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Baton Rouge, LA
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wasting time on Youtube and came across a build video for Sportsman boats.
Look at the shit they are doing to fill their strakes. I've seen many of these types of videos, but never something this corner cutting.


In contrast, these random dudes in Baja building this panga use a much better and more accepted method.
 

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looks to me like it would prevent having huge voids there. not a fiberglass guy though. I did see the dreaded chopper gun in action though.

I wrote the above before watching the panga vid. it does look like a much better method.
 

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It is common place in a production setting and accepted widely. I personally would lay some cloth prior to putty and not just the skin coat. @devrep you are correct, it is to avoid voids in the laminate. Difficult to bend glass in those chines. Doable in small scale but that mold probably has a hull built in it daily.
 
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I think it fully depends on the putty used. Incorporating milled fibers and/or chopped fibers would make for very strong strakes.
Yes sir, and lighter than solid glass by far!
 

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That is not cutting corners. You can see a strip of 1708 in the strake prior to putty which is industry standard. Not sure which Arjay putty that is, but they do make some very lightweight ones.
This is done to create a flat surface prior to bulking.
Do you think the strakes are not filled with something on high end bagged or infused boats? if not, they would just fill with resin when infused.
Also there are plenty of high end builders using a chop gun for skins prior to infusion, and a good gun runner can lay down some chop smoother than your average hand laid home builder.
 

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You would be surprised how many boats strakes are a thin skin coat. Then filled in with putty. I personally would put some cloth in there or go ahead and go heavy on the chop. But a lot of strakes are super tight and have sharp angles. So that limits your options. That area of a boat takes a lot of abuse. Not really a place to be saving a few ounces. Like others have said some puttys are strong. Some even have 1/2-1” glass strands mixed in them. Although that stuff they are using looks a bit too creamy. And the other guys work is actually inferior in my opinion. It’s definitely heavy on the resin to glass ratio.
 

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Been there done that. The panga resin looked real thin, one must be real careful with polyester and that much mass. It gets hot quick when an inch thick. Hot enough to deform the finished gel coat. Gun roven has a fair amount of binders in it that need to be hosed to dissolve and become soft.

I do see knitted glass under the putty being applied to the strakes. My guess many shops prefill strakes to avoid the need to work the layers of glass into them.
 

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I was wasting time on Youtube and came across a build video for Sportsman boats.
Look at the shit they are doing to fill their strakes. I've seen many of these types of videos, but never something this corner cutting.


In contrast, these random dudes in Baja building this panga use a much better and more accepted method.
When I was in Willy Roberts shop in Tavernier, way back in the early 80’s, I remember him telling me the structural strength of a boat comes from all the areas that have angles. Chines, strikes and keel shapes are the strongest areas of a hull. The stringer system gives the hull rigidity. He saw the design used that developed the strength and rigidity, not putty.
 

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I did it the way Chris Morejohn did in his thread. Shaped some core, glued to the bottom, couple layers of 10 oz, a little putty, sand. That seemed to work just fine. It's almost like he knows something about boat building or something. That wasn't a mold though, obviously.
 

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I'd assume after watching that it's probably common practice for most production built boats (Sportsman, Key West, Pioneer, Sea Hunt, etc) to use putty filled strakes for various reasons. Probably a reason you don't see any other production companies showing you what's "behind the glass." You may not like what you see. I toured the factory years ago, before the monstrosity it is now, and was actually impressed by the quality control measures they took. Been on many other boats that should be ashamed of what left their facility.

However, I also don't see how the rope saturated in a pool of resin in the panga build is any better/stronger... I am a newbie at this stuff and intrigued by all the building methods
 

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I know a little about composite construction, but not a whole lot about boats, not like I am in the industry. So ignore me, I am an idiot. But....

Every commercially built boat could be better. Just go to an aerospace supplier and ask for the very latest and finest design and construction in your new boat. When the resulting 18 foot flats boat hull costs $1,350,000, you'll know you have the very, very best.

Seriously, either of the boats subject of this thread would be completely usable and probably for a very long time. And most of us reading this could actually buy one, even if used.
 

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Baton Rouge, LA
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The problem with their method, is the uneven surface left behind after they apply the putty. Theres no way to get the surface perfectly flat with the putty without sanding in between.
 
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