Nida core

Discussion in 'Boat Yard Basics' started by lp99, Mar 21, 2013.

  1. lp99

    lp99 I Love microskiff.com!

    23
    0
    331
    Is it possible to use this and if so, is it any good compared to the other composites?
     
  2. jms

    jms don't let common sense get in your way

    462
    0
    141

    this is nida core:

    [​IMG]

    nida core is made from recycled milk jugs - i kid you not,it has a scrim backing,overtop of that honeycomb plastic...

    it's a very cheap product,it does not have the strength,or rigidity of a real composite core -like coosa/penske board...
    it will never hold a screw,as you can see...

    i treat that crap like kryptonite,other's,they swear by it...i will not use it for anything...
     

  3. lp99

    lp99 I Love microskiff.com!

    23
    0
    331
    Thanks kreepa I wondered why it was cheap but no one used it. Thinking about a front deck on the classic. I like your current build how would you go about building one over the current low deck?
     
  4. jms

    jms don't let common sense get in your way

    462
    0
    141

    you could make up bulkheads from the existing low deck - atach side "ledges" on the hull,measure out the area,cut and drop a deck ontop of that,then cut a hatch in the new deck,and have storage below it...

    that's what i would do  ;)
     
  5. lp99

    lp99 I Love microskiff.com!

    23
    0
    331
    Seems logical ha, never thought about that. What about taking out the hump on the back bench, should I try to use the top of the hump and fill the gaps or should I just "try" to reglass the top over the hole. Never done any fiberglass work before so trying to go basic but learn in the process.
     
  6. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

    1,167
    191
    918
    It's good for hard tops and decks. Light weight and cheap core material. Wouldn't build a hull with it though. The shear stress is only around 40psi. Compared to 5lb divynal which is 180psi
     
  7. hooked-up

    hooked-up I Love microskiff.com!

    34
    0
    81
    Its a good core material for certain uses. As CWright said its very good core for decks/hardtops--strong in compression. You can't compare coosa to nidacore to divinicell. All different with different strengths/weaknesses. Used in deck of skiff and is great and much less weight than okoume plywood. Used airex and divinicell for console and embedded okoume to mount steering, etc. I wouldn't trust any of these composites to hold screws. You'd never use nidacore for a bulkhead or transom but also it would be a waste of $$ and weight to use coosa for a shelf.
     
  8. oysterbreath

    oysterbreath Well-Known Member

    I know a couple of builders who have used it to build their soles. They had the same complaints that Kreepa pointed out. Their is one place where it shines though....if you are a bee keeper with some lazy bees.....

    OK OK, bad joke. ::)
     
  9. lp99

    lp99 I Love microskiff.com!

    23
    0
    331
    I see kreepa likes Penske/coosa, what about starboard? Pros, cons?
     
  10. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

    1,167
    191
    918
    You won't get a good bond between the glass and the starboard. It's too smooth. It will just peel off.

    Nida will work fine for your gheenoe deck. If you have never made a core'd composite before I highly suggest you go to a fiberglass shop and pay them to help you with the lay up. They probably will even have a mold you can use. If you don't do a good job bedding the core it will delaminate.
     
  11. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

    1,167
    191
    918
    Also, you can check out my fowl river 16 in the bragging section. The decks are 1/2" divynal cored with 1 layer of 1.5oz csm and one layer f 24oz woven on each side. They are tough as wood pecker lips. My front deck 5x5 is ~20lbs. Pm me and I will give you the scoop on getting a good lay up.
     
  12. DuckNut

    DuckNut Brandon, FL

    4,576
    440
    1,938
    Do not use starboard - period. That is not what it was made for.

    There are many products that will do what you want to do. Keep in mind that all of the synthetics will cost double+ the cost of wood.

    The foam boards would be a better choice than Nida for your project.

    Here is my suggestion: Since you are not too far away, drive to St. Pete and visit with FGCI. They will have what you need and the expertise to explain how to do it. Listen to them.

    www.fgci.com to get their address and phone.