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Just livin’ my life easy come easy go...
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Not many trees to hug down here man. Go ahead and say what you think without the qualifications. It is where we live and not politics. Those folks that “hug trees” will be your best friends on this one.
 
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Not many trees to hug down here man. Go ahead and say what you think without the qualifications. It is where we live and not politics. Those folks that “hug trees” will be your best friends on this one.
I’m a staunch conservative, think liberalism is mental disorder and have 3 college degrees, all in biological sciences:) I hate big government, over regulation and believe firmly in the concept of laisssez-faire. This area is rich with turtle grass and important as a nursery. Definitely not a typical tree hugger but we need to protect TX flats.
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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I’m a staunch conservative, think liberalism is mental disorder and have 3 college degrees, all in biological sciences:) I hate big government, over regulation and believe firmly in the concept of laisssez-faire. This area is rich with turtle grass and important as a nursery. Definitely not a typical tree hugger but we need to protect TX flats.
Yep and oysters won’t survive that much fresh water. Things will go to hell in a hand basket if this slips by.
 

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Yep and oysters won’t survive that much fresh water. Things will go to hell in a hand basket if this slips by.
That's the big concern. Desal is not an efficient process, or it would already be in widespread use. They propose to produce about 10 million gallons/day, which is estimated to provide a whopping 10% of the city's daily needs. Of course, this is just info provided by the private company in FL that want's to try make this work here. I'd be interested to see what the environmental scientists have to say here as the big concern is that you have to process a lot of water to make desal work. The potential problem is taking all that water from the Redfish Bay State Scientific area and running it through the plant, along with hyper saline wastewater discharge. The game fish won't be immediately impacted. However, larval crustaceans (read all the crabs, shrimp, etc) as well as oyster system vital to the health of our bay, and our game fish, could suffer and suffer significantly. Again, we need a valid environmental impact statement generated by unbiased scientists (not ones paid by the FL Seven Seas company) to really know how this will affect us in the long-term. I'm all for responsible business enterprise if handled very carefully but too often, we move forward without sufficient data and regret it 10 yrs later. Some scientists have weighed in and recommended the plant simply be established offshore but this kills margin for profit so Seven Seas isn't having it. Business is business and no reason to do this if a) it won't supply enough water for Corpus anyway and b) if a privatized entity can't turn a profit. The City of Corpus has been looking at doing this themselves for years but likely can't overcome their own beuracratic hindrances to make it work. I'm by no means an enviromental extremist, but grew up in the marshes of the upper coast. Galveston used to have viable sea grass and much better water quality. Current efforts to restore Galveston Bay have yet to restore our water quality. There are certainly fish on the upper coast, in number, but many of us fish south to find the water we need for consistent sight fishing. Thus, I oppose the desal plant until a significant body of data shows us it's justifiable. Harbor Island has some perks for this project, mainly that of roads/other infrastructure and relative proximity the gulf for wastewater discharge but I'm not sure LHL/Redfish Bay State Scientific Areas can still flourish with a plant that will involve 33 acres of construction on Harbor Island. I'd love to see the numbers on how much rich bay water has to be sucked up and processed to produce 10 million gallons of fresh water in a day. I'm sure it's not a small amount.
Regards,
Matt
 

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No need to preface your position man. It’s pretty well documented that most sportsmen tend to lean conservative/libertarian but we’re also by far the most consistent stewards of the environment.

It’s not the same as tree-hugging from the enviro-wackos because most of us put our money where our mouths are by donating generously of our time and money to environmental conservation efforts.
 

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No need to preface your position man. It’s pretty well documented that most sportsmen tend to lean conservative/libertarian but we’re also by far the most consistent stewards of the environment.

It’s not the same as tree-hugging from the enviro-wackos because most of us put our money where our mouths are by donating generously of our time and money to environmental conservation efforts.
Agreed. Surffshr assumed incorrectly. Hence my clarification.
Best,
Matt
 
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The Coastal Bend Bays Foundation is planning a Coastal Issues Forum (CIF) with a desalination panel. If you haven't been to one of these forums, I recommend attending. They host a few each year focused on significant environmental and conservation topics pertinent to the Coastal Bend. The desal panel will probably be in March or April, but a date has not been set yet.

I will be there. Could be a cool opportunity to meet y'all. Maybe a trip to Lazy Beach Brewing after?
 

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The Coastal Bend Bays Foundation is planning a Coastal Issues Forum (CIF) with a desalination panel. If you haven't been to one of these forums, I recommend attending. They host a few each year focused on significant environmental and conservation topics pertinent to the Coastal Bend. The desal panel will probably be in March or April, but a date has not been set yet.

I will be there. Could be a cool opportunity to meet y'all. Maybe a trip to Lazy Beach Brewing after?
Keep us posted as to dates.
Cheers,
Matt
 

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The Coastal Bend Bays Foundation is planning a Coastal Issues Forum (CIF) with a desalination panel. If you haven't been to one of these forums, I recommend attending. They host a few each year focused on significant environmental and conservation topics pertinent to the Coastal Bend. The desal panel will probably be in March or April, but a date has not been set yet.

I will be there. Could be a cool opportunity to meet y'all. Maybe a trip to Lazy Beach Brewing after?
Keep me in the loop bro.
 

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Good you guys are taking notice, but understand all the facts on this desalinization project gentlemen. Desalinization vs dams(freshwater diversion) for environmental degradation I will take the salt. Energy costs/technology have kept desalinization out of the mainstream but now is the time to consider it for certain applications(now and in the future) and Corpus Christi growth/jobs is one of them. The plant can be designed in a manner that minimizes environmental impact. USA energy growth is the prime USA job producer the last ten years or so and has always been strong in Texas.

The best mitigation to reduce coastal environmental impact in Texas and all coastal zones is reduced development of waterfront coastal zones. But guess what, this requires big, bad government to make law or eliminate subsidies. One acre of coastal spartina marsh or shoal grass is more valuable than hundreds of houses on stilts with a view but very few people understand or care about how the development affects quality of human and marine life. Here are just a few examples: Red McCombs Goose Island St Charles Bay waterfront development complete with canals, Federal flood insurance subsidies, Federal agricultural subsidies, tighter water treatment standards. Just think, we are all subsidizing coastal development and degradation because of who we vote for, including parks and wildlife board appointments, judges, etc...........
 

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Another plus of big government is the State of Texas purchase of the 35,000 acre Powderhorn Ranch two years ago ensuring the protection of one half of the Powderhorn Lake estuary. If you have not been to Indianola, Texas, check out what the other side of Powderhorn Lake looks like.
 

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@sjrobin - I don’t believe it’s opposition to desalination plants per se but rather the location of this one and the proposed discharge site.

For example, Providenciales in Turks & Caicos relies heavily on desalination for water but their discharge pipe ends almost a mile out into the ocean, not into a sheltered, sensitive bay environment.
 

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Another plus of big government is the State of Texas purchase of the 35,000 acre Powderhorn Ranch two years ago ensuring the protection of one half of the Powderhorn Lake estuary. If you have not been to Indianola, Texas recently check out what the other side of Powderhorn Lake looks like.
We will see about how they “save” that area. I heard through the grapevine that the bay front is going to be turned into an RV park and adding a boat ramp. People need to stop already.
 

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Keep up the dialogue here. But we need to start doing something. The surprise for me is that so few people in Corpus are aware of the desalinization proposal. I was with a group of CC community leaders in early December. No one knew about the Harbor Island desal plant.
 

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As for Harbor Island, there is a plan to put a terminal to receive VLCCs very large crude carriers, the equivalent of vessels carrying 100-200,000 tons. This port will connect the West Texas oil fields by pipeline to export markets. I am not personally in favor of this plan... But it seems like manifest destiny for Texas and the US.

Putting a desalinization plant at the pass to our bays, though, is a terrible plan and should be stopped.
 

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The Panama Canal revisions were completed in 2016 specifically for VLCC and VLLNG vessels to get USA energy to Asian markets. Cheniere LNG facilities at Corpus Christi will liquefy natural gas primarily from West Texas pipelines. Ethane is a significant component of shale gas so this ethane by product stream will be used to feed the largest steam cracking furnaces on the planet also located at Corpus Christi/Gregory/Portland and designed/operated by ExxonMobil. Ethane is cracked to ethylene then polymerized to polyethylene for manufacturing of high quality plastic products. The scope and scale of the world's energy markets can not be overstated and these organizations are well prepared to deliver the energy in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Once again natural gas is the best energy choice at this time.
The XOM/Sabic project requires 18 mgd of water and the City of Corpus Christi confirmed availability of the water supply in 2017.
 

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Pleased to see this discussion taking shape. Finn summed it up...it’s not a blanket opposition to desal plants, rather a push to consider alternative locations, etc. This proposal is being guided by short-sighted economics and is unbalanced in its consideration of the greater public resource and and all the stakeholders that enjoy this precious area. The Port of CC has been less than transparent in this whole deal, and Stevie is spot on regarding the lack of awareness around this project. Many are confusing this project with the other Harbor Island planned projects (VLCC dockage, associated dredging, etc.). I get the Port’s sense of urgency to stay at the forefront of the energy export picture, but there has to be a call for greater transparency, sufficient public and environmental input, etc. I’m a pro-business guy too, fyi, but we need some major awareness raised on this deal.
 

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Perpetual growth model demands sacrifice till there is nothing left.

Cartoon Of the Year
December 29, 2018

I often use other people's political cartoons to make my own political statements and this one, by the late, Glenn Foden, is my favorite for 2018.

At year-end 2017 the EIA (AEO 2017) suggested America had 43 billion barrels of proven (1P) oil reserves. In a recent report by the EIA (STEO Decemeber 2018) ) it placed total daily crude + condensate production at 11.8MM BOPD. That means we have ten years of proven oil reserves remaining in the United States. Let me repeat that, please...10 years.

Any new oil reserves currently being added to United State's inventory will be light, tight unconventional reserves that are known to decline at the rate of 22-27% annually the first three years of production life, then 11-15% annually thereafter.

To replace declining LTO reserves the US shale oil industry needs a constant influx of capital to stay on the drilling hamster wheel. With oil prices of less than $55 per BO, 95% of the wells drilled in the future will be unprofitable, or marginally profitable, to produce. The public and private shale oil industry in America has drilled 70,000 wells the past 10 years and has approximately $280 billion of long term debt; $85 billion dollars of long term debt as already been walked (Haynes & Boone). In other words, the shale oil industry has not even paid for what it has already produced yet.

Recent studies by the EIA and the USGS regarding "technically" recoverable, as yet undiscovered light tight oil "resources" will require MUCH higher oil prices to even remotely be economical and have a less than 50% probability of ever being realized (SPE). As an American your oil future is now totally dependent on the shale oil industry's ability to keep borrowing money.

Exporting, or 'amputating' any [1] of America's light, tight unconventional oil supply, at $20 per BO discounts to Brent, while its associated gas is flared, is stupid energy policy [2] [3]. We do not have the oil resources left to do that.

Conservation is not a four letter word. We're leaving our kids with a damn mess to sort out down the road.

Mike Shellman
MCA Petroleum
 
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