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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me if I’m overlooking my answer, but I’m new to the skiff world. I’ve searched and searched on people attaching grab bars with yeti cradle similar what’s on the Drake Outlaw. I messaged Richard and I received two replies he didn’t sell parts and he didn’t work on older models in hindsight. My concern is the floor flex in the boat (which I read is normal) what’s the best way/easiest way to mount a grab bar and yeti and will it hurt my hull since it’s designed to flex?
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The issue with drilling in tie downs on the karma is that the floors are too thin.
Yeah there’s not much meat there. Im assuming the boats that are designed with grab handles have false floors or stringers or something to support the weight. Im taking it to a glass shop Monday to discuss my options. False floor will be nice to hide wires for a fish finder on grab rail.
 

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Epoxy some blocks in to floor. I can remember the name of them but simeone on here will. @Whiskey Angler did that on his gladesman.
I embedded 3/8" phenolic blocks into my cored floor.
See here ...https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013HQ6ZM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used a zip bit on my dremel to cut out the top layer of glass (about 1/8" to 3/16" thick) from the cored floor, then scraped out the foam core. Then i poured a thin bed of epoxy into the cutout area, set the phenolic blocks in it, and then filled up the voids around the edges of the blocks with thickened epoxy.

Last, I think I used 2 layers of 17oz biax glass over the block and overlapped the existing floor maybe 1.5" all around. Then used 3M marine filler to flush everything up, then sanded smooth and repainted.

Then just drill some pilot holes into the floor where the phenolic block is and use some stainless screws to fasten down whatever tie-downs you have.

There more info and pictures on my Gladesmen refurbish thread.
 

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I embedded 3/8" phenolic blocks into my cored floor.
See here ...https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013HQ6ZM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used a zip bit on my dremel to cut out the top layer of glass (about 1/8" to 3/16" thick) from the cored floor, then scraped out the foam core. Then i poured a thin bed of epoxy into the cutout area, set the phenolic blocks in it, and then filled up the voids around the edges of the blocks with thickened epoxy.

Last, I think I used 2 layers of 17oz biax glass over the block and overlapped the existing floor maybe 1.5" all around. Then used 3M marine filler to flush everything up, then sanded smooth and repainted.

Then just drill some pilot holes into the floor where the phenolic block is and use some stainless screws to fasten down whatever tie-downs you have.

There more info and pictures on my Gladesmen refurbish thread.
The other option, if you want to avoid cutting into the existing floor, is to epoxy and glass some phenolic blocks on top of the existing floor. Sand the edges to a smooth radius and then paint, and you can probably make it look pretty nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I embedded 3/8" phenolic blocks into my cored floor.
See here ...https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013HQ6ZM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used a zip bit on my dremel to cut out the top layer of glass (about 1/8" to 3/16" thick) from the cored floor, then scraped out the foam core. Then i poured a thin bed of epoxy into the cutout area, set the phenolic blocks in it, and then filled up the voids around the edges of the blocks with thickened epoxy.

Last, I think I used 2 layers of 17oz biax glass over the block and overlapped the existing floor maybe 1.5" all around. Then used 3M marine filler to flush everything up, then sanded smooth and repainted.

Then just drill some pilot holes into the floor where the phenolic block is and use some stainless screws to fasten down whatever tie-downs you have.

There more info and pictures on my Gladesmen refurbish thread.
Thanks man! I really appreciate it!
 

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Y'all are making this more complicated than necessary... as long as you have a floor - it doesn't matter if it's a bit thin - as long you use toggle bolts for your fasteners (since they spread out the load a couple of inches from your center point). Toggle bolts are what's normally used for blind installations (where you physically can't get to the underside of a deck or floor...). Check out any marine hardware catalog or store that sells pedestal seats and they'll have what's needed (the brand name Togglers...). I've used them to secure center consoles and other blind installations over the years with great, long-lasting results. Just make sure to buy one or two more than you need so you can do a practice installation with a couple pieces of scrap before using them on your boat... As long as the space under your deck has enough room for the toggles to swing out into position - you're good to go... Also make sure you only use toggle bolts meant for marine installations - outfits like Home Depot sell cheapies meant for use in houses - they're not suitable for boats...
 

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Doubt Minn Kota makes the toggler - they just use them a lot. Togglers have been the standard for any solid anchor work that will come under stress for blind installations for years and years.

The flimsy toggle bolts you see in home improvement stores, although not suitable for marine installations... are still good enough to be used as anchors for wall mounted big TV's, bookcases, etc.
 
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