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Discussion Starter #1
Those of you with game how do you approach a deal without offending a seller ? "No low ballers" I know the age of the listing is a factor but do you offer a percentage off the asking price or go by instinct while speaking to the seller ? Any insight is appreciated
 

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Personally I think it varies. Some folks are realistic about values other people are not. I’m not sure why some people are so insulted by offers, I mean you can go make an offer on a brand new mercedes just like on a Chevy they may not accept it but you can get deals
 

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Do your homework and get the used book prices etc..... "I can only afford to offer you $$$$$$ I know it is a nice boat etc......everyone saves face

What not to do......take out a wad of hundreds and flip the bills in the wad in the guys face...............yup...a guys wife did it to me....walked
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is there a reliable source for used prices on boats ? This is really interesting because I will be shopping for my retirement boat towards the end of the year .

I hear you on flashing the bills . I had some guys waving 8g worth of 20$ bills in front of me once trying to lowball me on my old Vette Ha!

Do your homework and get the used book prices etc..... "I can only afford to offer you $$$$$$ I know it is a nice boat etc......everyone saves face

What not to do......take out a wad of hundreds and flip the bills in the wad in the guys face...............yup...a guys wife did it to me....walked
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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If you're worried its low ball, then it probably is.

Why not just make what you consider to be a fair offer and stand by it?
 

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When I bought my Action Craft from a private seller, he had it listed at about market value for the boat if it was in really good shape. After I saw that it needed about $5000 in upgrades and repairs to get it into the shape that I wanted, I didn't want to insult him with a low offer, but he asked me what I thought of the boat. I politely walked around the boat and showed him all the stuff that was wrong with the boat and what it would cost to fix it. He then asked me to make an offer and I did well below his asking price and he accepted it. Sometimes when you own something you think it is worth more than it really is until someone points it out to you.
 

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When I sold my pathfinder I posted it at what I believed was a fair price, stood by that price and eventually took the ad down and reposted it 2K higher. Folks buying used either think you need the money, so you will settle, or they won’t buy unless they think they got a deal. The irony is when those people come back willing to pay the asking price and the item has been sold, they seem to get a little butt hurt.
Kind of satisfying.
 

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Carpe Diem
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I've bought and sold a lot of boats. A seller who says "no lowballers" is very foolish. People who sell for a living know that you need to do everything you can to get customers in the door. Ever see a car dealership with a "no lowballers" sign? Once the customer is there, then real negotiations can begin.

To be clear: I will show a boat to anyone who comes to look, but until they've made a serious indication they're ready to buy at an agreed to price, I won't give any sea trials.
 

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Offer the lowest price you can find for similar and drop that another 20%. Seller is going to come back with a higher number so you should end up with near that lowest market value. And sellers add/bolted on crap has no value. Neither do any comments like there are not many this color or it gets shallower than most boats.
True story. I was selling a piece of furniture for a hundred bucks. Guy offered me 20. I told him I would have more fun running it over than getting $20 for it. So I backed my truck right over it.
 

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Fly Fishing Shaman
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Guys, value plays a big part in the market today. The term "no Low Ballers" is a way to ward off tire kickers and hone into people who are serious, because the boat owner knows they have built-in "value" into their rig. The days of listing it up too high and allowing them to negotiate you down, are a thing of the past and really savvy sellers and buyers will know if the boat is priced right according to what the market for what they have into it (less some depreciation), according to what it is, the value of it, the condition it is in and what the buyer's needs and what he considers "value" to them. Otherwise, if people list their boats up too high, it will get overlooked. If they list it too low, people will know there is a problem with it and to look, but air on caution.

As someone here said on this thread, do your homework. Book prices can be tossed out the window, because a seller can have add-ons and features on the boat that can cost as much as the boat itself (i.e. custom trailers, electronics, power poles, jack plates, push poles, high end batteries, trim tabs, casting platforms, upgraded outboards, low hours, custom boat covers, upgraded trolling motors, etc.). Also how it was stored and maintained can be the difference on the over-all value of the boat.

You can take a look at all those values, the condition of the boat, then get a feel on it, if the seller is negotiable on the price or not, based on his/hers motivation to sell it or not, without insulting the guy because you just threw out some low ball offer. In today's market, there are many boats that are priced right (especially well maintain used skiffs, like with many who frequent this website). In other words, you may lose a good deal on a boat because you are brow beating a guy on the price, while the next guy is finding that boat to be a good deal and he's ready to buy it.

So do your homework/research/legwork, ask people "in the know" and know what you want and the values of what it offers and see if you can meet the guy in the middle of where you can both agree on, and that's when you know you have a deal or not.

Ted
 

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I sold my boat for a less than I wanted. It was on the market too long so I settled for a lower price. The original offer made was a low ball offer and then the second offer was fair. Because I went a little lower and sold it when I did, I was able to pick up a good deal on another boat which was priced below market value.
 

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Offer the lowest price you can find for similar and drop that another 20%. Seller is going to come back with a higher number so you should end up with near that lowest market value. And sellers add/bolted on crap has no value. Neither do any comments like there are not many this color or it gets shallower than most boats.
True story. I was selling a piece of furniture for a hundred bucks. Guy offered me 20. I told him I would have more fun running it over than getting $20 for it. So I backed my truck right over it.
Good point on consoles above.

Being able to access a console from a door that swings upwards from the front is very, very nice. There is always more room in front of the console than between the back of a console and and the bench seat.

However, I've only seen it on some larger bay boats which is kind of odd being that it would be even more important on a small skiff.
That's that some dumb shit there. Now you have to pick it up out of the driveway and dispose of it. You would have been better off donating it to Salvation Army and claiming double your $100 asking price on taxes for a $50 deduction (depending on your tax bracket), and have someone come get it while you sit on the sofa with a beer.

Btw, if you were to low ball me 20% below the lowest one you could find, I would just say "No" and not counter offer because you're not serious. My counter (if any) is not based upon some median of your lowball offer and my asking price.
 
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