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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I saw this "elsewhere" and thought it was worth passing on ...

You check on Certain Other Boating Forums and ask the experts there of course. You will always get a clear truthful answer on which boat is better than the other! Hahaha,,,, honestly, p
some of the things I looked for when purchasing my new boat was:
1-fit and finish, always look for gelcoat in not so obvious places. Some manufacturers substitute paint for gelcoat
2-look at gaps around all hatch doors, check them for smooth operation, feel there weight and structural integrity
3-through bolted hardware instead of screwed !
4-neatness and accessibility of wiring
5-accessability of all hardware, thru hull fittings, ball valves (make sure these are marine use approved, not Home Depot varieties) pumps, batteries, etc
6-all hoses double clamped on thru hulls and pumps
7-walk around the hull, bumping it with your hand, listening for a solid thud sound, never a thin hollow sound.
8-stay away from any boat using wood as any part of construction of the hull, stringers or transom.
9-carry a mirror with a extendable handle and a flashlight, look in areas not easily seen. Check for obvious issues and oversights.
10-allways take the boat you are considering for a sea trial. Watch for any flexing, unusual noises, general solid feel and ride,
11-look for any short cuts taken in the manufacturing process, does it look like it was built with pride or does it look like it was hurried through to get to the next boat.?

I know this is common sense stuff, I hope it helps someone
 

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I saw this "elsewhere" and thought it was worth passing on ...

You check on Certain Other Boating Forums and ask the experts there of course. You will always get a clear truthful answer on which boat is better than the other! Hahaha,,,, honestly, p
some of the things I looked for when purchasing my new boat was:
1-fit and finish, always look for gelcoat in not so obvious places. Some manufacturers substitute paint for gelcoat
2-look at gaps around all hatch doors, check them for smooth operation, feel there weight and structural integrity
3-through bolted hardware instead of screwed !
4-neatness and accessibility of wiring
5-accessability of all hardware, thru hull fittings, ball valves (make sure these are marine use approved, not Home Depot varieties) pumps, batteries, etc
6-all hoses double clamped on thru hulls and pumps
7-walk around the hull, bumping it with your hand, listening for a solid thud sound, never a thin hollow sound.
8-stay away from any boat using wood as any part of construction of the hull, stringers or transom.
9-carry a mirror with a extendable handle and a flashlight, look in areas not easily seen. Check for obvious issues and oversights.
10-allways take the boat you are considering for a sea trial. Watch for any flexing, unusual noises, general solid feel and ride,
11-look for any short cuts taken in the manufacturing process, does it look like it was built with pride or does it look like it was hurried through to get to the next boat.?

I know this is common sense stuff, I hope it helps someone
So does this mean a cold molded custom sporty is out? I mean, they are ALL wood. Lots of good boats with wood. Problem tends to be when dipshits start poking holes everywhere and don't seal them up.

Also, double clamps are only required in two locations: fuel fill locations and exhaust systems.

To double clamp properly, the barb/tailpiece heads to be long enough to fully support the clamp and not cut the hose. I'm often more concerned with cheap clamps or over-tightening than if there are two installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You are right about the clamps

Hell I don't double clamp on race engines ...
 
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Fly-By-Night
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So does this mean a cold molded custom sporty is out? I mean, they are ALL wood. Lots of good boats with wood. Problem tends to be when dipshits start poking holes everywhere and don't seal them up.

Also, double clamps are only required in two locations: fuel fill locations and exhaust systems.

To double clamp properly, the barb/tailpiece heads to be long enough to fully support the clamp and not cut the hose. I'm often more concerned with cheap clamps or over-tightening than if there are two installed.
If you're buying a Rybovich, classic Buddy Davis, etc, you probably don't need a list lol.
 

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Fly-By-Night
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I saw this "elsewhere" and thought it was worth passing on ...

You check on Certain Other Boating Forums and ask the experts there of course. You will always get a clear truthful answer on which boat is better than the other! Hahaha,,,, honestly, p
some of the things I looked for when purchasing my new boat was:
1-fit and finish, always look for gelcoat in not so obvious places. Some manufacturers substitute paint for gelcoat
2-look at gaps around all hatch doors, check them for smooth operation, feel there weight and structural integrity
3-through bolted hardware instead of screwed !
4-neatness and accessibility of wiring
5-accessability of all hardware, thru hull fittings, ball valves (make sure these are marine use approved, not Home Depot varieties) pumps, batteries, etc
6-all hoses double clamped on thru hulls and pumps
7-walk around the hull, bumping it with your hand, listening for a solid thud sound, never a thin hollow sound.
8-stay away from any boat using wood as any part of construction of the hull, stringers or transom.
9-carry a mirror with a extendable handle and a flashlight, look in areas not easily seen. Check for obvious issues and oversights.
10-allways take the boat you are considering for a sea trial. Watch for any flexing, unusual noises, general solid feel and ride,
11-look for any short cuts taken in the manufacturing process, does it look like it was built with pride or does it look like it was hurried through to get to the next boat.?

I know this is common sense stuff, I hope it helps someone
Good List.

I double clamped my through hulls and bilge pumps on my center console. Maybe overkill but makes me feel better.
 

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Carpe Diem
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1,699 Posts
Things to consider when buying a new boat:

1. Will your wife let you have it?
2. Can you afford it? If in doubt see #1.
3. Can your truck tow it?
4. Will it fit in your garage, yard, or barn?

If you lust after the boat and it floats, then all other considerations are unimportant.
 
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