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I am definitely not a technical glass person but any chance you can elaborate on one vs the other. thanks man
There is enough reading on this to keep you busy for a long time and google can provide a better answer than me so I'l refer you there. I don't pretend to be a composites expert, boat builder, or even a one-off CF16 builder, but it's generally accepted that polyester is less desirable than vinylester, and vinylester is less desirable than expoxy.

Cliff notes... polyester is more prone to water absorption and blistering and offers no strength to the lamination. Vinylester is is a hybrid of polyester and epoxy and offers much better waterproofing properties and better bonding to materials. Epoxy is completely waterproof and adds strength.

I don't know of any of what I believe to be high quality boats using polyester resin below the waterline and if at all. With the little resin needed in a small skiff as it is, and with a TPS being so weight critical both in terms of overall weight and balance, and with foam cores... I would just prefer to have an epoxy or vinylester boat. Epoxy cost alot of money, vinylester should not add that more money to the build of a small skiff.

When I scraped the gelcoat off the lower front keel area on my boat years ago loading it on a trailer with a keel roller that not set-up correctly. I remember the both builder and the shop that repaired it (before I knew how) telling me it was only a cosmetic issue because my boat was all vinylester resin. Apparently the polyester based gelcoat provides little defense to water absorption but the vinylester lamination prevents it from becoming a problem. So if that's the case, why would I want a polyester resin boat below the waterline? That's my thinking anyway.

Speculating at SS costs... SS will sell you an unrigged hull for $10,000 and vinylester requires no more labor than polyester. Assuming 50% markup over cost, how much of that $5,000 material cost do you think is resin? Now, assume vinylester is double the price of polyester... what are we talkig here... a few hundred dollars? maybe $1500? $2000? It's worth it to me.

Hell... I wish they do it in all epoxy and shoot it with paint for a price.
 

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There is enough reading on this to keep you busy for a long time and google can provide a better answer than me so I'l refer you there. I don't pretend to be a composites expert, boat builder, or even a one-off CF16 builder, but it's generally accepted that polyester is less desirable than vinylester, and vinylester is less desirable than expoxy.

Cliff notes... polyester is more prone to water absorption and blistering and offers no strength to the lamination. Vinylester is is a hybrid of polyester and epoxy and offers much better waterproofing properties and better bonding to materials. Epoxy is completely waterproof and adds strength.

I don't know of any of what I believe to be high quality boats using polyester resin below the waterline and if at all. With the little resin needed in a small skiff as it is, and with a TPS being so weight critical both in terms of overall weight and balance, and with foam cores... I would just prefer to have an epoxy or vinylester boat. Epoxy cost alot of money, vinylester should not add that more money to the build of a small skiff.

When I scraped the gelcoat off the lower front keel area on my boat years ago loading it on a trailer with a keel roller that not set-up correctly. I remember the both builder and the shop that repaired it (before I knew how) telling me it was only a cosmetic issue because my boat was all vinylester resin. Apparently the polyester based gelcoat provides little defense to water absorption but the vinylester lamination prevents it from becoming a problem. So if that's the case, why would I want a polyester resin boat below the waterline? That's my thinking anyway.

Speculating at SS costs... SS will sell you an unrigged hull for $10,000 and vinylester requires no more labor than polyester. Assuming 50% markup over cost, how much of that $5,000 material cost do you think is resin? Now, assume vinylester is double the price of polyester... what are we talkig here... a few hundred dollars? maybe $1500? $2000? It's worth it to me.

Hell... I wish they do it in all epoxy and shoot it with paint for a price.
Couple things here to add in from my time using all the above.
All resin types come in many different formulas to work best with different cloth weaves.
Basic polyester resin used with basics glass cloth has been the bench mark of the fiberglass industry since this snot was concocted.
I have built by myself over 50 skiffs, big boats and many many parts using this combination.
My present skiff is made out of basic boatyard resin from 15 years ago. The sailboat I own now was built in 1977 using basic polyester resin and eglass materials. It has been floating in salt water since then with virtually no blisters. Most boats built 20+ years ago were most likely built with basic polyester resin.
My latest Beryllium build I used epoxy resin for the outer hull skin and the rest was built using basic polyester resin because using epoxy resin is just a waste of money.
Vinylester resin has a better molecular property than polyester resin being closer to epoxy resin in its cross linking.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with a basic skiff built with polyester resin.
There is so much peer pressure today in using state of the art materials one loses the reality of the basics work just fine.
You take a basic affordable material, and combine it with a state of the art hull shape and you are getting the same performance as a skiff that costs 300% more.
The fish won’t be dissing you though because your skiff is not made of epoxy.
 

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Chris,

It’s always good to see you weigh-in so that we and gain from your experience and knowledge of not just the technical expertise in boat building, but also the history behind this segment of the market. Though I would like to seek clarification of my understanding on what you’re saying in your post.

If I do understand you correctly, you’re not saying that are no differences between the types of resin, nor are you saying that vinlyester and epoxy do not have inherent benefits over polyester. What you seem to be saying, again.. if I understand you correctly, is a value judgement that when cost is factored in that the benefits of the resins do not provide any appreciable benefit.

I’m betting it’s much more complex than this which perhaps why you used epoxy on the outer skin layer and polyester for the rest of the lamination. However, in your May 5, 2017 blog on the Lithium skiff where you talk about Chittums vs the cost of making your own skiff and that using all epoxy for your skiff would only add about $1,000 to the cost of the build. That to me is an insignificant amount of money when it comes to building a boat. So, I’m really confused if you are stating there are no benefits to vinylester or epoxy over polyester, or if the benefits are not worth the extra money (in this case a $1,000).

When with the vast majority of the recreational boating industry proudly proclaiming the use of vinylester and in some cases even epoxy, is this all a marketing scam or is just a matter where the benefits are purely academic and just don’t matter? Do you feel there is a difference in the argument of vinylester versus polyester since the cost factor is less than epoxy?

Last question… does building a boat from epoxy provide a benefit over polyester when the owner decides to later modify the boat by drilling holes in it to replace things like transducers, trolling motors, rod holder, push pole holders, trim tabs? In other words, does a cured epoxy laminate provide better resistance to water absorption than a polyester laminate, or is the benefit gained only when sealing with fresh epoxy?
 

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Hey y’all, I’m in line to get one built. I’ve never had any boat built before or have never bought a new boat so I have a question. I was on the website earlier today and realize that they raised the price on the complete package from $22,000 to$24,000. I put my deposit down before this change so does this new price l affect me or am I still going to be paying the original $22,000. Does everyone in line currently now have to pay an extra $2000? Is this just the way things work? I have no idea how this works, and I just wanted some clarification.
 

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Hey y’all, I’m in line to get one built. I’ve never had any boat built before or have never bought a new boat so I have a question. I was on the website earlier today and realize that they raised the price on the complete package from $22,000 to$24,000. I put my deposit down before this change so does this new price l affect me or am I still going to be paying the original $22,000. Does everyone in line currently now have to pay an extra $2000? Is this just the way things work? I have no idea how this works, and I just wanted some clarification.
They should have provided you with a quote that is good for x number of days.
 

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The numbers are cut off. If you put x percent down , then I would think you are good. I would still want a quote. That way both parties are on the same page.
 

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Hey y’all, I’m in line to get one built. I’ve never had any boat built before or have never bought a new boat so I have a question. I was on the website earlier today and realize that they raised the price on the complete package from $22,000 to$24,000. I put my deposit down before this change so does this new price l affect me or am I still going to be paying the original $22,000. Does everyone in line currently now have to pay an extra $2000? Is this just the way things work? I have no idea how this works, and I just wanted some clarification.
shouldn't you be asking the builder this question?
 

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Couple things here to add in from my time using all the above.
All resin types come in many different formulas to work best with different cloth weaves.
Basic polyester resin used with basics glass cloth has been the bench mark of the fiberglass industry since this snot was concocted.
I have built by myself over 50 skiffs, big boats and many many parts using this combination.
My present skiff is made out of basic boatyard resin from 15 years ago. The sailboat I own now was built in 1977 using basic polyester resin and eglass materials. It has been floating in salt water since then with virtually no blisters. Most boats built 20+ years ago were most likely built with basic polyester resin.
My latest Beryllium build I used epoxy resin for the outer hull skin and the rest was built using basic polyester resin because using epoxy resin is just a waste of money.
Vinylester resin has a better molecular property than polyester resin being closer to epoxy resin in its cross linking.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with a basic skiff built with polyester resin.
There is so much peer pressure today in using state of the art materials one loses the reality of the basics work just fine.
You take a basic affordable material, and combine it with a state of the art hull shape and you are getting the same performance as a skiff that costs 300% more.
The fish won’t be dissing you though because your skiff is not made of epoxy.
but...what about the magical carbon fiber and epoxy levitating chittum's that go where no man has gone before?
 
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