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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1997 198v carolina skiff. Currently running a 50hp elpto merc dry weight 240lbs.
I have a group 31 battery on my left rear corner and a 6 gal tank on the right rear corner. I have the opportunity to get a 90hp mariner 2stroke. 310lbs dry weight. I am wanting to go a 12 gal tank still in the rear right side. Will the extra 60 lbs of fuel and another 70 lbs of motor be to much on the rear of the boat?
 

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Hull balance is important.
If it doesn't float level at rest,
it will cause handling problems on plane.
Bow heavy causes plowing.
Stern heavy creates severe drag and loss of efficiency.
Leaning to one side or the other causes steering problems.
With the boat in the water at the dock
look at how it is floating.
Bow high is not good.
Bow low is not good.
Port or starboard incline is not good.
The hull needs to be level in the water.
Fit your components into the hull so as to balance it properly.
That also includes the operator and passengers.
 

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Why a group 31 size battery? That is a big battery. Defined move the batts forward. Whatever set up you decide to run, try to keep weight out of the ends and as reasonably possible close to the centerline. Then balance the boat as needed for weight the ends and off center
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Picked up new agm batteries at a junkyard for 30 each
Why a group 31 size battery? That is a big battery. Defined move the batts forward. Whatever set up you decide to run, try to keep weight out of the ends and as reasonably possible close to the centerline. Then balance the boat as needed for weight the ends and off center
 

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Brett is right on the money... What we used to do is take a new hull to the ramp and float it - then add batteries, fuel tanks, and all the other stuff you just can't live without - moving it all around until your rig floats as level as possible (if it's not level you're not able to get in the shallowest water possible since one end or other is dragging). When that hull is level you've got it where it will float in the skinniest waters (not to mention it will behave better when you're running..).

Just think for a moment about the boats we fish out of... Do your best to find the lightest weight, best built rig possible - then load it down with everything short of the kitchen sink.... Now add two or three people.... and I won't mention that ice chest or bait well - it all adds up and really has an impact on your hull's performance...
 
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