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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for advice, experience...
I've poled boats down wind and couldn't stop for a second without the boat hooking or turning the nose into the wind. I suppose if you want to pole against the wind it's ideal. Is it hull design 馃 or what. I would prefer to choose the direction I want to pole to and post up without fighting the constant turning actions.

Let's hear what you guys have to say.
Let it rip!
 

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Mine tends to swing stern out in the wind, I just use the pole to compensate. I'd be surprised if most skiffs didn't do it when the wind is blowing. I'm pretty new to the poling skiff game though, I sure some of salts on here will have a more educated answer.
 

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Are you poling open an flat, shoreline, creek etc? Everyone likes to pole down wind or quartering down wind but upwind has it鈥檚 benefits. Steve Huff loves to pole into the wind and for good reason. If he swears by it it can鈥檛 be a terrible idea!
Poling down wind I find the sweet spot and every stroke hits that angle or a little either way to keep the boat going down the shoreline even if it鈥檚 dog tracking (at an angle but still moving the right direction). It鈥檚 a constant adjustment that you will only get that 鈥渟econd nature鈥 feeling after you have done it long enough. Poling into wind is going to cause more hull slap and your angler on the bow will be casting into or close to into the wind the whole time. If they are good this is not a terrible idea. If they are novice it鈥檚 probably flirting with you getting a free fly piercing or wear the person out faster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you poling open an flat, shoreline, creek etc? Everyone likes to pole down wind or quartering down wind but upwind has it鈥檚 benefits. Steve Huff loves to pole into the wind and for good reason. If he swears by it it can鈥檛 be a terrible idea!
Poling down wind I find the sweet spot and every stroke hits that angle or a little either way to keep the boat going down the shoreline even if it鈥檚 dog tracking (at an angle but still moving the right direction). It鈥檚 a constant adjustment that you will only get that 鈥渟econd nature鈥 feeling after you have done it long enough. Poling into wind is going to cause more hull slap and your angler on the bow will be casting into or close to into the wind the whole time. If they are good this is not a terrible idea. If they are novice it鈥檚 probably flirting with you getting a free fly piercing or wear the person out faster.
We were poling a open flat full of lemon sharks I've never seen so many this time of year normally in August and September. The fish and sharks were super spooky. Would have poled against the wind except the sun was in our face. This was out of flamingo last Saturday morning. We both are novice with alot to learn.
 

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Trim the motor down a little and put some lower unit in the water to act as a rudder. The hardest thing about poling downwind is keeping the boat going slow enough. I spend a lot of time with my pole forward alternating sides to keep the boat relatively straight or preferably at the angle best for the guy up front casting.
One of the reasons I like poling upwind, is the ability to use the wind to stop the boat. All too often, the boat will spook the fish before the angler gets the fly to the fish or gets the fish interested enough to eat. We don't have super clear water and if the fish are laid up, they might not move until 10' or less from the boat. Being able to stop the boat by simply stopping poling helps to keep from spooking the fish with the boat. The other issue is if the fish is coming at the boat. Going upwind gives the angler more time.
 

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Don't pole so hard down wind, let it push you along and just side to side adjust. Jay's advice above is very good. Stopping will be a bigger issue. As you are learning leaving a little bit of skeg in will help since your boat likes to swing bow downwind.

My old skiff swung downwind which was fine because it was heavy. My new one swings upwind which is great because it is really quiet upwind.
 

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Take it easy and pole gently. Don't be in a rush. If you are poling downwind be gentle with your adjustments as the wind will magnify what you do.
I was poling an edge today with a quartering wind off my starboard bow. I was poling just enough to stay at a set depth on the edge and was using the wind to move down the edge. It was a bit weird to not fully control the boat but it was easier to ride the wind while I made sure the bow was pointed in the right direction while the wind pushed to boat down the edge.
As I have gained experience I realized that you have to factor in wind, current, angler experience and potential target areas when poling.
In this case I wanted to ride the edge, the wind could help if I did the right thing, the current was incoming, my wife makes better casts downwind and I figured fish would be coming to me so all factored into my strategy. I poled the whole time like I was trying to turn the boat to the right but the wind negated that and kept me moving down the edge at about 3' deep.
 

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Athleticism is the best asset of a shallow water fish hunter and skiff pusher. Taller is better.. more stroke with fewer resets.. Also being a bit of a masochist helps. Use your legs as much as your shoulders and change sides occasionally. Somewhat related, very few golfers like playing in the wind and very few fly casters like casting into a breeze. Last but not least,, the lightest pole possible with a diameter that fits your hand size.. and a skiff that floats level and not too heavy or too light.
 

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All good suggestions. I use my hip a lot to apply pressure to the pole. Don't where pants with brads on the pockets unless you like making noise.
 

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If it鈥檚 not hard bottom I will pole with the tip and stick it in a little to slow down, straighten up, or stop for a fish.
 

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Gervais beat me to it, but I am usually on a soft bottom so if we are going down wind, I just stab into the bottom if I see a fish. Helps get stopped and you can get more shots at a fish.
 

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Trim the motor down a little and put some lower unit in the water to act as a rudder.
This. It really helps the boat track in high wind. I use it where I can keep the boat at a 90 degree angle in certain conditions without much work, giving the angler the complete freedom to cast without worrying about hitting me.
 

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This. It really helps the boat track in high wind. I use it where I can keep the boat at a 90 degree angle in certain conditions without much work, giving the angler the complete freedom to cast without worrying about hitting me.
On my Waterman, I trim down a bit of the lower unit and turn full right or full left (depending on which way I want it to track) and can get a nice angle going down wind. I just adjust as needed with the pole. The skiff also responds nicely to having the skeg straight, if that鈥檚 what needed. As for the OP鈥檚 original question, there鈥檚 some great tips up there! Lightest pole, use your hips, etc...
 

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All great points, it seems every time I pole it's in to the wind. I love polling down wind. It's quite cause I'm not grunting like I do going into the wind. Seriously, polling down wind all you have to do is guide it.
 

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Two guys have nailed it... going down wind use the pointy end not the fork on soft bottom. Go gently and let the wind help you along. Simple matter to drive the point a bit further into the bottom - or stop cold if you see fish, using the point (then tether off if you need to get down off of the platform- one of the reasons I never needed a Power Pole...).

Different deal entirely on hard bottom... but that鈥檚 not the Everglades...
 

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Trim the motor down a little and put some lower unit in the water to act as a rudder. The hardest thing about poling downwind is keeping the boat going slow enough. I spend a lot of time with my pole forward alternating sides to keep the boat relatively straight or preferably at the angle best for the guy up front casting.
One of the reasons I like poling upwind, is the ability to use the wind to stop the boat. All too often, the boat will spook the fish before the angler gets the fly to the fish or gets the fish interested enough to eat. We don't have super clear water and if the fish are laid up, they might not move until 10' or less from the boat. Being able to stop the boat by simply stopping poling helps to keep from spooking the fish with the boat. The other issue is if the fish is coming at the boat. Going upwind gives the angler more time.
Nailed it
 

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Looking for advice, experience...
I've poled boats down wind and couldn't stop for a second without the boat hooking or turning the nose into the wind. I suppose if you want to pole against the wind it's ideal. Is it hull design 馃 or what. I would prefer to choose the direction I want to pole to and post up without fighting the constant turning actions.

Let's hear what you guys have to say.
Let it rip!
I鈥檝e been poling various skiffs for more than 50 years. It鈥檚 not the hull design , it depends on wind and current how the boat swings when you stop poling. If you stake out boat to stop it and wind opposite to current any boat will swing.
 
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