Dedicated To The Smallest Of Skiffs banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
> PRO STAFF <
Joined
·
7,537 Posts
Only one way to make proper use of a pocket tunnel,
install a nosecone, low water pickup, powered jackplate,
surface piercing prop, and a big enough horsepower outboard
to push all the extra weight. But, with the new regulations
regarding seagrass beds, going that fast in shallow water
is going to get really expensive if you get caught!
 

·
> PRO STAFF <
Joined
·
7,537 Posts
Never said it wasn't fun to build. Never said I didn't have a blast testing it.
Never said I didn't learn more hands on, than from all the reading I did.
What I am saying is that in areas with seagrass shallows,
manatee zones, pole-troll zones and no wake areas,
that a pocket tunnel really doesn't give you but 3 to 4 inches running advantage
over a simple flat bottomed hull. Unless you invest in a power jack plate,
trim tabs, nosecone with low water pickup and a surface piercing prop.
Then you can take full advantage of a pocket tunnel and run with
only 2 or 3 inches of prop and skeg below the hull.
Now we're talking more horsepower, transom weight,
more fuel and greater expense and maintenance.
Which adds up to a boat that doesn't float as shallow,
which was the main intent of my build, getting shallow.
For a well designed tunnel, you need look no further than the Texas Scooters.
They have it already down to an art form. Those tunnels
are more like funnels, that squeeze what water there is up into a hump
that allows them to run in just a few inches of water, in an area
where most of it is mud bottom. No seagrass damage.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top