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You're not riding her hard enough...:geek:
Not it, his skeg is above the bottom of hull when jacked up. Like, way up there!馃槈
 
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If you need to run faster than that to catch fish there鈥檚 something wrong! You can鈥檛 troll a fly that fast, I鈥檝e tried.
Eh, wahoo like it when you troll on plane!馃槈
 
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I鈥檓 a 25-26 mph kinda guy.
Yup...jacked up, trimmed out, and WOT I'm normally somewhere between 30-33mph depending on wind direction.

But I normally back off a bit for comfort (prop torque on the tiller) and cruise in the upper 20s.
 

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Need a prop with cupping. Will prevent cavitation without the need for a cav plate. IMO, if you need a cav plate, motor is setup wrong or prop is wrong
Not necessarily true in all cases....

A cav plate goes above the prop to prevent wash out. It does not wrap the entire engine like a compression plate.

A compression plate, like the ShawWing, wraps the entire lower unit. It helps with wash out, but also channels water downward to surround the prop and water pick ups.

I've had both on my B2 - it came with a cav plate and was pretty much useless, imo. It did nothing for increasing water pressure or allowing me to get up skinny. I took it off and did a trip - I could tell no difference.

The compression plate, on the other hand, has been killer. I was able to raise my engine to the highest bolt and can run with jack plate at 5.5 while keeping water pressure (it drops at 6). It has changed where I fish and how skinny I can get up.

But, I currently don't have a tunnel. Tunnels channel water more effectively to the engine, so one could argue if a compression plate is useful.

However, I had a boat that was a tunnel and I also had a compression plate. I could run so skinny in areas that if I stopped, I would probably still be there trying to get the boat out. :). The combination of a tunnel and compression allowed me to run the prop nearly above the water line. Awesome, but can get you into some trouble if not careful.

The heavy cup will help with bite getting up shallow, and help prevent wash out, but it depends on how high you are jacked up. Even a heavy cup has limitations with a tunnel - there is a point where there isn't enough water surrounding even the heavy cup and it will blow out. This is where a compression plate would help eliminate that issue.

Also, I run a Jack Foreman 3 blade prop with heavy cup on my B2.
 

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Not necessarily true in all cases....

A cav plate goes above the prop to prevent wash out. It does not wrap the entire engine like a compression plate.

A compression plate, like the ShawWing, wraps the entire lower unit. It helps with wash out, but also channels water downward to surround the prop and water pick ups.

I've had both on my B2 - it came with a cav plate and was pretty much useless, imo. It did nothing for increasing water pressure or allowing me to get up skinny. I took it off and did a trip - I could tell no difference.

The compression plate, on the other hand, has been killer. I was able to raise my engine to the highest bolt and can run with jack plate at 5.5 while keeping water pressure (it drops at 6). It has changed where I fish and how skinny I can get up.

But, I currently don't have a tunnel. Tunnels channel water more effectively to the engine, so one could argue if a compression plate is useful.

However, I had a boat that was a tunnel and I also had a compression plate. I could run so skinny in areas that if I stopped, I would probably still be there trying to get the boat out. :). The combination of a tunnel and compression allowed me to run the prop nearly above the water line. Awesome, but can get you into some trouble if not careful.

The heavy cup will help with bite getting up shallow, and help prevent wash out, but it depends on how high you are jacked up. Even a heavy cup has limitations with a tunnel - there is a point where there isn't enough water surrounding even the heavy cup and it will blow out. This is where a compression plate would help eliminate that issue.

Also, I run a Jack Foreman 3 blade prop with heavy cup on my B2.
I agree 100% with this, I guess my point is that it seems that way too often, people slap a cav plate or ShawWing on an improperly set up motor as a band-aid fix. Doing so will prevent cavitation and washing out, yes, and allow a skiff to run stupid skinny, but at the expense of proper performance
 

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I agree 100% with this, I guess my point is that it seems that way too often, people slap a cav plate or ShawWing on an improperly set up motor as a band-aid fix. Doing so will prevent cavitation and washing out, yes, and allow a skiff to run stupid skinny, but at the expense of proper performance
When you say performance, what aspect are you referring to?

Here in Texas we compromise heavy cup with compression plates so we can get to the fish, in and out without tearing up the habitat and not wasting too much time (different value to all of us) getting in and out of locations. If you run back to some places far enough and realize you need to move. It may mean poling a very long way to get out or tearing up equipment / habitat or both.

So for me it鈥檚 three components, picking up water, getting good compression and finding a properly cupped prop while sacrificing some top end speed.

Oh and proper tunnel design, of course.
 

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When you say performance, what aspect are you referring to?

Here in Texas we compromise heavy cup with compression plates so we can get to the fish, in and out without tearing up the habitat and not wasting too much time (different value to all of us) getting in and out of locations. If you run back to some places far enough and realize you need to move. It may mean poling a very long way to get out or tearing up equipment / habitat or both.

So for me it鈥檚 three components, picking up water, getting good compression and finding a properly cupped prop while sacrificing some top end speed.

Oh and proper tunnel design, of course.
Sounds like yours isn鈥檛 a band-aid. Y鈥檃ll Texas guys need em to run crazy skinny, but like you said you sacrifice top end. But there鈥檚 many variables to setting up a propeller, such as blade size, diameter, shape, count, cupping, pitch, and so on. People seem to use a generic prop and throw on a ShawWing to prevent cavitation when they really need a different prop.

That鈥檚 when performance issues seem to arise, like top end, sliding in turns, porpoising and such.

Of course though, there are uses, like yours, where when combined with proper prop and engine mounting that a ShawWing is very important to proper running.
 

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Sounds like yours isn鈥檛 a band-aid. Y鈥檃ll Texas guys need em to run crazy skinny, but like you said you sacrifice top end. But there鈥檚 many variables to setting up a propeller, such as blade size, diameter, shape, count, cupping, pitch, and so on. People seem to use a generic prop and throw on a ShawWing to prevent cavitation when they really need a different prop.

That鈥檚 when performance issues seem to arise, like top end, sliding in turns, porpoising and such.

Of course though, there are uses, like yours, where when combined with proper prop and engine mounting that a ShawWing is very important to proper running.
Is 2-3 mph really a huge sacrifice for not having to pussy foot a hole shot or run with the prop up without blowing out?
 

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Is 2-3 mph really a huge sacrifice for not having to pussy foot a hole shot or run with the prop up without blowing out?
Is 2-3 mph really a huge sacrifice for not having to pussy foot a hole shot or run with the prop up without blowing out?
Well with the right prop, you won鈥檛 blow out, and you鈥檒l retain those 2-3 mph so I鈥檇 say yes, except for the instances where both are needed.

But you guys still aren鈥檛 getting my damn point.

With the exception of extreme circumstances, there should be absolutely zero cavitation problems, there should be good hole shot and also good top end.

That all comes down to rigging.

UNLESS, very shallow running is your top priority

Where I come from, you don鈥檛 dare burn a flat. The shallowest I run is rarely less than a foot.

I have my motor mounted high, I have a jackplate and can run it almost 5鈥 up before cavitation. Still achieve 30+ mph with a 40hp, hole shot puts you in your seat, doesn鈥檛 slide in turns and so on.

With my old prop, it slid, porpoised, hole shot was 2-3 business days and top end was about the same.
 

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Well with the right prop, you won鈥檛 blow out, and you鈥檒l retain those 2-3 mph so I鈥檇 say yes, except for the instances where both are needed.

But you guys still aren鈥檛 getting my damn point.

With the exception of extreme circumstances, there should be absolutely zero cavitation problems, there should be good hole shot and also good top end.

That all comes down to rigging.

UNLESS, very shallow running is your top priority

Where I come from, you don鈥檛 dare burn a flat. The shallowest I run is rarely less than a foot.

I have my motor mounted high, I have a jackplate and can run it almost 5鈥 up before cavitation. Still achieve 30+ mph with a 40hp, hole shot puts you in your seat, doesn鈥檛 slide in turns and so on.

With my old prop, it slid, porpoised, hole shot was 2-3 business days and top end was about the same.
I know what goes on where you come from and I know a bit about props, compression plates, boats and how to run them.
What鈥檚 your view on trim tabs, jack plates and tunnels?
 

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I know what goes on where you come from and I know a bit about props, compression plates, boats and how to run them.
What鈥檚 your view on trim tabs, jack plates and tunnels?
That鈥檚 kinda what I鈥檓 getting at, with tabs down a little, jackplate up, I鈥檒l can run as skinny as I鈥檇 ever want to. I have run in 8鈥 before.

With that being said, I understand that some people need to run in less. You guys in TX blow my mind haha! But that鈥檚 when it seems that in combination with a tunnel, the right prop and a jackplate, a cav or compression plate is an essential piece to the puzzle.

I also don鈥檛 want it to come across that I鈥檓 saying the plates are useless or won鈥檛 fix a cavitation issue.

It鈥檚 that I think in [most] scenarios there shouldn鈥檛 be cavitation in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
I鈥檒l chime in with hopes for clarification too. I feel my skiff is set-up pretty damn good with out a cavatation plate, I would need someone to ride with me to tell me if there was room for improvement, or things I might not have noticed yet while running.
 

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Sounds like yours isn鈥檛 a band-aid. Y鈥檃ll Texas guys need em to run crazy skinny, but like you said you sacrifice top end. But there鈥檚 many variables to setting up a propeller, such as blade size, diameter, shape, count, cupping, pitch, and so on. People seem to use a generic prop and throw on a ShawWing to prevent cavitation when they really need a different prop.

That鈥檚 when performance issues seem to arise, like top end, sliding in turns, porpoising and such.

Of course though, there are uses, like yours, where when combined with proper prop and engine mounting that a ShawWing is very important to proper running.
Sliding in turns is where skiff design comes in. I personally don鈥檛 care about running 33-34 vs 36-38. Even if I were to move to Florida, I would still want that capability.

Also, it will help with grass getting destroyed which I have seen personally with guides in Florida. IMO
 

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I went out and ran my boat before and after raising it to the highest bolt on the jack plate and got video. I also spent time talking in person with Kevin at Stiffy about his ShawWing - he was so excited and convinced I'd love it that he offered to install it with me right then and there. But, I needed to cut the underside of the plate to pull off the diode and access one of the bolts on the lower unit.

For a non tunnel, I would definitely recommend a compression plate (again, not a cav plate, those are smaller and don't do the same job as a compression plate).

One other thing to consider is setback of the engine. This doesn't apply to all boats, but primarily does to non-tunnels.

Congrats @scissorhands on the new rig - if I am ever in your area, I'll ping you - maybe we can hook up for a beer and maybe fish together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
I went out and ran my boat before and after raising it to the highest bolt on the jack plate and got video. I also spent time talking in person with Kevin at Stiffy about his ShawWing - he was so excited and convinced I'd love it that he offered to install it with me right then and there. But, I needed to cut the underside of the plate to pull off the diode and access one of the bolts on the lower unit.

For a non tunnel, I would definitely recommend a compression plate (again, not a cav plate, those are smaller and don't do the same job as a compression plate).

One other thing to consider is setback of the engine. This doesn't apply to all boats, but primarily does to non-tunnels.

Congrats @scissorhands on the new rig - if I am ever in your area, I'll ping you - maybe we can hook up for a beer and maybe fish together.
Definitely give me a ring if you are in the area.
 

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UNLESS, very shallow running is your top priority

Where I come from, you don鈥檛 dare burn a flat. The shallowest I run is rarely less than a foot.
Yeah...I need to be able to get over shoals and bars that can be in the neighborhood of 3-4"...and I can spend all day in less than 12" of water during the winter.

We cherish the grass we have. Luckily the grass only really grows in areas that stay wet even on the lowest of low tides. (Learning to read that detail can help you find fish...)

So we try to jump up and run over the sandy / muddy portions. It all comes down to knowing your local water and where you can run safely without damaging your boat or the bottom.
 
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