May I request a brief schooling on exterior hull finishes?

Discussion in 'Boat Yard Basics' started by SClay115, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    So with the coming job of refinishing the hull exterior of the Johnsen skiff, I've been doing some digging on finishes. Like a part of the human anatomy, it seems that regarding that subject, everyone has an opinion, and obviously, everyone is right.

    I ask the question to you folks then, with some background on the situation, hopefully I can get some sort of clear answer that would fit for my plan.

    Hull problem in question:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The damage on either side of the bow is from a poorly set up trailer, which is going to be taken care of while the boat is off of it. And the damage on the keel is from beaching on some not so sandy shore lines.

    I had originally planned to simply sand down the front quarter of the hull, up to the water line, fill any physical damage with marine tex, sand smooth, and apply a roll on bedliner to front quarter of the underside. I am considering this option since the rest of the hull is fine, as in no damage. And while underway, that portion of the hull is out of the water anyways, so there would be no increased drag. This also appealed to me since it would be quick, easy, prevent any more damage like this from happening, and simple enough to do without a garage, of which I do not have. The difficulty removing it in the long run has me concerned however. Although, if it does it's job, when I refinish the hull I could simply apply the new finish over it.

    However, eventually, I would like to go through the entire hull(interior/exterior), I say eventually, but I really mean sometime next year. And I think to myself, "How in the world am I going to remove that bedliner material?" If that is even possible without damaging the fiberglass. So it got me thinking about other possible finishes. I have read of Rustoleum marine paint being used with good results, even standard Rustoleum, with the usage of some add in hardener that is purchased separately. With that, I would want to implement some sort of keel protection, that could be determined later. With this option however, I would be inclined to do the entire hull, as the color would not match, and I would at least need to do the bottom half(black), at that point there would be no reason to not do from the water line up to the gunnel(white), making it all one color. I am just not sure if that is something that would make sense attempting with no garage. I could end up purchasing one of those standalone tents that could cover the work area. But in this case, the boat is not on my property, and I am doing my best not to turn the area where it is located into a boatyard, trying to at least....

    Another option, although not one I am really considering, is one of the far more expensive marine specific finishes. While yielding a very strong and smooth finish, it wouldn't make much sense for me in this situation, so I have mostly ruled that out, both cost, and practicality wise.

    What would you folks say is the best option? I am doing my best not to turn this into a huge project. But the more I look into it, the more my thoughts go to the "Well if I'm going to go this far, I might as well do this too" sort of thinking. Which isn't bad so to speak, just not something I am looking to undertake at this moment.

    Steve
     
  2. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    There aren't any good finishes for a boat used in shell/rocks that gets beached regularly.
    The hull is going to get chewed up. Use it, fix it, use it some more.
    Expensive paint or cheap paint, it won't matter.
     

  3. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    I try not to make it too regular, but I do understand what you mean. Which was my general thoughts on not wanting to spend some 150 bones per quart on marine paint. Made a quick stop to the seemingly notoriously more expensive West Marine today, and was just blown away by the prices. So I am thinking inexpensive, get back on the water.

    Steve
     
  4. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    You can always go with rattle can camo.
    Simple to touch up when you do scratch it,
    looks good on the water.

    Cheap and easy... :-?
     
  5. DuckNut

    DuckNut Brandon, FL

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    Sand, fill scrapes, sand smooth and paint. In your part of the bay you will hit oysters so cheap is good. BLP Mobile Paints are very good paints in my book and are cheap. There is a store (American Paint Supplies) on Taylor Road in Naples.

    Please do not use bed liner on the outside of your hull.
     
  6. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    I had considered bedliner initially, but really upon further review, it sounded ridiculous to even consider removing the stuff if I ever wanted to refinish it. I didn't even want to think about what I'd do if I somehow got water in between the liner and the glass. That would be a mess.

    Thanks for the retailer suggestion, I will check them out.

    And Brett, no camo for me, but thanks for the suggestion.

    Steve
     
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