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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have to take some pics of a recent project we just completed, part was low voltage landscape lighting. I plan on taking photos before sunrise, with my Canon and a tripod. What shutter speed and iso would be a good starting point to produce a picture that would compliment the lighting? Also should I use the self timer option? Equipment is a Canon T1i and lens is a Canon EF 17-40 1:4 L USM, any help would be appreciated.
 

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I would suggest using ISO100 and a longer shutter speed. It will allow the lighting to fill the shadows better, and make it a little softer. I would use the self timer option. So when the shutter is released there is no shake or blur.

When you take the picture look at it carefully. Using the outside lighting of the location may help or hinder the quality of your picture. Be sure you have access to those light switches so you can shut them off if they are blowing out the exposure.
 

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There are a couple ways to go about getting interesting exposures. The first thing I do is use the timer function to stabilize the camera. If you hit the button by had you are bound to shake the camera. You can let the camera use the auto exposure settings to get close to the right lighting or you can go for a manual exposure and ISO setting. Another interesting method is to do a long manual exposure with a flash fill lighting up certain sections of the photo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would suggest using ISO100 and a longer shutter speed.  It will allow the lighting to fill the shadows better, and make it a little softer.  I would use the self timer option.  So when the shutter is released there is no shake or blur. 

When you take the picture look at it carefully.  Using the outside lighting of the location may help or hinder the quality of your picture.  Be sure you have access to those light switches so you can shut them off if they are blowing out the exposure. 
But the low voltage lighting is the reason for the pictures at night. There is no other ambient light. As far as shutter speed, start with a second? The time frame to get good pictures with a barely lit dark sky is very narrow.
 

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I have good results shooting bridges at night with: ISO 100, f/16 or f/22, 30" exposure. I have a remote release so I dont use a timer, although I have and it gets the same results. Use a tri-pod for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have good results shooting bridges at night with: ISO 100, f/16 or f/22, 30" exposure. I have a remote release so I dont use a timer, although I have and it gets the same results. Use a tri-pod for sure.
Thanks, will try tomorrow if it's not too windy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·




Thanks for the advice
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The pictures turned out okay for the first attempt. I'll probably have better success shooting at sunset as opposed to sunrise, really want that deep blue sky. I shot the pics with 100 iso, f13 and 30 sec shutter speed, I also bracketed each shot +/- 1.3.
 
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