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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m currently looking at a few of the moonshine rods, and a few of the marsh fly rods.
Does anyone have any advice on good rods? First time getting into fly fishing, thanks for the advice ahead of time.
 

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These days, it's hard to find a rod that isn't decently castable for even the shortest money. Certainly almost any $100 rod today is lighter and more responsive than what I used coming up the ranks some 25 years back. Heck, I've cast $50 combo's that would leave you smiling.
My advice is to forget about the brand name game and look at your needs as the driver.
What will you be fishing for (and where) should be your first focus. If your going to do different kinds of fishing, you may need more than one rod (or understand your limitations anyway.)
From there get a set-up that is usable but not expensive to start. $150-$350 goes a long way in todays market. Buying the wrong "in vogue" rod for $800 still makes it the wrong rod ( that is worth 1/2 of what you paid for it once it leaves the shop.). It's important that your first rod match's what fishing you want to do with it AND that it is "casting friendly" . Cast the outfit first if you can. If you can't, consider a kit from one of the better outdoor retailers so that it can be returned if you hate it/ buy the wrong thing. (Cabelas , Bean or Orvis comes to mind.). Get some casting lessons. Pay if you have too. Casting lessons will do more to improve your casting / enjoyment than putting money into "better" equipment. Once your casting is refined, you'll know better what style rod action fits you. Find a club if you can. Lots of good advice, free lessons and even used gear abounds at any FF club. If you like FF, get ready for a long and enjoyable ride!

FWIW I currently own dozens of rods that represent pretty much all of the known companies. ( Loomis, Sage, St. Croix, Douglas, Echo, T&T, Scott, Winston, East Fork, Hardy,TFO, Redington, Cabelas, Cortland, Moonshine, Bass Pro, LLbean, Orvis, Maxcatch....) Some are very high end, some cost me less than a tank of gas. All have their own personalities. All would be plenty good to learn on.
Tight Lines.
 

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I have an Orvis Encounter I bought a couple years ago when I was getting back into fly fishing. It’s a great setup for around 175 bucks or so. I broke it just past the second eye below the tip. Although this line is not covered under their lifetime warranty they still replaced it for me no questions asked. I’ve always thought their gear was a little overpriced but with that kind of service they earned a customer for life. The Clearwater is their saltwater equivalent and starts around 220-225. I plan to get a couple of those too as I get more into saltwater fly fishing. I have a TFO also with a Cabela’s reel off of one of their combos. TFO is as good as anything out there as far as I’m concerned. Like others have said the most important thing is to understand what type of fishing you will be doing most and match your line to that. Also if you have a reputable fly shop near you go in and see those guys. Most of them are gonna be real friendly and eager to help. A good shop isn’t going to try and load you up with the most expensive gear they have and their personnel will most likely take you out in the parking lot and spend some time with you showing you how to cast. Keep it simple in beginning. Don’t let it all overwhelm or intimidate you. And welcome to the Dark Side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Right now I’m living In Florida so I’m mainly creek fishing for bream and bass, or saltwater fishing. So I’m looking for a good rod for either scenario. I plan on moving to Wyoming in a year or two also so I’m gonna look at having a good trout rod too. I plan on taking the Orvis fly fishing class so I’ll probably check them out while I’m there.
 

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If you have a friend who fly fishes don't feel bad to use their stuff. Almost any rod can get you started and before investing in a true top of the line set up it is helpful knowing what kind of action you like. I was lucky enough to learn from some friends who are guides, I got to use their gear and get a feel for what I liked. Now I have rods for Scott, Loomis, Edge, and St Croix. I have bought used rods off of this site in great condition for good prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Honestly I don’t even know anyone here who fly fishes. North Florida is mainly into saltwater and bass fishing. There isn’t a guy in Tallahassee who has a stocked pond full of rainbows so I’m thinking about going out there and seeing what I can pick up.
 

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Right now I’m living In Florida so I’m mainly creek fishing for bream and bass, or saltwater fishing. So I’m looking for a good rod for either scenario. I plan on moving to Wyoming in a year or two also so I’m gonna look at having a good trout rod too. I plan on taking the Orvis fly fishing class so I’ll probably check them out while I’m there.
Saltwater rods work in freshwater, I use my scott s4s out here in Colorado and Wyoming, but freshwater rods not so good in saltwater, It is not the blank itself but the hardware(guides, reel seat) that is different material. Standard out west is 5 or 6 wt, which will serve you well for bass and bream.
 

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There are some world class guides south of you in the panhandle area but lessons probably damn expensive. I though on a post somewhere on here somebody mentioned a casting class or instructor that seemed reasonable. It may be worth your while to try to find someone or a class.
 

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Fly rods are like golf clubs. It's hard to pick one and be thrilled with the performance over an entire 18 holes. So if you want to do Brim Bass and Sw with one rod, that could be a tall order due to varing conditions and fly size . ( Remember it's the line weight that casts the fly.) Brim fishing involves small fish and smallish (size 12-8) flies. To be fun, your going to want a rod that's light action. Something in a 3-5wt. For LMB and SW, yo are going to likely fish bigger and bulkier flies ( #10- 3/0) to bigger fish. Sometimes in thick cover. That usually calls for something in the 7-9 wt.
All that said, a 9' 6 wt will get the job done to start. It's also a good size to learn on. That would allow you to fish brim flies and bass /SW up into the #1/0 range. Eventualy,you'll likely want to add a 4 and 8 wt .
 

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I suggest going to your local fly shop and ask to cast a few rods. Try more than one brand and try rods with different "actions". If you end up buying a rod locally you will benefit in more ways than one.

Faster rods will take more line to load but will punch flies into the wind better than slower rods. Slower rods are usually more accurate and forgiving, especially at closer targets. All things considered, I prefer a fast rod and a heavy tip weight-forward line for windy flats. I also carry a slower "action" rod for calm days and working tailing fish.
 
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