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Oh and nobody is saying you use all your resources. Don’t be stupid but if you can afford it! Get after it.
Yes, but the very first post of this thread the guy is asking how to buy a Hells Bay he can't afford haha, but I get what you are saying.
 

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Hull weight at 325 for full carbon build, lack of bow wave while poling, that I saw demonstrated by poling up to within 6" of redfish slowly cruising extreme shallows, and those are skittish nervous reds too because over there in the marsh by Cedar Bayou, airboats run over them just about every day. A boat that is properly rigged for a tunnel, my Professional was not rigged properly for the tunnel at all. I had to get assistance to pull the motor off the jackplate and install another piece of 1/2" aluminum to facilitate mounting the motor at least 3" higher so the bullet would be in the proximity of the tunnel, etc. Rear-facing rod tubes, rounded decks for water drainage, some of the things that come to mind. The weight thing is a really big deal.

So a Hells Bay is a well-built boat (albeit porky) and tends to hold value fairly well. The older whips etc were substantially lighter. Since I intend this boat to be the last I ever buy, decided to get the one I really wanted. Took a trip out of Goose Island with Stephen Ford, prolly shouldn't have done that, but when I poled that boat in water it barely floated in, and had to re-learn the pole compared to the Professional, that got my attention. Seeing Stephen jump that boat up sitting on mud and it's not even a tunnel also got my attention. The attention to fit and finish is extreme. The boat feels like a tuned instrument. Does any of this really matter to anyone else? Maybe so maybe no. And not dissing anyone's boat. Could be a Sabine, could be a Maverick, East Cape, I don't care what anyone else runs, (all good boats), I have to pay for my own and earning it with hard work and also my trading. Hope to pay her off if the mkt drops hard and fast again. Which I think it will some day. Been working 7-12s for couple months, and paid cash for my micro truck to tow it with. Priorities man. What do you want and how do you want to do it?

Could I have been happy with another HB? Honestly prolly so. Pricing is not really that different, it boils down to the weight and design mostly. Heck if I couldn't do anything else other than a kayak, I would find a way to get on the water in pursuit of fish on the fly. Was it smart to commit to such an expensive boat? Arguably no. But these are not normal times. I think there is going to be mass chaos and a full collapse of the monetary system so decided to just go for it, knowing that someday the boat could go away but at least I had the time to get serious about chasing on the fly. Good enough.
 

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Costs you 100k :D
Actually no. Right at 80k. But I purposely did not add power poles, trolling motor, and all other stuff that adds weight and cost. Now go for that SWEET 21 and yeah you're looking at around 125k if full carbon etc. Plus it was an added 3500 for the tunnel I just had to have. So if I got the boat with no tunnel, and half-carbon build, would have been identical to HB Pro maybe a little less since I ordered a galvanized steel gator-skin coated trailer. But I did order the full carbon build, and the tunnel. So I get to pay up sucka!
 

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I know it is silly but I need some more time on the Chittum to see how the Carbon builds hold up. Really like the Chittums though.
 

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Discussion Starter #110
We aren’t certain he can’t afford it, he may just be new to this but your right, if you are worried about cost you might want to pass on a trip to HB shop. ;)
I am looking for my first boat and hb is near the house. I had heard ankona/salt Marsh has entry level for less than $20k. I'm starting to understand why hb is $10k more for their base. Sticker shock.
 

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First skiff I would not buy a top shelf boat. Find out what works for you then look into a custom builder.
agree with this. you may discover you're not that enthused about this type of fishing or you may end up only fishing a few times a year in which case you'd be much better off going on guided trips. if I were you I'd get a low hour used ankona or something similar. don't get a crap fake "flats boat" like I did for my 1st "flats" boat. cape craft pc of junk. god I was such a newb .
 

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I know it is silly but I need some more time on the Chittum to see how the Carbon holds up.
Here’s my completely unbiased opinion on the carbon. It will hold up perfectly fine barring any accidents like hitting a rock, stump, etc... in which case it will not be happy! It’s a great material for 95% of folks. I’ll be doing X-2.0 in full carbon one off fashion and it will be stupid light but not as resilient as a fiberglass hull.
 
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You're also going to make a lot of beginner errors with your first boat. It's a miracle I didn't sink my first boat. Running it hard aground, running it into docks, towing it with the motor trimmed down and the JP all the way down and dragging the skeg pulling into parking lots. Cutting a corner too tight and tearing a fender off the trailer on a steel pillar guarding a gas pump....All those things are a lot easier to stomach (and fix) on a $10K boat than a $60K Hell's Bay or similar.
 

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Not to be a dick here... I’m genuinely curious: what does a Chittum do that an HB doesn’t?
It’s not so much that it does things the HB can’t. It’s that it does many things better.
 

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Here’s my completely unbiased opinion on the carbon. It will hold up perfectly fine barring any accidents like hitting a rock, stump, etc... in which case it will not be happy! It’s a great material for 95% of folks. I’ll be doing X-2.0 in full carbon one off fashion and it will be stupid light but not as resilient as a fiberglass hull.
So oyster riddled area boat it is not? Why is the basalt not being used a bit more often?
 

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So oyster riddled area boat it is not? Why is the basalt not being used a bit more often?
I’m not really talking about oyster rash. But rather, high speed impacts. With fiberglass and basalt, the damage will stay more centralized to the impact zone where as carbon fiber the damage will spread farther.


I’m not 100% sold on basalt myself yet.
 

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Hull weight at 325 for full carbon build, lack of bow wave while poling, that I saw demonstrated by poling up to within 6" of redfish slowly cruising extreme shallows, and those are skittish nervous reds too because over there in the marsh by Cedar Bayou, airboats run over them just about every day. A boat that is properly rigged for a tunnel, my Professional was not rigged properly for the tunnel at all. I had to get assistance to pull the motor off the jackplate and install another piece of 1/2" aluminum to facilitate mounting the motor at least 3" higher so the bullet would be in the proximity of the tunnel, etc. Rear-facing rod tubes, rounded decks for water drainage, some of the things that come to mind. The weight thing is a really big deal.

So a Hells Bay is a well-built boat (albeit porky) and tends to hold value fairly well. The older whips etc were substantially lighter. Since I intend this boat to be the last I ever buy, decided to get the one I really wanted. Took a trip out of Goose Island with Stephen Ford, prolly shouldn't have done that, but when I poled that boat in water it barely floated in, and had to re-learn the pole compared to the Professional, that got my attention. Seeing Stephen jump that boat up sitting on mud and it's not even a tunnel also got my attention. The attention to fit and finish is extreme. The boat feels like a tuned instrument. Does any of this really matter to anyone else? Maybe so maybe no. And not dissing anyone's boat. Could be a Sabine, could be a Maverick, East Cape, I don't care what anyone else runs, (all good boats), I have to pay for my own and earning it with hard work and also my trading. Hope to pay her off if the mkt drops hard and fast again. Which I think it will some day. Been working 7-12s for couple months, and paid cash for my micro truck to tow it with. Priorities man. What do you want and how do you want to do it?

Could I have been happy with another HB? Honestly prolly so. Pricing is not really that different, it boils down to the weight and design mostly. Heck if I couldn't do anything else other than a kayak, I would find a way to get on the water in pursuit of fish on the fly. Was it smart to commit to such an expensive boat? Arguably no. But these are not normal times. I think there is going to be mass chaos and a full collapse of the monetary system so decided to just go for it, knowing that someday the boat could go away but at least I had the time to get serious about chasing on the fly. Good enough.
I want more post from this guy . Talk about taking fly fishing seriously. My man , love it . I like this dude .
 

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I’m not really talking about oyster rash. But rather, high speed impacts. With fiberglass and basalt, the damage will stay more centralized to the impact zone where as carbon fiber the damage will spread farther.


I’m not 100% sold on basalt myself yet.
it seems if certain materials were used in strategic locations on the hull you might get best of many worlds, wish I had time to dive into a build. Would be fun. Dang jobs get in the way too much. Any free time is fishing time.

These things have been discussed here a ton. I think the partial carbon layup on the Chittum sounds plenty good.

I may just have to have one at some point. :) can’t help myself.
 
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