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Discussion Starter #1
So a friend gave me a Ramlin from underneath is HB. It is in really good shape except the rear crossmember is pretty rotted. If I get another member welded up and on, I don't even know if a galvanizer would touch it. I have a call into one now.

Option two is find some hot dipped c channel (not cheesy electro plated) and weld it up and put some cold galvanizing on the welds.

Thoughts?
 

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Lowcountry Degen
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I'd be leaning towards option two -- I imagine the cost of cutting/welding, disassembling, sandblasting, and re-galvanizing would be pretty close to that of a new trailer.
 
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Here is what I would do...
Get a piece of aluminum box tube cut and bent to fit and have mounting plates welded on the ends. Carefully remove the old crossmember and prep the trailer for paint. After a very thorough cleaning prep the trailer and coat with a high quality epoxy primer. Bolt in new also primed with epoxy x member, paint to your likeing. It will last for many more years!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Option 3 is I have a call into a buddy that I know at one time had some flame coating equipment and I know he did some of his personal trailers. I watched part of this process. It was flippin' awesome and looked dangerous as heck. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The bunk supports are toast also. Other than that, for a free trailer, I'm stoked. Needs a total rewire job and new lights.

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What everyone that I knew did years ago was to have an old steel trailer sandblasted then metallized (coated with zinc - might be called “flame coated”) after replacing any steel that was too far gone. This was an industrial process that produced close to new galvanized results. You first dis-assembled it down to individual parts - then had the stripping and coating done to each part....

Once it was done the coated steel had a gray and powdery surface. No one I knew ever bothered to paint over it. They just put the trailer back together and ran it...

By the way I’d never mix metal types on a trailer frame used in the salt. You’d have galvanic corrosion problems as a result.

Hope this helps...
 
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What everyone that I knew did years ago was to have an old steel trailer sandblasted then metallized (coated with zinc - might be called “flame coated”) after replacing any steel that was too far gone. This was an industrial process that produced close to new galvanized results. You first dis-assembled it down to individual parts - then had the stripping and coating done to each part....

Once it was done the coated steel had a gray and powdery surface. No one I knew ever bothered to paint over it. They just put the trailer back together and ran it...

By the way I’d never mix metal types on a trailer frame used in the salt. You’d have galvanic corrosion problems as a result.

Hope this helps...
Bob, while I whole heartedly agree with mixing metals is a bad thing... it is litterally done on every trailer made and no way to avoid it really. If you re-read my post you will notice I suggested using an epoxy primer on both the steel and the aluminum x member. My offering was a way he could make most if not all repairs himself and have a nice dependable trailer again.
 

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BBA Counselor
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I think your over thinking it. Regalvanizing the whole thing might cost more then a new trailer frame. I would scrub the frame well, weld in the new part, and coat it all with cold galvanizing compound.

Either that or I would strip the trailer and just have a new frame made. The frame, especially a galvanized one because they are losing popularity, can be had fairly cheap.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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FWIW I took my old ramlin from under my Lostmen to Bill Adkins at Adkins Sandblasting and coating in Jacksonville once I stripped it down. He sandblasted, ospho'd, primed and painted it for $350. I purchased new bunk carpeting, rollers and strung new led lights. All in maybe $500 to rehab it. That was 3yrs ago and new owner is still putting it to use.
 

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I know mixed metals isn’t preferred , but every trailer has it to some degree. I’ d bolt something in place. Ck national trailers for cross member. Re built a cox trailer few years ago, they had a lot of options. Good luck
 

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Does the rust go all the way out to the side rails? If not, there is another option. Cut the rear crossmember leaving the 4”-6” section that is welded to the side rails attached. Drill a couple 1/2” holes in either side and bolt the rear crossmember in. When it rusts out again, unbolt it and replace.
 

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Where are you located? Ramlin can fix that up pretty easy. I had them weld new bunk supports on. They put SS bolts on there. It causes some galvanic corrosion like Capt LeMay said. My buddy replaced the bolts with galvanized ones and he has less trouble with that area of the trailer. I used to just hit it with a wire brush and cold galvanize every couple years or so. I think a lot of times it looks much worse than it is with that trailer.
 

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Owens and sons trailer had used tar paper at the carbon steel axle/springs to aluminum frame. No issues since 1987 with trailer. On another galvanized trailer I modified, cut off fixed supports to bolt adjustable supports to, galvozinc coated 6 years ago no issues.....
 
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