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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to eliminate the wing nut battery terminals on a Merc 30. Have looked at replacement to fit the larger battery posts, but it appears the motor wires are too small to attach tightly. Are there specific terminals made for outboards? Thanks.
 

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You're on the right track - with a few things to consider... Yes, eliminate the wingnuts - and go to locking stainless steel nuts instead on those same terminals... No, do not use the larger posts meant for automotive installations. What you want for terminals on wiring attached to batteries are tinned copper lug ends that have the ring size that matches the post size on your battery you'll find them in a marine hardware store (on some batteries the positive and negative terminals will be different sizes...).

After carefully crimping those lugs to wire ends (no soldering - since those kind of joints will crack out and fail from the flexing any marine battery connections has to go through in daily use...) you'll want adhesive lined heat shrink to cover where the wire insulation ends (about a half inch in each direction - and try to match your wire's insulation colors -red for positive, black for negative)...

We just upgraded my old Maverick to support a new trolling motor with a 24 volt power supply. It required a third battery and the re-location of the cranking battery - as well as all kinds of new connections with the addition of an on-board charger and a 60 amp breaker. I fumble with wiring so I was lucky enough to get Capt Jorge Valverde to do most of the skilled labor and it was a treat to watch and assist him doing the work. Now all I need to do is get out there and see how everything works. It's been at least 20 years since I had a trolling motor on my old skiff - but the new gear works so well on other boats I've been running (for customers needing a heads up on their first visit to the 'glades) that I'm finally stepping up...

Remember that wiring installations on boats are not the same as what you'll find on a car so ask questions and learn - that's what all of us have had to do...

Aren't boats fun?
 

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You're on the right track - with a few things to consider... Yes, eliminate the wingnuts - and go to locking stainless steel nuts instead on those same terminals... No, do not use the larger posts meant for automotive installations. What you want for terminals on wiring attached to batteries are tinned copper lug ends that have the ring size that matches the post size on your battery you'll find them in a marine hardware store (on some batteries the positive and negative terminals will be different sizes...).

After carefully crimping those lugs to wire ends (no soldering - since those kind of joints will crack out and fail from the flexing any marine battery connections has to go through in daily use...) you'll want adhesive lined heat shrink to cover where the wire insulation ends (about a half inch in each direction - and try to match your wire's insulation colors -red for positive, black for negative)...

We just upgraded my old Maverick to support a new trolling motor with a 24 volt power supply. It required a third battery and the re-location of the cranking battery - as well as all kinds of new connections with the addition of an on-board charger and a 60 amp breaker. I fumble with wiring so I was lucky enough to get Capt Jorge Valverde to do most of the skilled labor and it was a treat to watch and assist him doing the work. Now all I need to do is get out there and see how everything works. It's been at least 20 years since I had a trolling motor on my old skiff - but the new gear works so well on other boats I've been running (for customers needing a heads up on their first visit to the 'glades) that I'm finally stepping up...

Remember that wiring installations on boats are not the same as what you'll find on a car so ask questions and learn - that's what all of us have had to do...

Aren't boats fun?
You are gonna love your new setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
20190628_175532.jpg

Perhaps I misspoke. This is what I have now. I disconnect the negative when not in use. Always have to fiddle after reconnecting and sometimes while on the water. Have to loosen, move around, retighten a number of times to get a good connection that turns it over. Is this terminal different than the ones that Capt. L spoke of? Thanks roar the reply's.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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View attachment 80422

Perhaps I misspoke. This is what I have now. I disconnect the negative when not in use. Always have to fiddle after reconnecting and sometimes while on the water. Have to loosen, move around, retighten a number of times to get a good connection that turns it over. Is this terminal different than the ones that Capt. L spoke of? Thanks roar the reply's.
Why do you disconnect it? Is there a switch in the system? Maybe that could eliminate your need to disconnect when not in use
 

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Brandon, FL
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I have the same terminals and have never disconnected them. The only time is when I changed the battery.

You said wingnut? Yes - wingnuts are bad but that is not a wingnut.
 

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Brandon, FL
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Yeah, know that. Was referring to the threaded post type rather than the larger post. A switch would solve the problem.
So why are you continuously taking it off?

Like I said above mine hasn't been taken off in 10 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So why are you continuously taking it off?
Thought I had a drain when I had what appeared to be a dead battery that was fairly new last year.. The only other electronics I have is a bilge pump. Perhaps it was just a bad connection that was misdiagnosed.
 

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Panhandler
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Yep, wing nuts are an accident waiting to happen. Add a Perko or Blue Seas battery switch to isolate the electrical system and turn it off when you put the boat up. Use stainless steel nuts and lock washers to semi-permanently tighten the leads to the battery. Should solve your problems.
 
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