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I Love Skinny Water
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I was watching the Pursuit channel and they had 2 shows on these little boats. The shows where both tournaments, one in LA and one in Sweden. These fishermen had more stuff on those little boats than I have on my boat their pretty cool but you better keep them in creeks or flats cause a big boat going by would sink it. I haven't a clue what they cost. Probably about the same as a 14' skiff
 

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A Hobie Mirage goes for 3000 - 3500 dollars so yeah you could find a small late model skiff for that but you won't be able to car top it. People get kayaks for different reasons. You can get a reasonable fishing yak for considerably less than 1000 dollars and you don't need a trailer an outboard or a towing vehicle. All in all they are a cheap effective way to get on the water and fish. That said they are a lot of work if you have to cover distances on the water.
 

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Fished Hobie kayaks for years. Fished the flats and the gulf. I would do trips into the gulf out to 5 miles. I even fished IFA kayak tournaments. They are sit on to kayaks. If they flip over you just right them and climb back aboard. You can’t sink them unless you leave a hatch open or have a hole in them. Even then they have flotation foam.
It doesn’t take the level of fitness in the petal kayaks that it does in a paddle kayak. I would leave at safe light and fish all day. I could stand up and fish and usually fished about 10 mile legs each way. I’m not young or in great physical condition. I liked the fact that I could get very close to the fish before being spotted.
 

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Been fishing out of a cheap two-man Lifetime kayak (bought on sale at Sports Authority years ago for $300) while 4 months into a 6 week rebuild of my Gheenoe, and it's been a blast. Sight fished a 26.5" red in 12" of water that towed me around the little lagoon I was in - while standing up. Even when I (eventually) get my Gheenoe done, and eventually get another skiff, I'll keep the yak for the quick shallow trips.
 

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Here are my thoughts on kayak fishing, having owned everything from a $300 wally world special, to a $500 perception (both sit-in), to the $2300 Hobie Outback (12' with pedals).

Pros: quiet, peaceful, gives you some exercise, almost a more primitive way to fish, can get stupid skinny (but only with the pedals out), cool way to get into tournament fishing if you don't have a $$ tournament rig, can be a low cost way to get on the water. You don't have to pay for gas or maintenance and most people have a way to store it. You can obviously catch some dandy fish off of the things and be very quiet as a one-man operation.

Cons: You're always fishing by yourself, unless you go out in a little plastic flotilla, which can get annoying. It's actually less convenient than fishing out of a power boat, in my opinion, especially if you're car topping. For example; in my skiff, I back down the ramp, launch, park, and go. With a kayak, you unload the boat, pedals, seat, rods, crate or tackle bag/box, paddle, stick anchor or other (maybe both), fish ruler, cooler, etc. Then you drag or roll down the ramp, watching for boaters. If you car top, you're trying to control at least 80lbs up and down off your roof rack. Pickup beds are easier, and you can keep a lot more gear on the kayak during transport.

Pedal kayaks have way too much stuff for fly line to get caught on, so if that's how you fish, you'd have to use a basket or something.

There's no really good way to troll an area while standing, although while seated you can fish an area and keep moving at a perfect trolling speed. You're committed to fishing a relatively smaller area, closer to where you launch than with a skiff.

Lastly, you can't bring a girl on your fishing kayak.

PS. If you peddle a kayak you're selling it. :D
 

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Here are my thoughts on kayak fishing, having owned everything from a $300 wally world special, to a $500 perception (both sit-in), to the $2300 Hobie Outback (12' with pedals).

Pros: quiet, peaceful, gives you some exercise, almost a more primitive way to fish, can get stupid skinny (but only with the pedals out), cool way to get into tournament fishing if you don't have a $$ tournament rig, can be a low cost way to get on the water. You don't have to pay for gas or maintenance and most people have a way to store it. You can obviously catch some dandy fish off of the things and be very quiet as a one-man operation.

Cons: You're always fishing by yourself, unless you go out in a little plastic flotilla, which can get annoying. It's actually less convenient than fishing out of a power boat, in my opinion, especially if you're car topping. For example; in my skiff, I back down the ramp, launch, park, and go. With a kayak, you unload the boat, pedals, seat, rods, crate or tackle bag/box, paddle, stick anchor or other (maybe both), fish ruler, cooler, etc. Then you drag or roll down the ramp, watching for boaters. If you car top, you're trying to control at least 80lbs up and down off your roof rack. Pickup beds are easier, and you can keep a lot more gear on the kayak during transport.

Pedal kayaks have way too much stuff for fly line to get caught on, so if that's how you fish, you'd have to use a basket or something.

There's no really good way to troll an area while standing, although while seated you can fish an area and keep moving at a perfect trolling speed. You're committed to fishing a relatively smaller area, closer to where you launch than with a skiff.

Lastly, you can't bring a girl on your fishing kayak.

PS. If you peddle a kayak you're selling it. :D
Thanks for the grammar lesson. I stand corrected.
 
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