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Fly Fishing Shaman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is further fallout from last year's disastrous red tide:

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will extend catch-and-release measures for snook, red drum and spotted seatrout for an additional year via an Executive Order. All three species will remain catch-and-release through May 31, 2021, in all waters from the Hernando/Pasco county line south through Gordon Pass in Collier County.
These temporary regulation changes were made to help conserve these popular inshore species that were negatively impacted by a prolonged red tide that occurred in late 2017 through early 2019.

Learn more about regulations for these species by visiting MyFWC.com/Marine and clicking on “Recreational Regulations.”

View the Commission meeting presentation at MyFWC.com/Commission by clicking on “Commission Meetings” and the agenda under “February 19-20, 2020.”

Here's the map of the C&R zone:

 

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Tampa Bay has not recovered I can tell you that. I catch & release anyway so no impact on me but the closure is obviously a sign of much larger issues in our estuary.
 

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Fly Fishing Shaman
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6,387 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Tampa Bay has not recovered I can tell you that. I catch & release anyway so no impact on me but the closure is obviously a sign of much larger issues in our estuary.
It's all relative. The bait also needs to also "fully" recover in order for all species to recover. What stinks is the east coast also got hit more than they had in years, yet there is no closure over there.
 

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I had a stone crabber tell me he was getting 60lbs of TT a day at the beginning of stone season...
He said for some reason it slowed down...
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I feel like making those three species catch and release only for recreational anglers is like putting a bandaid on a gaping artery wound. The real problem is over development and run-off. The amount of fish killed by recreational anglers in a year compared to fish killed in an environmental fish kill has to be a drop in the bucket. It is so frustrating to see the state being ruined by these issues, yet no solution to address the real problem because of the interbreeding amonst politics, real estate development and money. Preaching to the choir I know...
 
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I feel like making those three species catch and release only for recreational anglers is like putting a bandaid on a gaping artery wound. The real problem is over development and run-off. The amount of fish killed by recreational anglers in a year compared to fish killed in an environmental fish kill has to be a drop in the bucket. It is so frustrating to see the state being ruined by these issues, yet no solution to address the real problem because of the interbreeding amonst politics, real estate development and money. Preaching to the choir I know...
keep voting for people who deregulate, de-emphasize science, and are on the payroll of developers and sugar and nothing will happen.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Meat guides are hitting them really hard
"Meat guides" and commercial impacts deserve inclusion in this discussion as well...right along with people in coastal watersheds who pay to put chemicals on their lawns and people who take omega 3 fish oil pills which are generated from plundering the bait schools that feed the game fish and other predators.

Its a complex situation that goes well beyond mere politics.
 
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"Meat guides" and commercial impacts deserve inclusion in this discussion as well...right along with people in coastal watersheds who pay to put chemicals on their lawns and people who take omega 3 fish oil pills which are generated from plundering the bait schools that feed the game fish and other predators.

Its a complex situation that goes well beyond mere politics.
? I did include them.

Add to your list: golf courses, lawn care companies, car washes, cities who dump raw sewage, and aren’t held liable because of lax regulations and $$$$, home owners who plant high need lawns like at Augustine grass etc etc
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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don’t vote for someone because of their stance on abortion and guns
I ignored your comment on "de-emphasize science" and an urge to stray into other areas...so lets...

 

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I feel like making those three species catch and release only for recreational anglers is like putting a bandaid on a gaping artery wound. The real problem is over development and run-off. The amount of fish killed by recreational anglers in a year compared to fish killed in an environmental fish kill has to be a drop in the bucket. It is so frustrating to see the state being ruined by these issues, yet no solution to address the real problem because of the interbreeding amonst politics, real estate development and money. Preaching to the choir I know...
Agree. We are essentially flushing a turd in a toilet bow. Need to address the turd not the toilet bowl...

These fish also all have slot limits which preserve breeding and juvenille fish. The closure will only increase pressure on other fish as well such as TT mentioned above. You see it clear as day with the ARS closure. Now triggerfish/red eyes/sea bass are "sought after" fish.

The demands for C&R is not the solution and if anything it would provide a short term beneficial statistic for those that impact the environment negatively. You can ban deer hunting but if you kill the forest it is irrelevant..

Sustainable harvest is key which is why I favor slot limits and would rather see that on other species instead of all of these closures.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I am catch and release exclusive, but, this is a question if we are a free people or not. Recreational have almost no impact on any of this and if we want to curtail recreational "meat fisherman" we should do it through changing behavior with education. This problem was created by destruction of the water quality by industry and commercial overfishing.
 

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You see it clear as day with the ARS closure.
Yup...lots of people stopped making expensive offshore runs because of closures there. This resulted in increased pressure on inshore fisheries while also shifting offshore focus to mangrove snapper, hogfish, and etc.

The inshore and offshore fisheries are very different IMHO because noone runs offshore to play catch and release like many of us do inshore. Offshore fishing is largely meat fishing, with the exception of billfish or some pelagics treated like gamefish. But offshore fisheries are hugely expansive and largely inaccessible when compared to inshore fisheries in size and stock. Apples and oranges really.

[Off Topic]
The interesting thing I noticed when I was participating in the ARS debate was the close alignment between the enviro groups and the restaurant lobbies. It was pretty obvious that the goal of both was to cut recreational anglers out of the equation so that we have to buy our snapper, grouper, etc from a restaurant or meat counter. They use enviro dogma to promote this under the guise that commercial interests are more manageable and restricted...all while allowing huge numbers of significantly smaller fish to be kept...allwhile destroying structure (see the LA oil rigs) that would support and house thousands of fish...and all while selling IFQ access for public resources to private individuals...
[/Off Topic]

After a couple of years of going to Gulf Council events and ARS discussions in St Pete I finally stopped trying to coordinate offshore runs on the family boat, put it out of my mind, and started harassing redfish, snook, and tarpon in tiny skiffs pushed along by carbon poles...
 
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Yup...lots of people stopped making expensive offshore runs because of closures there. This resulted in increased pressure on inshore fisheries while also shifting offshore focus to mangrove snapper, hogfish, and etc.

The inshore and offshore fisheries are very different IMHO because noone runs offshore to play catch and release like many of us do inshore. Offshore fishing is largely meat fishing, with the exception of billfish or some pelagics treated like gamefish. But offshore fisheries are hugely expansive and largely inaccessible when compared to inshore fisheries in size and stock. Apples and oranges really.

[Off Topic]
The interesting thing I noticed when I was participating in the ARS debate was the close alignment between the enviro groups and the restaurant lobbies. It was pretty obvious that the goal of both was to cut recreational anglers out of the equation so that we have to buy our snapper, grouper, etc from a restaurant or meat counter. They use enviro dogma to promote this under the guise that commercial interests are more manageable and restricted...all while allowing huge numbers of significantly smaller fish to be kept...allwhile destroying structure (see the LA oil rigs) that would support and house thousands of fish...and all while selling IFQ access for public resources to private individuals...
[/Off Topic]

After a couple of years of going to Gulf Council events and ARS discussions in St Pete I finally stopped trying to coordinate offshore runs on the family boat, put it out of my mind, and started harassing redfish, snook, and tarpon in tiny skiffs pushed along by carbon poles...
That’s why it needs to be science based. The leaders of fisheries, other wildlife agencies, water (like SFWMD) need to be scientist. Not politicians, contributors to campaigns, developers lawyers etc
 

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The practice of catch and release most here, I imagine, support anyway and think as I do that it is a good idea. I don't have statistics available on how the rec angler impacts snook, red and specs although stats on stripe bass are available and it surprised me to learn the large impact rec fishing has on that population both in taking and killing after catch. But my real point is that where I fish in Florida I have so enjoyed the last year due to the reduced fishing boat traffic- most of which was crazy bay boats and tower boats screaming all over the place and so many ripping up the flats. There was/is still some traffic but it has been "almost" enjoyable. This indicates on a small sample that rec fishing does have an impact. Totally agree that red tide, algae, and other issues result in enormous damage and fish kills.
 
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