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Lake Ingram

3128 Views 57 Replies 20 Participants Last post by  James Humphrey
For those that haven’t been there, or been there during high tide where it actually looks like a lake/big buddy of water, this is it during a low tide. The fishing can be very active since most fish end up concentrated in these channels. We didn’t catch anything big this time out, but plenty of these little guys. Plus there were a few crocodiles to look at up on the banks.
Water Sky Lake Fisherman Fish
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Lake Ingram has changed quite a bit since I was introduced to it around 1976… The real trouble is the entrance (or exit) at Middle Cape which has gotten wider and wider over the years- particularly since hurricane Wilma in 2005. If something isn’t done Ingram will gradually disappear over time… At present the opening at Middle Cape is at least three or four times bigger than when I first fished it all those years ago…. Wish it weren’t so.
Unfortunately, it looks as if rising sea levels will eventually claim the area. Isn’t that why the Park Service is building/built/rebuilt the dams? They’re supposed to be the stop gap to head off the process man put in effect the many years ago?
Remember reading that when East Cape Canal was first dug, you could jump across it. And, that Ingram was a natural freshwater lake/estuary…
 

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Every part of Florida's ecosystems have been negatively affected by what the Army Corps of Engineers (and Chamber of Commerce) did for decades, and the efforts to repair as much of the damage as possible are taking a back seat to population growth and development.
No doubt. The ditches/canals are remnants of Flagler’s efforts to drain the Cape Sable area for agriculture and land development back in the early 1900’s…
 

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“The incursion of saltwater into formerly freshwater marsh systems as the result of sea level rise has also led to physical collapse of the marshes. This process has been accelerated on Cape Sable by saltwater moving through the canals past the marl ridge and through the smaller canals where the plugs have failed. Sediment, and probably nutrients, from the collapsed marsh also make their way to Florida Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Replacing the failed plugs is expected to slow the rate of marsh collapse and the loss of sediment and nutrients from the interior marshes of Cape Sable (URS Corporation 2009).”
 

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You really have to look at any information provided by government sources as suspect. They have earned our distrust honestly, lol.

The marsh collapsing or sinking due to erosion, man-made depletion of and/or changes to the Biscayne Aquifer, massive movement of sediment, additional tidal saltwater intrusion and stronger currents from man-made canals, make more sense than the BS narrative about climate change or sea levels rising.
Dude, GTF out with that nonsense. You and Smack too bored in your Off Section echo chamber that ya gotta pull the conspiracy bs here now? Again, I’m not disagreeing that erosion is the issue. I’m just saying, along with the data, that the two go hand and hand…
I also did not get into why the sea levels are rising. God forbid we have that discussion on this forum. Just that we know, with scientific evidence, that they are. And no, sorry—some guy on the internet who lives in BFE Texas telling me his local ramp has been at the same water level ever since he started boating does not count as irrefutable evidence that the sea level is not rising…
 
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