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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My skiff driving history entails only the upper gulf coast, minimal tidal swings compared to the SC area...previously having a skiff that drafted say 2" less than another hull type could in theory keep me in/out of a spot 45 minutes longer on a slower rising/falling tide..but sacrificing a little better ride across the bay by not having a V.

Had a BT mosquito, sold it, moved west, and am now looking at being in Charleston by this fall.

With the large tidal swings (6ft+?) in that area...is it safe to assume on a rising/falling tide, that say 2" less draft may not be as much as a factor?

That point brought to my attention by a local SC Mav dealer. He recommend an HPX-V over the S for the better ride crossing the bay, as he claims the draft savings (at best 2") is negligible with the faster rising/falling tides in the are. Same could be said I guess for any flat bottom vs a V.....(not to start a brand debate, just hull type)

Does that theory hold water? How crucial is an extra inch or two of draft in those areas? I, well, my wife, would like the better ride of a V in chop, but I don't want to sacrifice the ability to fish shallow, as I'm most happy chasing tailing reds.

Any inputs on those tidal swings, is it as much of a factor as he says? Anyone with a v-hull ever feel limited in the creeks/grass flats?
 

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I will never buy another tunnel hull, the ride of a v hull is so much better. A friend of mine has owned Hell’s Bay, and several other brands and he just bought the HPX-v and said it is the best boat he has ever owned.
 

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I have an Xpress 185 Skiff (larger than most of your boats) but has a modified V all the way back. This thing handles rough water like a dream (for an aluminum boat) and can get skinny. I have a buddy who runs a 16' Sea Ark with a tunnel and I DREAM of running some areas he can... however, i can still get to most of the same areas, just much slower. But when it comes time to make a run in deeper water... mine all day.

Here's my thing, know your coastline and know where you can get at certain tides. If you can't get to A, get over to B.
 

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I have a feeling your Maverick dealer is trying to sell you the more expensive boat...I'm assuming an hpx-v is more expensive than an hpx-s? Either will do perfectly fine here in Charleston and I know numerous people who run either. It just depends on where in the Charleston area you see yourself fishing the most and what kind of water you'll crossing.

Something else to consider is the tide comes in fast and goes out fast here so if you'll be fishing skinny creeks or a mud flat at low tide it'll be easier to slide an hpx-s over a sandbar or the mud if you happen to stay too long. If flood tides are your thing, a 2" difference in draft could get you on the flat 15-20 minutes faster....
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I would hope a dealer would give an honest rec, and not base it on price...but you bring up a good point.

Unsure of the fishing around there...but based on where we're looking at homes/schools (Mt P). I'd say the Wando river and its creeks would be the closest/most frequented area to fish...I do enjoy exploring though and am not against running a ways if it gets me away from the crowds.
 

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I have a feeling your Maverick dealer is trying to sell you the more expensive boat...I'm assuming an hpx-v is more expensive than an hpx-s? Either will do perfectly fine here in Charleston and I know numerous people who run either. It just depends on where in the Charleston area you see yourself fishing the most and what kind of water you'll crossing.
Price difference is the same between the HPX-S and the HPX-V.
 

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I live in Ga 7-9ft tide swings, and I would pick a couple inches in draft over a slightly better ride, but that is only because I prefer to fish those shallow oyster strewn creeks that no matter how shallow you can get you are always in danger of getting some new oyster rash. Also, there is really nothing better than being the first up on the flood tide flats since there is nothing worse than showing up at your creek or flat only to see a smaller boat already working the spot you wanted to fish. I would not worry about running depth though, tunnels and jack plates are not really necessary with our creek river system and mud bottom. If you touch bottom while on plane 9 times out of 10 you are only touching mud and it's a non issue unless you are trying to blaze down a shallow creek at low tide.
 

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I'm guessing the dealer's advice to get the hull with more deadrise is because the harbor can get pretty choppy. Lots of people come here and think they want a shallow boat, but then realize they need a mouthguard and foul weather gear just to cross from the Wando to the Ashley. Sometimes you'll find times when the wind and tide is right and you'll end up with big rollers in the middle of the river as well. What you want as a fly guy is different than 95% of their customers. That being said, you don't need a 5" draft for most of the redfish around here anyway. We don't have miles of flats like in the Gulf. My Hewes drafts significantly more than even the HPX-V, and I really don't feel limited all that often. Shallow draft is really nice, but it can really make your skiff less versatile, especially if you have a wife or kids that aren't as hardcore as you might be. Personally, if I could only have one boat in Charleston, I'd want it to have a little bit of deadrise.

I think the tide swing doesn't affect the draft you'll need, really. It's just like any other area, although a few inches shallower will get you onto a flat 30 min earlier rather than an hour earlier. If anything, I would think larger tide swings would make you want a shallower boat. The tide drops more quickly, so it's easier to get stuck. I've stopped the boat to let the guy on the bow work a school of fish before, and gotten stuck since I stayed in one spot too long.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Seems like the consensus is to lean towards the better ride of the V, as you're not sacrificing a whole lot of fishability and can still fish the creeks/grass successfully with a 8-10" draft?

I know the wife would appreciate the better ride for trips to the island (she doesnt fish). But we do take the dogs out to play.
 

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Mostly Harmless
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I moved from the Gulf coast to the east coast. A super skinny hull does not help as much over here because the transitions happen so fast. You can often only get into very shallow areas at peak tide +/- an hour. Sacrificing a niche-y skiff for a more utilitarian hull would probably be wise...

...but those reds in the grass on the full moon tides might be worth putting up with a microskiff.

Nate
 

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Seems like the consensus is to lean towards the better ride of the V, as you're not sacrificing a whole lot of fishability and can still fish the creeks/grass successfully with a 8-10" draft?

I know the wife would appreciate the better ride for trips to the island (she doesnt fish). But we do take the dogs out to play.
I'm fishing in NC with about 4ft of tidal swing. My boat under full load drafts about 7" down the center line and 4" along the edges. It's as much draft as I would consider having in a poling skiff, but it is a good trade off for the dry smooth ride. There is no way I would consider owning a skiff with 8-10" of draft for fishing the flooded grass or creeks and flats. Most of the places in the southeast have 6" oysters, so you have about 6" of clearance poling over them in 12" of water. Most of our creek mouths hold 2 or 3" of water at dead low tide due to sediment settlement.
 

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Hi John, Thanks for participating in the conversation. Assuming you are the same John Mauser from McFly out of Swansboro then you are running a East Cape Fury (nice boat) and you have a trolling motor and a poling platform. Based on your feedback re: not running a boat with an 8-10" draft, I have two questions 1. How frequently are you fishing in places where a draft of 8" plus would be problematic ? 2. In terms of time used what is your ratio of fishing with trolling motor vs poling? BTW great blog on your web page
 

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If I’m going super skinny, usually take kayak w/ bay boat. Pucker factor too great wondering if I can make it outta a cut in time. Cant even enjoy the extra 30 mins of fishing. Nc / sc line area 6+’. Y’all grab a seafood dinner in Calabash !
 

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Seems like the consensus is to lean towards the better ride of the V, as you're not sacrificing a whole lot of fishability and can still fish the creeks/grass successfully with a 8-10" draft?

I know the wife would appreciate the better ride for trips to the island (she doesnt fish). But we do take the dogs out to play.
yes, also this may be alarming to some but if it gets that shallow on flood tides where the boat can’t get in, you can wade fish.
 

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Hi John, Thanks for participating in the conversation. Assuming you are the same John Mauser from McFly out of Swansboro then you are running a East Cape Fury (nice boat) and you have a trolling motor and a poling platform. Based on your feedback re: not running a boat with an 8-10" draft, I have two questions 1. How frequently are you fishing in places where a draft of 8" plus would be problematic ? 2. In terms of time used what is your ratio of fishing with trolling motor vs poling? BTW great blog on your web page
John runs Tailing Tide Guide Service and is the owner/creator of Mauser Fly Fishing although he and McFly are seemingly joined at the hip......he's like most eastern NC fly guides in that he fishes a variety of waters based on time of year....if he's in the barrier island marshes he has to mind the tides and unless it's a flood tide he's going to find a bunch of water that can't be accessed with an 8" draft...........the picture I posted on this thread is a good example of what he is likely to be faced with.......
 

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John runs Tailing Tide Guide Service and is the owner/creator of Mauser Fly Fishing although he and McFly are seemingly joined at the hip......he's like most eastern NC fly guides in that he fishes a variety of waters based on time of year....if he's in the barrier island marshes he has to mind the tides and unless it's a flood tide he's going to find a bunch of water that can't be accessed with an 8" draft...........the picture I posted on this thread is a good example of what he is likely to be faced with.......
Thanks Sandy, and I got a kick out of the attached at the hip comment. True I guess...lol.

BoDawg,
Perry McDougald is McFly.

To answer your questions:

1) For redfish, I would guess I am fishing 80% of the time in areas I could not access with an 8" draft. That does not mean you can't access other areas for redfish (people sightcast them from ranger bayboats), but like Sandy said, I am choosing to access those areas under 8" because few other anglers can. ie, less pressure.

2) For redfish, I use the pole 99% of the time. But I fish other species such as speckled trout, striped bass, etc so overall the boat sees 80% pole/20% troll.

And thank you for the kind words about the blog!
 

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Run shallow, get stuck, catch fish while waiting for the tide to return.
Side note these pictures are years apart from 2 different locations miles apart........ICM

20150614_114243.jpg

GOPR2368.JPG
 
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