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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Krash on this site says he is sidelined do to a health issue. Wish him well and a speedy recovery. Got me thinking. I have a bad case of plantar fasciitis. Anyone else? I’m in pain day and night. And a day poling is absolutely brutal. Makes for a very bad night. Almost to the point I don’t want to pole anymore. What have you done to improve or cure this ailment? The frozen water bottle, ibuprofen and stretches do nothing. It is very common. I assume there must be others on here with it. I think years of poling caused it.
 

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Just livin’ my life easy come easy go...
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Rest it. Stretch, and wear good/supportive shoes. Never go barefoot even taking a piss at night. Keep flips beside the bed. I’d recommend yoga as the exercise to help it as well. Downward dog as the stretch, but any of the hamstring and calf stretches should help.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I've got it but it's getting better. It still flares up if I wear bad shoes or go barefoot a lot especially on hard surfaces. Stretches help a lot. I had a special compression sock I wore for a while and also a hard rubber ball I used to roll the arch and heel. Hurts like hell but helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most boats have a slight squat. However your body wants to stand straight. So you have a slight lean forward to be straight up. Towers should be made at an angle to compensate. Plus the constant balancing as boat shifts along with pressure of holding yourself in place while poling. Always made for tired feet. Just an opinion. Might also have to do with working on ladders for 30 years too. And since no doctor can say why I have it. I reviewed my life and those are two activities that bother have bothered my feet at the end of the day and poling during the day.
I do the stretches and flops bedside are a must. Stepping down barefoot will almost make you fall over. Nothing like the pain of being woken up to someone stabbing you in the foot with a red hot knife at 2am.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I had some issues with it a while back. Stretching was a big help, minimizing walking barefoot helped and the occasional Advil. What I noticed was that I slept with my feet pointed under the covers. This allowed my calf muscles and tendons to really contract so when I got up out of bed, the instant pull on my tight tendons and muscles shot near crippling pain through my feet. I making a conscious conscious effort to sleep with my toes up and even used a heavy blanket on my feet to help keep them back and somewhat stretched. It worked for me and now I just naturally don’t point my feet when I sleep.

Also, I fished a buddy’s skiff and he had 10mm seadek on his poling platform and casting platform. Fished and poled all day, no pain like I feel on my boat with 4mm seadek. New skiff will have 10 or even 13mm seadek on the platforms. Growing old ain’t for sissies.
 

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Krash on this site says he is sidelined do to a health issue. Wish him well and a speedy recovery. Got me thinking. I have a bad case of plantar fasciitis. Anyone else? I’m in pain day and night. And a day poling is absolutely brutal. Makes for a very bad night. Almost to the point I don’t want to pole anymore. What have you done to improve or cure this ailment? The frozen water bottle, ibuprofen and stretches do nothing. It is very common. I assume there must be others on here with it. I think years of poling caused it.
I had this for a while. Very painful. It's a swollen nerve in your arch. They make a small brace you wear over socks and your foot will still fit in your shoes. It has a air pocket that applies pressure to your arch and relieves the pressure. Mine went away after wearing this for a few weeks. They are available. They are available everywhere as a foot brace for plantar fasciitis.
 

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Krash on this site says he is sidelined do to a health issue. Wish him well and a speedy recovery. Got me thinking. I have a bad case of plantar fasciitis. Anyone else? I’m in pain day and night. And a day poling is absolutely brutal. Makes for a very bad night. Almost to the point I don’t want to pole anymore. What have you done to improve or cure this ailment? The frozen water bottle, ibuprofen and stretches do nothing. It is very common. I assume there must be others on here with it. I think years of poling caused it.
Superfeet insoles cured the plantar problem for me. See superfeet.com. I use the green or the orange. I even put them in my wading boots in Montana. I also used a brace at night that keeps you foot in the standing position while you sleep. This lets the tendon heal. If you don’t do this it contracts at night and then tears again when you stand up in the morning. For me I had to use the brace at night until it healed then the Superfeet to keep it from happening. Amazon carries them.
 

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I'm just spitballing here, but I wonder if squat shoes with the raised heel might help. You'd look pretty silly, but it would definitely raise up the heel and change the angle at which you're standing.
Pic related.
 

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Lowcountry Degen
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I'm just spitballing here, but I wonder if squat shoes with the raised heel might help. You'd look pretty silly, but it would definitely raise up the heel and change the angle at which you're standing.
Pic related.
The downside to lifters is that they usually have no (or very little) cushion.

I wish I had a suggestion for you other than what's been said before. My dad had it pretty bad for a while when he was playing basketball all the time. I remember him stretching his feet and calves on the stairs a lot, and I feel like I remember him using a ball or roller or something underfoot. I'm worried I'll eventually be in the same boat since my ankle mobility is pretty poor (both directions), so I try to stretch as often as possible but could definitely do better.
 

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The downside to lifters is that they usually have no (or very little) cushion.

I wish I had a suggestion for you other than what's been said before. My dad had it pretty bad for a while when he was playing basketball all the time. I remember him stretching his feet and calves on the stairs a lot, and I feel like I remember him using a ball or roller or something underfoot. I'm worried I'll eventually be in the same boat since my ankle mobility is pretty poor (both directions), so I try to stretch as often as possible but could definitely do better.
True, but you could also chalk up the push pole and get some lifting straps. Little crossover workout.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I had Castaway make my poling platform pad out of 20mm.
Very reasonable (well under $100).
I just spent 4 straight days on the platform and can honestly say it's the best addition I've ever done to my skiff.
Had knee surgery one month ago, and have a bum hip.
I'm normally in pain 5-6 or less hours into a day and now I'm good until dark 30.
My $.02
Good luck.

Screenshot_20191107-092226_Drive.jpg
 

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You can try every strategy posted here but first make a point of seeing an experienced podiatrist... Then carefully follow whatever treatment is given. That’s what my wife, a nurse for 25 years, did... and worked when nothing else did.

Me, I have lower back issues that only bother when I’m NOT poling my skiff a few days each week. Go figure...
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I had some issues with it a while back. Stretching was a big help, minimizing walking barefoot helped and the occasional Advil. What I noticed was that I slept with my feet pointed under the covers. This allowed my calf muscles and tendons to really contract so when I got up out of bed, the instant pull on my tight tendons and muscles shot near crippling pain through my feet. I making a conscious conscious effort to sleep with my toes up and even used a heavy blanket on my feet to help keep them back and somewhat stretched. It worked for me and now I just naturally don’t point my feet when I sleep.
THIS. I had PF for a the better part of a year because of the shoes I wore to work. I have flat feet, and these (dress) shoes had a high arch and an elevated heel. I changed my shoes. Additionally, my mom had bad PF, and they prescribed her a "boot" to wear at night while she slept. The boot is designed to keep your foot at 90 degrees and keep your tendons in a neutral position. As jay mentioned, I too used to sleep with my feet & toes pointed (my wife tucks our sheets in really right) which led to the tendons in my arches being contracted all night. Once I started sleeping with my toes pointed towards my head, my symptoms went away pretty quickly. (the sheets are still tucked in right and I now use this to keep my foot pointed in the up position.)

I'd also add, our musculature is basically a chain. In my experience, the location where I feel pain is not necessarily the root cause location. I tend to have pain/injuries at my smallest and weakest muscles due to tightness or lack of mobility of larger muscles. If you think of a chain with different size links, the smallest links will always fail first. Part of the approach I took to my PF was; my arches hurt because my calf muscles are tight, and my calves are tight because my hamstrings are tight. Since the hamstring is the largest muscle in this chain, I did a lot of stretching and mobility work to improve the length of my hamstrings, which relieved stress on my calves and downstream to my arches.

I think its also important to work on strengthening any muscles that serve a stabilizing function while you increase joint mobility through stretching or other methods, since these will have atrophied during the time your joint had a lesser range of motion.

Full disclosure - I have no medical training. The information above is based on the following resources I have read/watched and implemented and have worked for me.

Mobility, range of motion, stretching, etc: Kelly Starrett thereadystate.com, instagram account of the same name - shares videos daily of different stretching and mobility exercises. He has a good youtube channel and has authored a bunch of books that can be found on amazon.

I also have had a lower back injury that I have been fighting for years. Dr. Eric Goodman has come up with a method of core strengthening called Foundation Training that combines expansive breathing, strengthening & movement exercises that have done a lot to relieve my pain and improve my body mechanics. He also has a couple books, and youtube videos.
 

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Rex Kwan Do Dojo
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I recently had a really bad attack due to new fancy business shoes having a minimum arch support. Heres what worked for me:

Calf stretch pushing against the wall while at the same time crossing your good leg in front of your affected leg. Google YouTube there is a PT video.

Get one of those compression socks that have a strap at the toes that ties into the back of the knee. If forces your foot to flex back towards your head and stretches that tendon.

Hot water foot bath with Epsom salts.

After going to MD, while in office, consider asking MD for topical Voltaren gel script.
 

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I am a retired long-distance runner. Your condition is most likely caused by poor foot structure and inappropriate shoes, which can overload the plantar fascia (the connective tissue that runs from your heel to the base of your toes), resulting in heel pain.

The plantar fascia looks like a series of fat rubber bands, but it’s made of collagen, a rigid protein that’s not very stretchy. The stress of overuse, overpronation, or overused shoes in runners can rip tiny tears in it, causing heel pain and inflammation (plantar fasciitis).

Very tight calf muscles contribute to the condition. Flat feet or high arches can also contribute to the problem.

I have known others to use frozen orange juice containers to roll the foot over while watching TV, etc. to help ease the pain and reduce the inflammation. Arch support is key, and walking around barefoot or in flimsy shoes can delay recovery. Orthotics, foot taping, cortisone injections, night splints, and anti-inflammatories decrease symptoms significantly in many within four to six weeks. Some people require physical therapy or even shock-wave therapy. Platlet-rich plasma injections is an emerging treatment regimen.

I know this can be painful and frustrating. Hope you get better.
 
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