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https://www.amazon.com/Scepter-6792...42961437&sprefix=20+gallon+gas,aps,136&sr=8-4

I used this on my last backcountry trip from Chokoloskee to lostmen's. I also brought a 5gallon jerry can with me that I didn't touch as a reserve. It lays flat inside my boat next to my livewell (similar weight to the livewell just being full) and takes up a little less space than 4 cans would. It is gravity fed, so It has to be higher than the gas tank when filling - which is a downside. That sucker is kind of heavy with 20 gallons of gas in it.

It is helpful around the house too. It keeps me from having the skiff on the highway as much. I will definitely be taking it with me on my next camping trip in a couple weeks.
 

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Back when I was in the Air Force we used fuel bladders for our fuel mobility unit. Practiced unloading fuel from small bladders in C-130's into giant bladders on the ground surrounded by dirt dikes. Assault landings in C-130's is terrifying but then fun once you realize you're not gonna die :LOL:

Also had only one really bad fire in my AF Fuel Specialist career as a result of a mobile pump backfiring after a hose bursting and subsequent emergency shutoff. That was an incredible pants shitting event to say the least, no one was hurt thank god. Yay fuel bladders!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
For perspective, I just returned from a camping trip to the Everglades. Boat (BT Mosquito with Yamaha F70, 15-gallon tank), was full on departure from Everglades City. We had a serious load of gear on the way out, fished hard for 2.5 days and carried a 5-gallon jerry can. I refilled the skiff and had gas left over in the can when we returned to the dock. At 4+ mpg or more with a four-stroke outboard, you have considerable range if you're not running WOT everywhere.
Makes sense. I have a 1998 yamaha 30hp 2-stroke and a 7gal tank. I just got back from a trip and I burned about 20gal total so had to bring 3 extra 5-6gal cans (actually carried 4 and used 3).
 

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I've used plastic barrels and ATL fuel bladders for both gas and diesel. Mind you we were fishing offshore making 110-150 mile runs out in big center consoles or sport fish boats or doing boat deliveries. I much preferred the bladders over the hard plastic barrels simply from a storage aspect. On the bigger boats, we had fuel manifold valves with quick connections so we could run out on the fuel bladder and once it was empty, switch the valve to main fuel tank. Once the bladders were empty, we folded them up, put them in their storage bags and stashed them. The single biggest drawback to bladders is cost. Proper fuel bladders are pricey compared to used plastic barrels. The same would apply for extra fuel cans; cheap but real estate hogs for storage.
On a skiff, I'd probably just use fuel cans. If you know your fuel burn/economy, its pretty easy to calculate how much fuel you'll use for the trip you are planning. Add 20-30% as a safety margin and figure out how much extra fuel you will need to carry. Once you've done the trip, you'll have a really good idea of what you actually need and you can fine tune your trip planning. If long range skiff trips are something you are thinking you might do often, then the value of a bladder is certainly increased.
 
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Hmmm
Back in the early 80’s we used a few plastic 5
35 gal drums to haul extra fuel in Midnight Express, Excalibur, and Cigarette boats off shore at night in the Miami and Ft Ladurdale areas......... don’t remember storing them for the ride back home. Maybe they took up to much valuable deck space. I don’t know, I was young......oppps
Did you meet Crocket and Tubbs?
 
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