First Time Rebuild - 1977 Wenzel 1400

Discussion in 'Bragging Spot' started by dleary46, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. dleary46

    dleary46 I Love microskiff.com!

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    A few weeks ago I started on my first rebuild. The boat is a 1977 Wenzel 1400 that I picked up for $500.  So far I have removed the old rotted transom, and replaced with Arjay Technologies Pourable Ceramic.

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    Inner transom skin removed. You can see how wet the plywood is...
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    After sanding and cleaning I installed the Arjay Pourable Transom. It would almost appear as if I know what I'm doing...
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Shicks007

    Shicks007 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Looking good! Starting to see a few Wenzels turning up. My son and I are remodeling one right now. Neat little boats. Good luck and keep the pictures coming :D
     

  3. dleary46

    dleary46 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Thanks 8Up! I've been keeping an eye on your build thread, but you haven't added anything recently... Are making any progress?
     
  4. Shicks007

    Shicks007 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Progress is slow. The weather has been awfully cold in Virginia. We do need to update the post though. Still learning a lot as we go. We have all the stern bulkheads fitted and glassed. What are your plans with your boat?
     
  5. dleary46

    dleary46 I Love microskiff.com!

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    The next step is laying up the transom. Then I will be removing both benches and the front deck, similar to what you have done. I bought 3/4" divinycell for stringers to support a false floor. The false floor, bulkheads and casting decks will all be made with 3/4" nidacore.

    I am up in Southeastern PA, so I am having the same issues with the cold weather...
     
  6. kooker

    kooker I Love microskiff.com!

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    I wouldn't use Nidacore for the bulkheads. 
     
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  7. surferjman

    surferjman I Love microskiff.com!

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    i agree with kooker19 ^^^ id probably use a 1/2" high density core material of some type. light, strong, lasts...not very cheap unfortunately
     
  8. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

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    You dont need any core in your bulkheads. Mat, woven,matt,matt,woven.  Save youre money.

    Also you dont need Divynal in your stringers.  Make them hollow and fill them with 2 lb pour foam.

    As far as cold weather goes you can buy winter mix resin or just put a little cobalt in your resin to help catalyze it faster. If its in the 40's mix at least 40cc's per gal MEKP in poly resin. If its below freezing I would use cobalt or mix 50cc's (Or lay everything up, close the shop and fire up a few propane heaters.)
     
  9. surferjman

    surferjman I Love microskiff.com!

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    If you plan on doing finish work to the boat. Don't put a woven on the outside, finish with a otter mat. Mat woven mat woven mat. You'll use a ton of primer filling that woven pattern. If you're not gonna do finish work then it doesn't matter
     
  10. dleary46

    dleary46 I Love microskiff.com!

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    I guess I could use the divinycell for the bulkheads, and the nidacore for the false floor and casting decks...  I have already ordered 90% of the material, and it has all been ordered from FL and shipped, so returning it isn't feasible.

    As for the heat I've gotten around that with a propane heater.  Had the garage up to 80 deg. for the transom pour.  But I can't do any sanding inside the garage. I have to roll the boat outside for that.

    As far as making the stringers hollow and filling them with 2lb pour foam, I have no idea where to even begin... My other concern is that I have a buddy that weighs about 280, and I'm petrified about what he could do to a weak deck or floor...

    And just out of curiosity, why not use nidcore for the bulkheads?  Is there any issue besides the cost?

    Thanks for all of the input! Please keep it coming because I am learning as I go...
     
  11. kooker

    kooker I Love microskiff.com!

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    Nidacore isn't good for vertical support. I guess the best example I could use that's kind of close would be taking a tire that has no rim and sitting on it while its vertical. The tire will bend but if you were to take a tire, lay it flat but put a very thin sheet of ply wood over it, the tire won't bend and it will hold your weight much better. I may be wrong but I think that's a close comparison haha.

    divinycell is good for vertical support (bulkheads), Nidacore (Floors, decks, any other horizontal piece)
     
  12. Shicks007

    Shicks007 I Love microskiff.com!

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    For what it's worth, We are using 1/2" Divinycell and 1708 for the bulkheads. Those panels are quite strong. I have had some issues getting a good bond. I have made a post on here and the guys have made some great suggestions im going to try. We are going to use 2lb pourable foam for structural support under the decks.
     
  13. trplsevenz

    trplsevenz I Love microskiff.com!

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    Nidacore is fine for bulkheads in a skiff. Hell alot of manufacturers do as Cwright said and just lay glass up on a bulkhead mold. I'd rather use the divinycell in the deck anyhow. easier to plug for screw fillers.
     
  14. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

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    Either will work.  The Divynal is stronger in shear than the Nida is so I would use the divynal for decks and Nida for bulkheads if your going to core them. 

    Getting divynal to bond properly without vacuum baging is tough.  but when done properly is super strong.  Here is how I do it without baging.  Mix 3M microbaloons and resin together until it is slightly less viscous than peanut butter.  Lay your divynal cell with the scored side up op over a 55 gal drum to open up all the scores. 

    Lay your glass intoyour deck mold and roll out all the air.

    While you are doing this have someone else take a cup of dark colored gelcoat pour it into your microbaloon putty and then drop in your catalyst.  The gelcoat is to show you when you have thoroughly mixed the catalyst.  once mixed use a 6" putty knife to smear the mixture all over the divynal cell laying upside down on the drum filling all the voids. 

    Then the two of you pick up the divynal and lay it down on the wet glass in the deck mold.   You only get one shot to do this.  as soon as it is laid down you cannot move it or you will mess up the glass on your mold.  Use your air roller to roll the matt down as hard as you can then throw some visqueen or a tarp ofer it and stack sand bags on it to hold it down to cure. 

    Once it cures prep the top of the divynal and lay glass over the top side of the divynal.
     
  15. dleary46

    dleary46 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Finally got my skiff finished back in May... and I completely forgot to post pics of the final result! I hope you guys like it!
     

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  16. Finn Maccumhail

    Finn Maccumhail I Love microskiff.com!

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    That is really cool dude. Came out great.
     
  17. devrep

    devrep Well-Known Member

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    came out great! Where did you get the grab bar?
     
  18. Tonyskiff

    Tonyskiff Active Member

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    Hey she came out awesome! Where did you get polling platform like that? Thanks!