New Skiff Design

Discussion in 'The Commercial Zone' started by Boatdesigner, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. Boatdesigner

    Boatdesigner I Love microskiff.com!

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    I have been lurking on the site off and on for a while and thought my new design, the Osprey 18, might be of interest. Here are the particulars:

    Length: 17'-7"
    Beam: 66"
    Draft: 6" to keel at full displacement
    Displacement: 1300 pounds
    Fuel: 12 gals.

    [​IMG]

    She is designed for cold-molded wood construction, although you should probably be an accomplished woodworker or have built boats before as she could be tricky to build. Her plans cost $85 with patterns on a CD. If you want the full-size patterns printed, then it brings the price up to $145.

    [​IMG]

    Visit my website for more information!

    Timm Smith
    Smith Marine Design
    PO Box 399
    Crystal River, FL 34423
    352-465-3123

    http://www.smithmarinedesign.com

    My email address is on the Contact page of the website, feel free to contact me if you have any questions!
     
  2. anytide

    anytide Administrator Staff Member

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    welcome aboard!!-capt. and coke please
          nice designs!!-wood is good                     -anytide
     

  3. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    welcome,good looking boat
     
  4. jimbarn1961

    jimbarn1961 GOT FEESH?

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    Any finished boats out there yet? HINT, HIN?T, pics would be cool :cool: what is HP rating? speed etc.
    Welcome aboard, Capt. and Coke please :)
     
  5. Gramps

    Gramps Living & Dying in 3/4 Time

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    32knots
    40hp 4stroke tiller ;)


    Is the construction stitch and glue or strip? The referenced 7oz cloth, biax or woven? It seems like a combination of both...
     
  6. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Gramps...stop looking at the pretty pictures! ;)
    I mean, yeah, it's great boat porn,
    but there's text between them there pictures!

     
  7. Gramps

    Gramps Living &amp; Dying in 3/4 Time

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    You just drove home my point Brett:

    Is 2" as large as possible or 3.5'?

      It's a 7oz cloth, is it biax or woven?  ;D

    I read the pretty words and I'm very intrigued!  :cool:
     
  8. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Strip is a longitudinal construction technique.
     
  9. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Cold molding runs panels diagonally across the stringers.
     
  10. wcnfl

    wcnfl Well-Known Member

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    What would you estimate the materials to cost on this project?
     
  11. Gramps

    Gramps Living &amp; Dying in 3/4 Time

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    Ah that makes sense now and looks easier! Thanks Brett! :D
     
  12. jimbarn1961

    jimbarn1961 GOT FEESH?

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    Gramps,

    Where did I miss the speed? I feel stupid or are you just that smart :D
     
  13. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    http://www.smithmarinedesign.com/osprey18.html

    Ya'll gotta stop eyeballin' the pics and read more! ;D
     
  14. jimbarn1961

    jimbarn1961 GOT FEESH?

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    I know, I know, My name is Jim I am a Boat Pornaholic ;D

    That is one sexy looking boat though
     
  15. Boatdesigner

    Boatdesigner I Love microskiff.com!

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    Hi everyone, sorry I haven't replied to your questions sooner. I have been busy the last couple of days responding to inquiries about this design! This design has not been built yet. It was a custom design for a client and since he has not paid his bill, he doesn't have permission to build the boat. In taking the commission, I gave him a super deal with the hope that I could sell some stock plans later to make up for my initial losses. As it stands I have made less than $3 an hour for my time. Who says being a boat designer isn't a profitable career! ;D

    I haven't estimated the costs to build the boat yet, but I do know how much material is actually in the hull from my weight study. It will take me some time to add up the various parts and then try to guesstimate the number of sheets of plywood it will take to build it. This is a bit tricky as one builder may be better at utilizing his materials than another. Once I get some time I'll try to put together an estimate.

    Regarding the strip sizes, on much of the bottom and the topsides back aft, they can be as wide as the plywood. As you move forward and the hull develops more flare, they will have to get progressively narrower. In the topsides all the way forward, they may be only a few inches wide. It is hard to see in the images I have put up on the web, but this boat has quite a bit of flare up forward. I should take a little time and add another image showing that to my website. You can see it in the machinery arrangement study plan.

    I am actually glad I put the boat up here. In looking at the weight study spreadsheat to estimate the materials a little, I noticed I had added the weight of the transom and hull bottom in twice. Her actual weight is really 1150 pounds, not 1300. Bare hull weight is about 400 pounds. At that weight she draws a half inch less water.

    Now I have a question! I think it would be easier to build this boat out of foam cored fiberglass. Many people prefer working with wood, but with all the glass and epoxy in a cold molded boat, you're still working with a lot of goop. So if you were to consider building a boat like this for yourself, would you prefer an all glass boat or a cold molded boat? Please note I am not talking about a production boat, but a one-off garage/backyard build. Thanks for all the comments! Your thoughts will help me refine this design and possibly some others, like a smaller version at around 16'.
     
  16. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    If I was serious about building this design, I think it would be all fiberglass.
    I'd set up the framing and run the stringers, then staple wire mesh to the stringers.
    Gypsum plaster and a trowel to skim coat the mesh, then after the gypsum dried
    get out the long board and sand fair. When complete it would be a one-off mold.
    After studying the Cadd images, working those complex curves in wood,
    would be too time consuming, and the fairing afterwards even more  work.
    I'd rather do my sanding on the gypsum plaster, before glassing,
    as sandpaper cuts gypsum plaster with little effort.
    Trying to fair the epoxy/plywood cold molding would be hard work.
     
  17. Gramps

    Gramps Living &amp; Dying in 3/4 Time

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    Thanks for the response BD. I am always interested in boat designs and would agree right here and now to buy the first 16' skiff plans.  For me 16' is a key length due to storage issues.  On another designers site he is not so nice when you ask for a redesign of an existing 18' boat to 16'. Ok I'm rambling.

    For the construction I would not be interested in foam core, it is not worth it to me.  Wood is easy, cheaper, and provides a solid structure without fiberglass/epoxy.

    Oh and a WAG on the materials price; including all sundries and consumables (sand paper, hand tools, dunnage, saw blades, etc.) it would be $3,500-4,000.
     
  18. wcnfl

    wcnfl Well-Known Member

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    Brett what size wire mesh?

    Have you ever built a hull mold from the wire mesh method ?
     
  19. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    I used #3 hardware cloth (wire mesh) to build a mold off of a 14 foot lapstrake dory.
    The dory had been left in the rear of Nuta's Boatyard (now Jones Hurricane Cove)
    and was buried in trash and debris when we found it. The brass plate
    on the transom Identified it as a product of the Rasmussen Yachtwerks.
    After getting permission from the yard boss we cleared the hull and slid it on a trailer.
    After cleaning it off what we had was an oak framed and lapstrake planked, wine glass transomed rowing dory.
    Flipped it over and rebraced the hull to as true as we could get it, then stapled wire mesh all over the hull.
    8 bags of gypsum plaster later we had coated the hull and filled all the laps to a rounded hull shape.
    A weeks worth of sanding and we had a faired hull. Sprayed it with tooling gelcoat
    and after much more sanding and polishing built a mold.
    I got the first hull out of the mold and turned it into a sailboat.
     
  20. Boatdesigner

    Boatdesigner I Love microskiff.com!

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    Gramps, I was guessing the same thing, but didn't want to go out on a limb!

    Brett, it sounds like you wouldn't want a cored hull. With a cored hull you would cover the framework with foam core and then glass and fair it. Then you can flip it over and glass the inside. There used to be a way to build solid hulls using a Formica female mold, but I imagine trying to put the Formica down on the inside of the framing would be a nightmare! It would give you a smooth gel surface on the outside though.
     
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