost think that I would end up using a kayak more than the skiff. Love the boat, and it is mostly routine now, but having to get the boat and car ready to tow is just a pain sometimes. Whether it be idiots at the ramp, or boat troubles, just seems like it would be easier with nothing really to go wrong(mechanically speaking that is). You guys ever feel like this?

    Steve
     
  8. Caretaker

    Caretaker Well-Known Member

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    Not to be negative, but a fully rigged and loaded boat form the garage is easier to launch than a kayak. For me, the boats in the garage with everything except the days food already inside and ready to go.

    Taking the yak means loading it on the racks, putting everything in the truck, and unloading and assembly at the launch. Lots of lifting and unloading involved.

    There are certainly places where the boat ramp is a PITA, but sometimes that's where I would launch the yak anyway, so the same problems often exist.

    Yaking is just a different experience. There are times when it is great and times when I'd rather be in a boat. It's nice to have the options.
     
  9. kdhs10

    kdhs10 Well-Known Member

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    That pretty much sums it up right there.
     
  10. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    Unfortunately, my boat is not in my garage, but stored off property. So if I don't make time the day before to retrieve the boat, it becomes a bit of an ordeal to get onto the water in a rapid fashion. As all of my "boat gear" still needs to be loaded into the boat. If it was stored at my place, it would make my life 1000% easier.

    But I understand what you folks are saying about the kayak just being a different experience. And I can definitely see that.

    Steve
     
  11. Gramps

    Gramps Living &amp; Dying in 3/4 Time

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    I don't have a kayak currently, but have owned an Ocean Kayak Scupper Pro & a Heritage Redfish 14. The Scupper was a good boat; light, fast & fairly stable. For $450 ready to fish it was a great deal. But the Redfish was by far my favorite. It was a more stable boat, drier, better rigged for fishing, amazing seat (same as Native Watercraft), but holy crap was it heavy! Only complaint was throwing it on the car after a day of fishing.

    If I could find a redfish 12 for a good price, my garage would definitely be its new home.
     
  12. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    I would NOT pull the plug. Usually the plug is for water INSIDE the actual structure of the boat. To get that water out you need to be on dry land, otherwise you're going to be swimming back home :eek:

    For a SOT kayak they are basically all self draining. They use scuppers, little holes inthe bottom of the boat, to let water out. Sit ins are a little hard when first getting started, but you learn quick and it becomes second nature.

    As for canoes.....I did a training course to get my BCU two star (British Canoe Union) certification and in order to do that we need to show proficiency in a Sit In boat and a Canoe. Cockpit boats are easy since I do so much touring, canoes...not so much. The paddling is easy and the stability is nice, but one flip, are a pain in the A$$! But in shallow water they are great and alot of fun, and tipping isn't a problem cause you just step back into the boat ;D
     
  13. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    Maybe I was using the wrong terms. Or don't have a firm understanding on how the SOT's are put together. I assumed that there was a hollow shell, and you sit on top of that, and the scuppers would drain the cockpit. I meant scuppers when I said plugs, just a term mistake I suppose. I didn't even realize there were other plugs on the SOT's.

    So is that the correct procedure? Flip and pull the scuppers? Or am I still off base?

    Steve
     
  14. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    Nope , you got it right. Sorry about going all technical on you  ;D

    I thought you were talking about the small plug at the stern of most SOT kayaks. Since the boat is a hollow shell, some water eventually gets into the boat. So there is a small plug that gets unscrewed to let water drain out of the boat.

    There is nothing much to a kayak in reality!

    I thought of another boat besides the freedome hawks (which I still think are the coolest fishing boat). The Hurricane Pheniox series. Actually, all of their SOTs are nice. They use TCS (or they refer to it as Tylon I believe) These used to be one of our hot sellers at the shop. The reason is that TCS is a cheeper alternative to fiberglass. Ultimatly fiberglass is the best boat material, because it can always be repaired, whereas rotomolded boat are a pain. TCS is kind like one step up from roto boats. It's lighter, more ridgid, had a higher abrasion ressitance, and looks much cooler  :cool: I would def look into Hurricane Kayaks before buying (http://hurricaneaquasports.com/)!
     
  15. skinny_water

    skinny_water Well-Known Member

    Worked for Capt Jon Bull and I today...

    9lb tagged redfish. He has a shirt on the way!
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  16. oysterbreath

    oysterbreath Well-Known Member

    I currently own 2 kayaks (scupper pro and RMT Tango), a flats stalker, a boot leg stand up paddle board, and no boat. Once I get the boat I plan to sell all of my crap and buy either a OK trident 11 or tarpon 120. The reason, I enjoy fly fishing small creeks and rivers. I'll use the short yak for water I can't or don't want to do from a boat.

    I will admit that currently, sometimes I take the scupper pro out just to paddle it around. If I see fish I cast but I just enjoy the work out. Last time out I paddled the scupper 12 miles. I probably only cast my fly rod 40 times durring the trip.
     
  17. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    That is exactly what happened to me! I starting paddling more than I fished, and the next  thing I knew I was doing overnighters with 15+ mile days average. Now I'm doing the wilderness trail this thanksgiving  :eek:
     
  18. oysterbreath

    oysterbreath Well-Known Member

    That actually sounds like fun. I'm trying hard not to have too many TOYS but it's hard. I want a boat but think it prudent to get ride of a few other large items before my wife cries foul! lol I do want a touring kayak but....that's one-too-many toys! lol
     
  19. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    If you ever want to try one out, just let me know! I'm sure we could figure something out, and I'm always looking for extra people to join me on paddles ;D
     
  20. Amsoil_Man

    Amsoil_Man I Love microskiff.com!, And it Loves me back!

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    I am glad you started this thread. I recently had this same problem and finally decided it was time to buy. Now I'm a kayak owner and couldn't be any happier. Definitely shop around... You can save a heck of alot of money. If you want to see for yourself I have a link on my signature that has the current "Kayak Build". Fully ridged kayaks may look golden at first but they aren't.

    When you buy definitely hit me up, I'll go paddling with some new friends.