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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this is a dumb question.

I have a wheel puller. Is it safe to remove my steering wheel, wrap it in paracord, and put it back on? It won't come off without the puller...I tried bumping it with a rubber mallet, etc. I have the Baystar steering helm.
 

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Back the nut off where the threads are just less than flush, pull out on the wheel with both hands while someone smacks the nut with a metal hammer. They usually pop off this way. When they do the nut keeps the whole wheel from coming all the way off and making you fall off the boat and the nut protects the threads from getting compromised by the hammer. If this doesn’t work try a mini torch on the center bolt then a shot of penetrating oil.
 
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The puller may/may not work. Sometimes they just ruin the wheel. The method that @Smackdaddy53 recommended works and as long as you are pulling out good and hard on the wheel it will cause no harm to the helm. Don’t use a 10lb sledge but a 2lb mallet will pop it right off. Like smack said, leaving the nut on will not only save the threads but save you from a rearward somersault off the deck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The puller may/may not work. Sometimes they just ruin the wheel. The method that @Smackdaddy53 recommended works and as long as you are pulling out good and hard on the wheel it will cause no harm to the helm. Don’t use a 10lb sledge but a 2lb mallet will pop it right off. Like smack said, leaving the nut on will not only save the threads but save you from a rearward somersault off the deck!
Good deal. Thanks! I’ll report back!
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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Yeah I forgot to include that tidbit...no puller necessary. Just put some tension on the wheel with both hands and pop the nut a couple of times with a small smooth faced hammer. It’s a tapered shaft with a keyway/woodruff key to keep the wheel from spinning just like you have on your water pump impeller.
 

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I had to replace my steering cable this year and the hardest part was removing the steering wheel, my wheel had completely seized to the shaft. I tried the gear puller and all it did was bend and destroy the shaft. I ended up cutting off the shaft and having to heat with a torch multiple times and beating it out with a hammer to get the cut part of the shaft out.
 
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I had to replace my steering cable this year and the hardest part was removing the steering wheel, my wheel had completely seized to the shaft. I tried the gear puller and all it did was bend and destroy the shaft. I ended up cutting off the shaft and having to heat with a torch multiple times and beating it out with a hammer to get the cut part of the shaft out.
This just made me think...

These are a friction fit tapered shaft so never ever grease them before installing the wheel or it will “seize” on the shaft from being allowed to go too fat down the taper.
 

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This just made me think...

These are a friction fit tapered shaft so never ever grease them before installing the wheel or it will “seize” on the shaft from being allowed to go too fat down the taper.
I use TefGel on mine and never had them sieze. They sieze up from dissimilar metal corrosion usually worse on aluminum wheels because the shafts are steel or stainless steel. Regular grease will deteriorate but TefGel is impervious to breaking down and allowing corrosion.
 

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This just made me think...

These are a friction fit tapered shaft so never ever grease them before installing the wheel or it will “seize” on the shaft from being allowed to go too fat down the taper.
I use TefGel on mine and never had them sieze. They sieze up from dissimilar metal corrosion usually worse on aluminum wheels because the shafts are steel or stainless steel. Regular grease will deteriorate but TefGel is impervious to breaking down and allowing corrosion.
Tapered shafts are friction fit so just a VERY light coat of a liquid lubricant is all that is required. The fit is designed to create seizure. Grease and other anti-seize agents will actually prevent the parts from fitting tight enough by hydrolocking and stopping further engagement. This is one of the most common failures on tapered propeller shafts. Personally, I do like to add a bit of grease or Tef-Gel on steering wheels just to make sure they can be serviced easily since the torque exhibited on the components is nothing like that on underwater wheels. I just added this blurb so we aren't getting others confused about the design of tapered shafts.

I have always wondered why little boats get the PITA 3/4" tapered steering wheel shaft while big boats get the nice and easy 1" straight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Tapered shafts are friction fit so just a VERY light coat of a liquid lubricant is all that is required. The fit is designed to create seizure. Grease and other anti-seize agents will actually prevent the parts from fitting tight enough by hydrolocking and stopping further engagement. This is one of the most common failures on tapered propeller shafts. Personally, I do like to add a bit of grease or Tef-Gel on steering wheels just to make sure they can be serviced easily since the torque exhibited on the components is nothing like that on underwater wheels. I just added this blurb so we aren't getting others confused about the design of tapered shafts.

I have always wondered why little boats get the PITA 3/4" tapered steering wheel shaft while big boats get the nice and easy 1" straight.
So you’re saying you prefer a straight shaft over a tapered shaft? :D
 
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