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Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon Microskiff family,

After 6 months of extensive research and stalking this forum, I believe I will finally pull the trigger on my first-micro skiff. I’ll be purchasing a 2015 skimmer 14,6 with a brand new tiller Yami f25. Boat is equipped with 55lb thrust Co-Pilot, push pole, carbon marine tiller extender and GPS. I have grown up in Miami my entire life and finally saved up enough cash after my first year of full-time work to afford my first boat. After 16 years of fishing from the shore in BB and catching peacock bass and largemouth, I am pumped to get on the water. I’ve always been itching to get out into ENP and take advantage of exploring the gem we have here at our disposal.

I was hoping to get some insight from some veterans to the forum to avoid making any major mistakes while navigating through Flamingo and inshore Biscayne Bay. Let me start off by saying that this forum has been a blessing and the threads posted daily have contained some incredible advice!

I am looking to primarily fish Flamingo by trailering the boat to the ramp. From what I’ve been reading, I am limited to the back bays and flats on the front-side due to boat and engine power. Are runs across Whitewater Bay tin oyster or Shark feasible with this setup? Should I hug the shorelines? Boat currently has a 6gal tank but will be looking to purchase larger for the future.

Any beginner fishing/boating tips or advice would be great! I have quickly become addicted to the forum and will answer PM’s quickly.

Thanks for reading guys!
 

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There are days that Florida bay is flat calm and you can run where ever you feel comfortable. On the inside Whitewater bay can be quite rough at times, when it is, take Joe river around the western edge of Whitewater bay.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response Bassmaster. I appreciate it!

Edit from original due to typo: “whitewater bay to oyster...”
 

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Buy the charts, if you haven't already, and pick your days. Pack lots of water and food and explore! On falling tides, be mindful of how far away "deep water" is, getting stuck isn't very fun
 

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That setup is plenty capable. My buddy ran 2 days and 90 miles last fall in his 13ft NMZ with a 9.9hp, no problems! He's crazy though. Bring an extra 5 gallon fuel tank just in case, have a couple of flares and an air horn, and both digital and printed maps
 

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I was a guide in the keys but primarily Flamingo for over 20 years. Your skiff will do fine. Here is what I recommend. watch your weather. Start close and work your way farther each time. Always fish at least one to two new areas each time you go. concentrate on fishing points and gaps that have current flow. This will be your ambush points for snook and reds. As you work your way into Oyster bay again work current edges for big tarpon and snook. The points will hold grouper snapper and jewfish. Full moons are a death warrant down there. Yes you can still catch fish but it will be more challenging. Also keep a log book. When you find something write it down and then start comparing what things are common. over time you will be able to recognize patterns and set up for them
As a guide I would look at my weather and salinity levels then draw a straight line in my mental chart and fish every point and pass in it. It pays off. Remember fishing Flamingo is an adventure. cherish that thought. once you do the catch will become just icing on the cake. As for out front the same rules apply as they do for most other flats areas. Enter and leave quietly and protect the fishing areas and they will take care of you. If I can help more shoot me a message.
 
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