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I’m a novice fly fisher with a few different weight rods from different manufacturers. While talking with a fellow fly fisher he stated that I should stick with one brand and model across different weights to improve consistency. He said if you have different rods with different actions it will cause you to change your casting strike and it’s better to stay consistent. Is this what most people do? Thanks
 

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Where's the fun in that? Lots of the time you have a different action as you go up or down in weights of the same model rod anyways. Maybe not as drastic as a super fast model rod and a different brand medium action rod. I like to play with an array of different action rods though. Though I do have my favorites. This is just my take on the subject.
 

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No, I don't think it's what most people do. Yes, some rods do require you to adjust your stroke, or find the stroke and rhythm they work best with. This will be true within the range of a rod model though too -- the 3 and the 8 aren't going to like the same stroke. I don't believe the advice against polygunning applies with fly rods. Ideally, you get accustomed to working your way through a different rod.
 

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Do whatever you think is best for you. I’ve got slow glass fly rods and very fast graphite ones often using both on the same outing. Do I change what I do with each rod? Yes, sure, but where’s the harm in that? I guess if you are trying to win a casting championship maybe the one rod line up might be the thing. Otherwise, it’s just fishing and having fun while at it so do whatever.
 

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I don’t think it matters
I always use my friends rods when I fish with them so I don’t have to pull mine out of the rod tube when we switch up every time
I think if anything it makes you a better caster when you can pick any rod up and cast by feel




If I was buying all my rods at once maybe but I’ve collected them over years and most people probably as well
 

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If thats true I'm in trouble. Most my fly rods are from different manufacturers
 

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This has always been a problem with most mfgs, that the same rod series (i.e. make and model) in the progression of line weights, will vary in the progressive flow of the rod, from a lower weight rod, to the larger weight class in the same model. Few rod models out there out over the course of the last 30yrs+ have been able to match the same flow of the rod (progression, mandrels, tapers and bend of the rod) with it's matching true-to-weight fly line. Some companies get it close, but you can still find the rod getting stiffer as the rod weights go up. For instance, you can have an NRX and the 6, 7 and 8wt feel similar, but the 9wt starts to stiffen up, but will allow you to throw larger flies and punch it a little harder into the wind (which is maybe why they made it that way), but from a 10wt and northward, they start feeling clubby, and looses it's soul and starts to feel like your casting a broomstick. So that being said, you would have to start changing up your casting stroke (you can fix the typo with the edit button on your post. ;)), to be proficient with it.

As the guys above stated, there is some fun trying out different rods in different makes and models to accomplish the feel you are looking for. For me, if I'm fishing anything lighter than a 5wt, I'm not throwing so far and want the rod to load up easily. So a more progressive bend to the rod is what I prefer in those weights, where the rod slightly bends throughout the casting stroke from rod butt to tip. With 6-8wts, I like my rods ultra fast throughout the rod where I can get as tight of a loop as possible, since a lot of that fishing is on open flats and 60% of the time, wind is always an issue. That being said, I like to have at least 1 rod for fishing larger bugs, up in the mangroves, where the boat can be closer and I'm having to deal with branches behind me. So I like a rod that flexes in the tip and mid section for easy close up pick up and lay down cast, but has the backbone where I can put some juice on a fish trying to head to the bushes. On my 9's and 10's, it's going to be rods that are more of a fast taper than extra fast rod. So that kind of "fast rod" with some slight bend mid section, so I don't wear out my wrist and shoulders blind casting with them all day. And the larger rods (11-12wts) will be super light for it's size, but more progressive in feel than most extra fast rods, even tho I'm mostly just sight casting with them and were some of the cast may be quick and short so I want it to load easy and quick, but be able to bomb a fly out there to an on-coming string of fish, without tweaking on my tennis elbow tendon issue in my forearm :)confused:). So for me, it's more of a crutch thing, but try casting those heavy lines and you'll know what I mean regardless if you have tendon problems or not. An example of that is where I was just in a casting competition where I was throwing an 11wt NRX+ and it was windy. The rod was very light and fast, but stiff and therefore made it feel heavy on the swing when throwing a heavy 11wt line (more like the weight of a 12wt line). But my buddy's Sage X 11wt felt very sweet with that same line and overall, felt easier to throw. So the Loomis and Sage rep was there and I picked up the 8wts in both rods (it's my baseline rod to compare rods with) and the NRX+ felt light, super fast and crisp, but the Sage X in the 8 felt a little too noodlely in that line wt for an 8wt for me. But it does have it's place. But there again, it shows the difference in different brand and models of how they can compare and differ in the different line weight models as you slide up or down the scale.

Just like spinning and baitcasters, different rods for different purposes.

What makes people better fly fishermen (or fisherpersons ;)) is to learn how to change up your casting stroke with different rods, using them in different conditions with different lines and different flies. Doing the same wood chopping type of cast will only get you so far, as with anything in life. It really comes down to big performance improvements doesn't necessarily come from the equipment, as much as the casting technique(s) themselves. However, with improvements in your casting, then you can start taking advantage of the more technically advanced rods. But mind you, when you go up the ladder (intermediate rods to high end rods), the improvements will just be splitting hairs, compares to other rods on each level, but how the rod bends, feels and behaves for your casting still will be the key to selecting the right rod for you, withing your budget. I've had several rods in a certain line of rods and several more of another brand and model and another here and there to fill in the gaps for other fishing situations.

That being said, I see some people run out and buy the best equipment on the market, thinking it's going to make them a better caster, when in fact, it doesn't help much and may even effect their cast in a negative way, unless they change up some things. I can catch just as many fish and cast just as effortlessly with a $150 fly rod, as some people can with a $1100 fly rod. Is it the equipment? Hummm....:rolleyes: ;)

Ted Haas
 

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What Ted said!

My short answer is that different rod weights have different feel for a real (see what I did there) reason. The key important factor in a 6 wt is in most cases much different than the most important factor for a 10 wt.
 

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Alternatively, you may find a rod series, or sequence of models in a series, you love and that works great for your fishing, and then you end up with a bunch of them.

For example, me and the Sage Method: 8-9-10-11 Methods are the core of my saltwater and heavy warmwater fishing, my go-to's for just about anything in those classes, from slinging SA Sonar Titan 357's for deep hybrid bass to sightfishing on the flats. I use the 6 as well, and regret never grabbing a 7. The Ignitor is a fine rod, but I've learned not to expect the replacement of your favorite rod series to be your favorite rod series but even better.
 

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I think you need to cast each man. in different weights. Sometimes they do cast similarly and sometimes they are way off. For example, the NRX 8W 4 piece and the 8w one piece should theoretically be identical. I find them to be completely different. NRX 4 piece is my fav 8W and i really don't like the one piece version and they are the same man, weight, etc. That said, I like the 12W NRX one piece. It doesn't cast like any of the other NRX's I have. Again....just my opinion.
 

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I like the answer that Backwater provided above, and I agree with most of other folks here as well. A few more thoughts, though...

First, specific to your question about consistency of the taper among different rod weights in the same model line. I've run a few experiments myself to test that idea, and I really don't think that things are as consistent as the manufacturers would love for us to believe. I've had a handful of opportunities to throw the same model rod in several different weights, and also different lengths of the same model within a particular weight - like both an 8.5' and 9' version of the 5wt in a given model. I'm convinced that in most cases, the similarities are primarily cosmetic. Change the line weight and/or the rod length, and you've got a completely new rod - even if they're using the same materials and attempting to keep the taper progressions consistent.

Also, the line makes a considerable difference. For instance, I've got a glass rod that I really enjoy throwing with an old cracked up Rio Grand Trout line - and that's something, because I'm not all that into glass. But put a MPX line (a series from Scientific Angler that's a half-weight heavy, usually recommended with faster rods) on that same rod, and it becomes clumsy and clunky.

Another example: last week I tagged along for a day of casting with a couple buddies who are preparing for their exams as casting instructors. We ran around two towns to borrow rods from buddies and ended up with a nice stack of sticks. Included were three Sage X rods: the 590-4, 691-4, and 790-4. We tried different lines before settling on the MPX for the 5wt and 6wt and a Rio Redfish for the 7wt. All three of us eventually agreed that we liked the 5wt but didn't love it, hated the 6wt (at least in comparison to a Scott Radian and a NRX that we also had out), and love love loved the 7wt. So much for consistency within a given model, eh?

That said, it's critical to note here that the differences between those rods are NUANCES, and also that all of us are experienced casters. I really think that the majority of the differences in rods these days lie only in the fine details, and most of the tiny performance benefits you might get with an ideal taper + line combination are only really available to the best casters. It's also true that even the rods we didn't like were 100% capable of getting the job done in any fishing situation that anybody's likely to ever encounter. When I say that we 'hated' the 6wt X, it means that my buddy could only throw the whole line and 5ft of backing instead of the whole line and 20ft of backing. For real fishing purposes, none of those nuances matter.

One last thing, and this ties back to what Backwater said above: different rods serve different purposes. I mostly fish inshore saltwater these days, and I usually run two rods: one fast (usually an 8wt, sometimes a 7wt) for when we've got great light and clear water and can see fish far away, which means that most of our shots are in the 40-80ft range. But I also bring a softer, medium action rod (usually a 7wt, sometimes a 6wt - occasionally glass) for when the light is bad (read: clouds or bad glare) or water conditions are rotten and we're only able to see fish when we're right up on top of them. Those situations require quick, flippy casts out to 20-30ft, frequently less, often at odd angles if we're trying to limit our movement to avoid spooking fish. A stiffer rod simply won't load with such short lines and without a proper stroke, so a softer rod (and/or going one line weight heavy) helps make those frantic flippy casts at close-range fish when you've got mere seconds to get a fly out to them before they spook.

Because lines, rods (weights, lengths, tapers), and fishing situations vary so much, I think it's extremely helpful to learn to cast anything. Worry less about the stick, more about your stroke. Once you're comfortable throwing a bunch of different rods - different weights, different tapers - it'll be easier to figure out what rod(s) suit you best, and to use the right rod for the right job.
 

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I'm the first to admit I have some brand loyalty but I have rods from 4 different makers. Go cast everything you can, make sure you ask what line is on it. I think this is probably the most overlooked item in choosing a fly rod. For example, I tend to like medium fast action rods and my two primary rods feel good to me casting a line with a weight forward all purpose taper. Those same lines on some of my other much faster rods feel like I have to really pay attention to get the rod loaded and make a good cast so I have more aggressive WF tapered lines on them.
 

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Another point that I did not see is that you can spend more money on the rods you use the most. No reason to have rod that cost $700 that you use once a year, especially if it is a short trout rod that you will be fishing most commonly at 25'. Nothing wrong with always using nice gear, just not always necessary.
 
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