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There was a thread on here a while ago about catching reds with a dropper, but I've never tried it and I'm too dumb to find the thread again.
 

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I’d like to try it in the surf. Of course, I’ve never actually nymphed but the technique seems applicable.
 

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I have dead drifted flies with success plenty of times before for reds/trout but was thinking of trying a nymphing set up with an indicator to see how it would work in creeks. In my mind it should be no different , just now with an indicator.

Has anyone done this before?
Interesting thought.
Suggest opening your loop when casting to prevent tangles.
 

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I use the popper/dropper rig quite often. I actually tied up some smaller #4 Double barrel poppers and use #4 clousers under it. I can cast it on a 6wt which makes for a much more enjoyable day of blind casting.

I haven't done any saltwater nymphing though it sounds like a cool approach. There have been plenty of times we have found fish stacked up in the winter with a little current running through. you could cast out a decent crab pattern and pick up fish with out issue.
 

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Just let something tasty looking, maybe with a little added weight, drift in the current, isn't that basically "nymph" fishing? Isn't there Euro nymph fishing, tight line, and/or the type done with indicators? I drift little weighted shrimp patterns with the current in the surf here, but just use long fluorocarbon leaders on floating fly line and forgo the indicator. The indicator might help keep the fly out of the roots or rocks or shell wherever those are a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just let something tasty looking, maybe with a little added weight, drift in the current, isn't that basically "nymph" fishing? Isn't there Euro nymph fishing, tight line, and/or the type done with indicators? I drift little weighted shrimp patterns with the current in the surf here, but just use long fluorocarbon leaders on floating fly line and forgo the indicator. The indicator might help keep the fly out of the roots or rocks or shell wherever those are a problem.
Correct I’ve drifted plenty of flies but thinking an indicator might make it easier to detect fly location while drifting structure, controlling depth, and helping anglers notice strikes beyond watching the line.
 

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I would need to first learn how to "nymph", then find out how to do it in salt. I never learned how to freshwater flyfish :(
Would be a great way to approach micro poon in creeks or moving water.

I've thought about getting a 3wt nymph rod just for that purpose.
 

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I have dead drifted flies with success plenty of times before for reds/trout but was thinking of trying a nymphing set up with an indicator to see how it would work in creeks. In my mind it should be no different , just now with an indicator.

Has anyone done this before?
A lesser known “nymphing” method is dead drifting a streamer or woolly bugger under an indicator. Deadly on big fish tail water. This sounds like it would work great on tidal creeks. You could throw it 60 feet upstream, let it come past you and then stack mend downstream. You can get a 120 foot drift. And you could do it with a 5 or 6 weight.
 

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We never dead drift (nymphing?) for tarpon - but we do something pretty similar when hunting big tarpon in rivers along the gulf coast of the 'glades...

These big girls hold in rivers before and after the migration - like big salmon do up north.... First you have to locate them and that means sneaking into a place (river bend, river fork, places where there's strong current with a current break somewhere very close by... as well as downed tree they can lay behind) where they're holding quietly. Your belief that there might be big fish will be confirmed when one rolls or feeds (two entirely different propositions...). In my experience if you don't spook them - where you see one roll marks their exact position...

Once we've located them we simply toss a big fly up-current and across allowing it to sink near the bottom so that the fly is literally crossing almost in front of where they're holding before starting a long slow strip to get the fly moving across the area the fish are holding in. Do it just right and be holding onto that line since occasionally before you even start stripping a big fish will try to take it away from you...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A lesser known “nymphing” method is dead drifting a streamer or woolly bugger under an indicator. Deadly on big fish tail water. This sounds like it would work great on tidal creeks. You could throw it 60 feet upstream, let it come past you and then stack mend downstream. You can get a 120 foot drift. And you could do it with a 5 or 6 weight.
Thanks! This is the crux of my question and what I want to try. In my mind it should work great.
 

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As far as dead drifting a fly for redfish, it works...

I've done it quite a few times when redfish are stacked up in the winter. I wasn't using a nymph thou. It was a olive redfish crack or crab pattern with no indicator. I knew the bottom was nothing but mud so when the drift stopped I just set the hook. An indicator would be fun though.
 

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I've trout fished, "nymphing" as you call it, with and without an indicator. If I'm going to use an indicator, it will have a hook in it. I've had trout hit my indicator too many times. So I'm thinking a big gurgler, with a clouser or shrimp pattern dropper, just going with the flow.
Euro nymphing is basically what we did years ago, only we called it high sticking. Keep rod tip high and your line off the water, keeping direct contact with your nymph. I don't see this as on option for salt because you would be fishing only as far away from your boat as you could reach.
 
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