Photography-which cam?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Jfack, Jun 15, 2017.

  1. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188
    Looking at getting a nice dslr. We had a cannon t4i before, but ended up selling it.

    What would be a good camera/lens? Was looking at some nikons. Idk what is good or not though. Any suggestions?
     
  2. jmrodandgun

    jmrodandgun Well-Known Member

    1,422
    871
    718
    Lens first. Then body. Try and find time to read Understanding Exposure while you're at it.

    All of the new DSLR bodies are far more capable than you are, so your limitations will come from the glass. Spend your money on the lens and use whatever is left over to get a decent enough body until you're ready to upgrade.
     
    Jfack likes this.

  3. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188
    Any suggestions on what to get? Is around $5-600 just too low of a budget to get into some nice equipment? I'd imagine some outdoorsy fishing/nature shots. Then casual pics of closer stuff. I'm thinking that'd require 2 different kinds of lenses. I'd like a cam that can get quick shots off too. Action boat running shots, skateboarding, surfing type stuff.
     
  4. not2shabby

    not2shabby Well-Known Member

    267
    136
    178
    You can do really well with that budget. I prefer Nikon because they have retained the same lens mount for decades. This means you can buy really high quality (older) lenses and they'll work with new Nikon cameras. The only question is whether or not the autofocus will work on the body you're using. You can pick up Nikon's D7000 (used) for pretty cheap these days. When it came out, it was the best amateur DSLR you could buy. It is a crop sensor camera, but that doesn't matter to 95% of amateur photogs. Its crop factor is actually better than the crop factor Canons. The D7000 also has an autofocus motor which allows you to use older Nikon lenses and still retain the autofocus function. Lower-end Nikon models need newer lenses to have autofocus. The D7000 seems to be the sweet spot of capability and economy. There have been upgrades - the D7100 and D7200, but you'll get a better deal on the older, but totally capable D7000.

    My recommendation would be a used Nikon D7000 (especially if you're going to use it on a boat...things happen). Pair that with a Nikon 55-300mm VR lens (or 200mm if the 300mm doesn't fit your budget) and you'll be covered for almost everything you want to shoot. Down the road, if you want to shoot wider and have a shallower depth of field, I'd add the 35mm f/1.8 DX to your camera bag for super sharp subjects and smooth bokeh.

    Something out of the box...Sony is making some pretty impressive mirrorless DSLR cameras. This makes the body a lot smaller, but you still have the ability to use really good glass (glass = lenses in photog speak). I don't have much experience with the Sonys, but I would investigate if I was in the market for a new camera.

    Also, invest in a good dry bag. Even if you think your dry storage is truly dry.
     
    Plantation, Blue Zone and Jfack like this.
  5. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188
    Sorry if i sound like the "I want a 6" draft boat that can handle 4' chop without getting my salt life shirt wet" guy.

    Just have that itch for something new and want to get started playing with it and learning.
     
  6. FSUDrew99

    FSUDrew99 Well-Known Member

    668
    163
    168
    My Rebel T5 is great. Only 18 MP but does well, came with the standard and a zoom lens in that combo kit they sell.

    I wish it was a 24 MP or so, but cant complain. The images are sharp and crisp and that zoom lens is nice.

    I agree with the lens statement if you are taking a lot of longer shots a stable camera is key as well as a quality lens (not necessarily the one I have from the combo)

    Id like to try out some nice fish eye lenses as well down the road..
     
    Jfack likes this.
  7. mtoddsolomon

    mtoddsolomon Lip Ripper

    1,148
    1,088
    718
    I was researching this a while back as well and ended up with a Nikon d3400 with an extra lens. A lot of videos online and forums I read led me to the Nikon d3400 over the cannon t6i for "wildelife photography" it's within that budget
     
  8. Atomic

    Atomic Well-Known Member

    148
    102
    68
    I have a Nikon D3100 that I bought when it first came out for $700 with a lens. I've been very happy with it, its easy to use and very capable. The glass is what really impacts the quality of your photos. Don't worry about megapixels, those are almost solely for print quality like if you were wanting to print out a poster size picture.
     
  9. Blue Zone

    Blue Zone I Love microskiff.com!

    734
    329
    438
    If you can swing it, think about two fixed focal length lenses of different focal lengths (maybe a 35mm and a 180mm) rather than one zoom. They will produce better detail even if you have to crop (to bring subjects closer) and are faster lenses (for lower light conditions).
     
  10. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188
    Thanks for all the responses guys! Lot to think about haha. I'm searching the local craigslist for deals now. I keep seeing "low shutter count." Do cameras wear out? say if I buy used off of someone who shoots for a living, will the camera be trashed from amount of shots? That may be a dumb question.

    Now for a lens, is 55-300 a lot more zoom then 55-200. And I'm guessing vr is something I want? I see some 300 lenses without it. Will vr help a ton in stabilizing zoomed in?

    Bluezone, is the speed in the lens? I do pretty much all board sports. Would definitely like a cam that can snap quick action shots. Now that is something that can wait if it's just a fast lens thing.
     
  11. not2shabby

    not2shabby Well-Known Member

    267
    136
    178
    On a contemporary DSLR, you don't have to worry until you get well over 100k shots. Most cameras have a shutter life of 150k actuations.

    VR is the Nikon internal lens "vibration reduction" mechanism. Pretty handy if you're shooting hand-held with a zoom lens. Not essential, but a nice feature.

    "Speed" of a lens is specifically referring to the lens aperture (this is the opening inside the lens that allows light through to the mirror and sensor). A lens with a wide aperture (small f/ number...like 1.4, 1.8, 2.0) lets in more light, so you can set a faster shutter speed to get a properly exposed photo. Think of it like a window in a room. With a big window, there is a lot of light to fill the room and you'll be able to see everything in the room...even if it's fast action. It's a trade off though. Small apertures, associated with larger f/ stop numbers, definitely have their uses as well. Some zoom lenses have a range of maximum apertures (i.e. 4.5 - 5.6). Some zoom lenses have the same max all the way through their focal range.

    If you'd like to talk photography before you make the investment, feel free to PM me. There are also some great resources on YouTube.
     
    Jfack likes this.
  12. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188

    Thanks for all the info! I'll definitely pm you when I find something to see if it's worth it.
     
  13. devrep

    devrep Well-Known Member

    1,876
    558
    968
    when you say the Nikon bodies can use the old lenses, how old is old? Assume you are talking about old digital camera lenses, not old Nikon SLR lenses. For instance I still have 2 F1's and 2 F2's from back in the day with about 5 lenses. That was some good glass.
     
  14. Vertigo

    Vertigo Carpe Diem

    1,023
    332
    938
  15. not2shabby

    not2shabby Well-Known Member

    267
    136
    178
    99% chance the old Nikon (or Nikkor) lenses you used on the 35mm film cameras will fit on a new Nikon DSLR. The Nikon lens F-mount has been used since 1959. There are some qualifications to this regarding metering, indexing, and autofocus. Look up the specific lenses on Ken Rockwell's website for details.
     
  16. permitchaser

    permitchaser I Love Skinny Water

    2,966
    442
    688
    Why don't you USD your iPhone fist to see if your any good. Then for board sports you need a gopro or something water proof. I saw one knock off in a waterproof case for $20
    Yes you would not want to buy a news photographers camera, they wear out
    I have shot stock for years for NY agency and have been published in many print mediums. I use Nikon
     
  17. Atomic

    Atomic Well-Known Member

    148
    102
    68
    Not to downplay you but my iPhone photos are far inferior to the photos my Nikon takes. There are waterproof covers you can buy for SLRs. Nikon is great because as previously mentioned old lenses are interchangeable with the new bodies.
     
  18. Jfack

    Jfack I Love microskiff.com!

    361
    266
    188
    Ended up going to target and they had the d3400 on sale with 18-55 lens and the 70-300 lens for $500. So we bought it. Thanks for all the replies guys! Looking forward to getting into this.
     
    Atomic and mtoddsolomon like this.