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Fellow TX Microskiffers,

CCA Texas formally issues their notice of opposition to the Port of Corpus Christi’s proposed desalination plant to be located on Harbor Island. Everyone who has an interest in preserving the local waters and estuaries surrounding Aransas Pass, Port Aransas, Rockport, etc. should learn more about this project and the risks it poses. Voice your opposition if so inclined....the CCA notice contains a link to the TCEQ feedback page. You’ll need the TCEQ permit # which is also included in the CCA notice. I have pasted the notice below, which can also be found on their website under the “news” section.

Dear CCA Texas Member,

The Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County proposes to operate a desalination facility on Harbor Island near Port Aransas with an effluent discharge outfall 300ft from the shoreline into the Corpus Christi Channel at a rate not to exceed 95,600,000 gallons per day (see application details). The location of this discharge is within the Redfish Bay State Scientific Area, an environmentally sensitive ecosystem. Numerous aquatic species, including but not limited to: blue crabs, menhaden, flounder species, shrimp species, red drum, trout, croaker, sea turtles, pinfish, pigfish, gafftopsail catfish, tarpon, tripletail and ling, utilize this coastal pass to reach their preferred habitats and food sources during various life stages.

The combination of increased water temperature and brine effluent at the discharge outfall could create an area of low dissolved oxygen content and pose significant risk to all manners of aquatic life, particularly winter spawning aggregations of sheepshead.

CCA Texas opposes this discharge permit for reasons mentioned above and we encourage our membership to lend their voice in opposition. You can file your personal comments by clicking here. Be sure to reference Permit No. WQ0005253000. Thank you for your efforts to protect and conserve our marine resources.
 

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I've filled out the TCEQ form. I recommend everyone look at this closely. This area needs to be protected. Way too much in the way of native sea grass estuary, mangroves, etc in this area to add more industry. In case you all don't know what Harbor Island is......that's smack in the middle of Light House Lakes.......a terrible place for more industry.
Matt
 

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I've filled out the TCEQ form. I recommend everyone look at this closely. This area needs to be protected. Way too much in the way of native sea grass estuary, mangroves, etc in this area to add more industry. In case you all don't know what Harbor Island is......that's smack in the middle of Light House Lakes.......a terrible place for more industry.
Matt
I would say smack dab in the middle of LHL is an over exaggeration, Harbor Island is on the south side of the Aransas Channel not the north side where LHL is. And the discharge is on the ship channel side where I would venture to guess the majority of the discharge would flow out the jetties with the tide and dissipate. Not saying that it is right or wrong but let’s paint the whole picture not just one side of it.
 

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I would say smack dab in the middle of LHL is an over exaggeration, Harbor Island is on the south side of the Aransas Channel not the north side where LHL is. And the discharge is on the ship channel side where I would venture to guess the majority of the discharge would flow out the jetties with the tide and dissipate. Not saying that it is right or wrong but let’s paint the whole picture not just one side of it.
Naa, none of that water from the ship channel flows over the adjacent flats...
 

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Naa, none of that water from the ship channel flows over the adjacent flats...
I would assume so, but as nit picky as the TGLO is I would highly doubt they would allow something to go in if it was going to do drastic damage to the ecosystem, you never know a higher salinity could bring in other fish. I am all for preserving the bays but we all need to look at both sides of the issue as well.
 

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I would assume so, but as nit picky as the TGLO is I would highly doubt they would allow something to go in if it was going to do drastic damage to the ecosystem, you never know a higher salinity could bring in other fish. I am all for preserving the bays but we all need to look at both sides of the issue as well.
Bwahaha, we still have oyster boats raking huge reefs flat then allowing them to move to new areas to drag them flat as well and it’s legal. Without live oysters filtering our bay water the ecosystem will collapse. The good thing about the Lighthouse Lakes area is oyster boats can’t reach most of the reefs so they are protected.
Hyper saline water being introduced at that volume is not natural by any means. If it “brings in” other fish then the ones that are already there will most likely be negatively effected.
 

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Bwahaha, we still have oyster boats raking huge reefs flat then allowing them to move to new areas to drag them flat as well and it’s legal. Without live oysters filtering our bay water the ecosystem will collapse. The good thing about the Lighthouse Lakes area is oyster boats can’t reach most of the reefs so they are protected.
Hyper saline water being introduced at that volume is not natural by any means. If it “brings in” other fish then the ones that are already there will most likely be negatively effected.
Very true about the oyster boats, they sure can destroy an area I live in the Sabine Lake area now and there are hardly any oysters due to over harvesting a long time ago from what I have read we have the muddiest water I have ever seen.
 

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Very true about the oyster boats, they sure can destroy an area I live in the Sabine Lake area now and there are hardly any oysters due to over harvesting a long time ago from what I have read we have the muddiest water I have ever seen.
A bay without oysters is like running your vehicle or air conditioner without a filter.
 

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"And the discharge is on the ship channel side where I would venture to guess the majority of the discharge would flow out the jetties with the tide and dissipate."

Hmmmmm............ they're only going to discharge on outgoing tides? May we quote you on that?
 

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"And the discharge is on the ship channel side where I would venture to guess the majority of the discharge would flow out the jetties with the tide and dissipate."

Hmmmmm............ they're only going to discharge on outgoing tides? May we quote you on that?
ok........
 

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Guys... the whole picture is, trout, redfish, flounder, and tarpon fry must pass thru the jetties. This super saline discharge will definitely change the water. Also, the intake will also have an effect.
The more we look at the whole picture the worse it gets.
 

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Guys... the whole picture is, trout, redfish, flounder, and tarpon fry must pass thru the jetties. This super saline discharge will definitely change the water. Also, the intake will also have an effect.
The more we look at the whole picture the worse it gets.
Redfish, flounder, and sheepshead fry migrate into our bay estuaries to grow to sexual maturity and complete the cycle. Salinity at natural and manmade shipping jetties varies with every large rainfall or drought event and the migration continues to the slowly eroding and compromised estuaries. Compared to the waterfront development, long term effects of dams, and exponential effects of rising sea level, the small desalinization plant is insignificant to sustaining local fin fish populations. And of course we all know that red drum fry thrive in the beautiful, hyper saline, sea grasses of the Laguna Madre south of Corpus Christi. So fly junkie, let's hope you do not live on what was once an estuary margin in Port Aransas and if you do, you do everything possible to offset the impact.
 

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They said they preliminarily determined that it would not cause environmental damage to the water, more or less. Preliminarily? Does preliminarily mean after plant 1-2-3-4? Feelz like Florida in..
 
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I would say smack dab in the middle of LHL is an over exaggeration, Harbor Island is on the south side of the Aransas Channel not the north side where LHL is. And the discharge is on the ship channel side where I would venture to guess the majority of the discharge would flow out the jetties with the tide and dissipate. Not saying that it is right or wrong but let’s paint the whole picture not just one side of it.
Not really much of an exaggeration when you talk about 95,600,000 gallons of waste water discharge per DAY! Yes, they want to discharge into the CC ship channel but with an incoming tide, that will end up in LHL, Brown and Root, etc on the same day. There is a reason the marine scientists down that way stated they would approve of the facility, IF if was offshore. Oysters, as well as all the other larval forms of fish, crustaceans, etc have narrow salinity ranges.
Best,
Matt
 
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Redfish, flounder, and sheepshead fry migrate into our bay estuaries to grow to sexual maturity and complete the cycle. Salinity at natural and manmade shipping jetties varies with every large rainfall or drought event and the migration continues to the slowly eroding and compromised estuaries. Compared to the waterfront development, long term effects of dams, and exponential effects of rising sea level, the small desalinization plant is insignificant to sustaining local fin fish populations. And of course we all know that red drum fry thrive in the beautiful, hyper saline, sea grasses of the Laguna Madre south of Corpus Christi. So fly junkie, let's hope you do not live on what was once an estuary margin in Port Aransas and if you do, you do everything possible to offset the impact.
I agree with you on the dangers of continued coastal development. However, there are few to no oysters in the hyper-saline middle and lower Laguna Madre. Not sure if the salinity flux around the desalination facility would cause problems with the large number of oyster reefs, but I also don't think anyone else really knows either. You are right in that one plant seems small but if you do the math on 95,600,00 gallons of effluent waste water per day x 365 days/year, that could matter over time. Oysters are over-fished on the upper coast and contributes to lack of decent water clarity. If we lose some of them in AP, water clarity could surely suffer.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Public comment forum in AP on February 28 @7pm. After reading the TCEQ letter, it feels like a bit of a formality, but will be interesting to hear some of the discussion. Just wish they could pipe the discharge offshore also vs puking it onto our flats and estuaries.
 
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