homebrew

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by james_bingham3, May 7, 2010.

  1. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    just curiuos has any one ever made any homebrew beer, thinking bout trying it
     
  2. iMacattack

    iMacattack busy, too busy

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    my brother in-law does and is part of homebrew club up in Atlanta. He and one of the other homebrewers have had a couple of their recipes distributed by a brewing company out of Stuart. They made a wicked crazy smooth brew they nicknames "crazy Ivan" that like 18% alcohol.

    I want to do it myself but have not tried to make a brew yet.
     

  3. noeettica

    noeettica Well-Known Member

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    You get "Better Beer" at a Much higher cost ;-)
     
  4. iMacattack

    iMacattack busy, too busy

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    two things to never buy cheep, beer and prophylactics... doing so will inevitably end in disaster.
     
  5. MATT

    MATT Well-Known Member

    My kinfolk have been home brewing for years but no beer...........
     
  6. DuckNut

    DuckNut Brandon, FL

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    I got kicked out of the dorm and almost college for having a still in my room.

    Several years later I tried it at a brew-pub in Chicago. Although it was a lot of fun my beer tasted like Schlitz!!!

    Now I find it is far less work to go to the store.
     
  7. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    bought the supplies hopefully i get the better part, price wise ingreidents cost bout 40 will make 5 gallons , the recipe is for a bluemoon type beer , blue moon at circle k is 16 dollars a 12 pack
    im a decent cook so hopefully it works
     
  8. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    thats a high alchol content sounds good, we have a brew guild here in pinellas county , gonna get in contact withem hopefully they have some pointers
     
  9. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Well I made my beer.it was supposed to be a bluemoon clone. It came out a little bitter and alot more hoppier. I liked it , :)wife doesn't ;D means more for me next batch will be a newcastle clone :)
     
  10. FSUfisher

    FSUfisher Well-Known Member

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    Makes me want to go out and start! How's the price comparison to store-bought? Have you done the calculations?
     
  11. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    compared to bud budlight not much difference compared to craft beer quite abit of differance
    My ingreidents for the new castle clone ran 20-25$ makes 5.5 gallons or about 60 12oz bottles :)
     
  12. IanCannon

    IanCannon I Love microskiff.com!

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    Myself and a few friends have been doing it for about a year now, always with extract, though we will soon adventure into the all grain brewing.  We have made 12-15 different batches now, of varying styles, some have turned out great, others....well one kinda tasted like band-aids smell, so we dumped that batch. So I would say we have a 95% success rate.  We started off with the True Brew kit and for the most part it has been great and still use everything up until the last batch without any problems.

    Some advice. 

    Doing it alone is a bitch, mainly when it comes to bottling the brew.  Also, having friends helps with the cost and makes it more entertaining for switching out who is the 'brew master.' 

    Sanitation.  Can not be said enough.  We have a large storage tub that we mix water and bleach and let everything (yes everything) soak for at least 30 minutes.

    Prime the yeast.  You will be keeping the yeast in the fridge up until 24 hour before you brew.  We have found that a sanitized 2 liter bottle of water with 3 big tablespoons of extract 24 hours before you boil the mash has been a great step in making our brew and it isn't something we have read much about.

    Boil the mash separate from the rest of the wort.  Trying to strain out the crushed grains, yeast, and hops into the carboy is a pain in the ass.  It is one less thing to have to deal with. 

    Turkey Fryer.  We got ours on sale at Bass Pro, and it has been the best $50 spent on the entire hobby thus far.  Boiling the wort stinks and if you don't want to make your lady friend and/or family mad at you and your new hobby, I would suggest doing it on the porch or garage. 

    Know your hops.  This is best done by taking a beer you already know and seeing what hops they use.  For myself and my friends we mainly stick to the IPAs so we looked at our favorites brands a seen what they use in terms of hops and added it to our recipe.  Also, it is very important on timing when it comes to adding the hops to the wort, the longer they are in the boil, the more alpha acids are released and the bitterer the beer become.  If you add them to the end of the boil, the more floral the beer is.  Then there is dry hoping...save that for later.

    Austin Home Brew.  We were trying to be the best Americas we could be and buy local and support local, the problem was the customer service of a certain unnamed home brew store made us venture off to the land of the internets.  I have to say that the packaging and quality of austinhomebrew.com is amazing and we wish we used them sooner.

    After the boil is all about temperature, we have been talking about a freezer with modified thermostat for some time now, but it is question of space that is holding us back.  We have found that keeping the carboy in a cool, dark place with a wet towel keeps the flavors consistent, as long as you keep the towel wet.

    The siphon, the evil siphon.  We have had majority of our problems with this, so to save some frustration, I will share what we have found out what works.  This is one of the most important steps, for you have to prevent contamination and do your best to not aerate the beer as it goes from the carboy to the bucket for the bottling.  Got to your favorite hardware store and buy 8' of clear flex tubing.  The inside diameter should be about the size of the tip of your pointer finger. We have found out that if there is any jointed sections, the tubing will wear out after a few uses and create a vacuum leak which will screw with the flow of the siphon.  Place the carboy on a very elevated surface (ours is on a high table with a storage bin under the carboy making the mouth of the carboy about 6' from the ground) Fill the tube with 3/4 of water and Person-A sticks the water free side in the carboy just below the surface of the brew and Person-B will hold the side with the water in a cup with the cup hovering in the bucket with a sanitized thumb stopping the flow.  What you are trying to do is let the water start the siphon without getting water in the bucket.  Once you release your thumb, all you need to do is get the brew over the hump, once that happens Person-A will lower the tube to just over the sediment, trying to prevent any sediment getting sucked up, while Person-B will place the tube on the bottom and side of the bucket smoothing out the flow.

    For bottling, we have found that three people makes it easy.  One person handing the bottles to the person on the floor, who has the wand that fills the bottle who passes it up to the person on the table who caps and labels.


    Save your bottles and save some money.  Now this isn't going to replace your normal beer drinking habit, it is a hobby.  We normally only get 46-50 bottles of home brew every 3 weeks, 5 weeks if you dry hop. I still go to the store and buy my favorite IPAs but now I save the bottles.  Long Hammer is not only delicious but their bottle are the best to recap.  Dos Equios bottles are impossible to recap with machine we use because it uses the lip on the neck to grab the bottle.

    The most we have paid for a batch is $50, and to get what we get out of it I say it is worth it and everybody involved enjoys doing it.

    More information at http://www.howtobrew.com
     
  13. IanCannon

    IanCannon I Love microskiff.com!

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    Pictures!!!!  This is from a couple months ago, covering some of the bottling process.

    [​IMG]
    On the left, Cascade Rush.  A 5 timed hopped Pale Ale, 4 on the boil once dry hoped.  On the right, Orange Cat ale.  An American Ale with orange tea.  Very fragrant and smooth. The dry hoping takes some extra time and this is the only time we bottled two brews at once.

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    Sanitation.  This is water and a small part of bleach.  Everything has seen the sanitation bucket, including our hands. 

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    Bleach doesn't go well with beer.  Rinse well...

    [​IMG]
    ...and dry.

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    The sediment.  Sorry for the blur, this is all cell phone pics.

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    Height.  Now we brew at my house and the carboy sits a little bit higher than the counter-top microwave combo for the siphon.

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    Person-A left and Person-B right.

    That's all I have... I hope it helps.
     
  14. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Welcome to the forum IanO,
    I've now brewed three batches an extract and two all grain batches
    the all grains were BIAB (brew in a bag ) check out BIABrewer.com great people
    I had an old freezer so i had to buy a keg system :D
    one of the all grain batches was an oatmeal stout cost me 23$ put it in the fermenter today :)
    Thanks for all the info , Austin brewers is a good site haven't bought anything yet but, I have a great local homebrew shop :)
    Are those plastic carboys ?
    thanks for all the good pics nd info
    Jimmy
     
  15. james_bingham3

    james_bingham3 I Love microskiff.com!

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    IanO forgot to ask do ya have a skiff and once again welcome to the site there are a bunch of great guys here with a vast amount of info :)
     
  16. ciscoglcsxmm

    ciscoglcsxmm I Love microskiff.com!

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