Dedicated To The Smallest Of Skiffs banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am good when working with epoxy, but I have a friend that is wanting to do some work with polyester resin.  I've read that most use un-waxed polyester resin and that it stays tacky in order for adhesion on the next coat of poly, paint or gel.  How does this effect sanding in-between coats? I would think a sticky resin would clog up sand paper pretty quick.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, but how do sand in-between coats if the resin stays tacky or is it really not that tacky enough to clog the grit of say 80 grit sandpaper?
 

·
Cert. Yamaha technician
Joined
·
4,330 Posts
The whole point of the no wax is so you don't have to sand inbetween coats if you do your next layer within the accepted window of time since the last layer.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If I'm filling a hole and using 3 layers of cloth to build it back up to match the existing and my patch it a little bigger than the whole, I'm used to sanding the patch around the edges to make it match. Will this gum up the paper? It's a painted hull and very thin at that. It would be nearly impossible to get the last patch to lay smooth and at the exact height of the surrounding area. Sorry for the confusion and I really do appreciate the help.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
838 Posts
I have been told not to sand it cause it will gum up the paper. That is why I bought epoxy. Can someone with more experience chime in please.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have been told not to sand it cause it will gum up the paper.  That is why I bought epoxy.  Can someone with more experience chime in please. 
I've seen were some have said to add wax to the final coat of poly.

I might tell my friend the only way I'm will to help is with epoxy. I redid my boat with west systems too. I built some parts with poly but did a final coat of epoxy because the rest of my boat was done with it.
 

·
Brandon, FL
Joined
·
11,125 Posts
Shallow, you will be fine. It might clog some but it won't be like sanding wet caulking.

Although epoxy is a better choice, many boats are repaired using esters.

If the hull is really thin then epoxy might be a poor choice as it flexes differently than ester.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Shallow, you will be fine.  It might clog some but it won't be like sanding wet caulking.

Although epoxy is a better choice, many boats are repaired using esters.

If the hull is really thin then epoxy might be a poor choice as it flexes differently than ester.
Thanks Ducknut, that's the answer I was hoping for. I just keep picturing sanding wet glue.
 

·
> PRO STAFF <
Joined
·
7,525 Posts
You can sand laminating polyester resin.
In fact it's often necessary on many layups, where an air bubble
forms between layers due to uneven tension in different sections
of the woven roving. Can't sand the laminating resin with fine grit.
On the few hulls I've had to re-stringer, a 36 grit disc
on an electric grinder removed the problem and feathered the edges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
i didn't add any wax and I didn't have any real issues with my build. As mentioned, sanding by hand isn't really an option unless you hate your arms...and yes you will go through some paper but its not THAT bad. Like DuckNut said...its not wet...just a little tacky from my experience. Not sure what he's using but I was using the FGCI Boatyard resin.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top