first bulkhead ever made! close enough to cut?

Discussion in 'Boat Yard Basics' started by racer04, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    I think this should be close enough to trace and cut on nida core, what's the viewers thoughts?
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    ::)
     
  2. NoeSmyrnaBch

    NoeSmyrnaBch Well-Known Member

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    It's close for sure. Check that left side a little, and make sure you get the top even with sides of the hull and totally level.

    Looks good though, nice work.
     

  3. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

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    looks good, but you dont need nida core for a buikhead. Just lay up 2 layers 1.5 oz chop strand mattes and 2 layers of woven roving.

    The bulkheads on my Fowl River 16 build in the bragging section have that layup and they are more than sufficient.

    You will need the Nida or divynal for the top deck though.
     
  4. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    what would I lay the glass on to make it straight though? and I already purchased and cut nida core for front bulk head
     
  5. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    excuse the construction material and new door in the backround lol
    [​IMG]

    back bulk head 80% done just need a filler piece for middle and cut it level on top. note cards are really helping me fill up little gaps also my friend told me bout them and it works good to fill it perfectly if you want to get a crazy perfect fit
     
  6. firecat1981

    firecat1981 BBA Counselor

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    You can use the nidacore as a form and heavily glass around it for the bulkheads, but it won't be adding any real strength which is why CW is suggesting the straight glass. Foam core would be a better option, or even good marine ply. To make the glass straight you can do the layup on your garage floor, put down a few layers of heavy plastic drop cloth, and make sure it is smooth. When done one side will be smoother and thats the one you face outward, the rougher side will be out of site when done.

    To be honest I'm not a fan of woven roving, it's used to add bulk more then strenght. I'd rather go with several layers of biaxial 1708 to 2408, but thats just me.
     
  7. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Hmmmm...1708 and 2408 are woven roving with a layer of 8 oz mat stitched to it.
    In polyester resin work, alternating layers of 18 to 24 oz woven roving and 3/4 oz mat
    are used to quickly lay up a hull to the needed thickness. So the 1708 and 2408 are
    simply a way to get the same effect with fewer cuts, and use epoxy instead of polyester.
    Mat is the weaker/filler material, roving is where the strength comes from.
     
  8. firecat1981

    firecat1981 BBA Counselor

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    Brett this is the first time in years I am going to disagree with you, 1708 and 2408 are stitched biaxial with a layer of mat attached, completely different then woven roving which is a heavy weight woven cloth. Yes they are used to build thickness and bulk, but in the same respect you can you any material and if you make it thick enough it will be strong. Also most of them are made for polyester, but some can be used with epoxy.
     
  9. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    No worries FC. I enjoy a little discussion in the morning over coffee.
    Biax 17 and 24 are just strands of fiberglass roving (17 oz and 24 oz per square yard)
    stitched together at a 90 degree angle to each other and aligned to the roll so it makes a 45 degree pattern.
    Woven roving uses those same strands of 17-24 oz fiberglass interwoven at a 90 degree angle
    with the weave running in the same direction as the roll. Same materials, same 90 degree overlap,
    the difference is how is comes off the roll. Nothing says you can't lay woven roving across a panel
    to obtain the same 45 degree alignment.

    Take a close look at the strands of roving in the biax

    http://www.raka.com/Stitched_woven_biaxial_triaxial.html

    and the strands in the woven roving

    http://store.raka.com/18ozx50in.aspx

    Rotate the woven 45 degrees and you end up with the same stuff.
    2 layers of heavy fiberglass roving intended for bulk layup to save time
    in a commercial setting.
     
  10. firecat1981

    firecat1981 BBA Counselor

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    Not disagreeing with most of that, but it's the interwoven part that sets them apart and I would rather not have in a heavier fabric. Woven is easier to use for hull layups, but we are talking about a flat panel here which should give little challenge. Really my preference would be to go with straight biaxial without the mat flanked with some 6oz cloth, but that would add a lot to cost.

    You see why I like working with wood now, lol ;D
     
  11. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

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    If you have already cut the Nida, then just use it.

    I bought a piece of Formika countertop material at lowes and glued it to a sheet of plywood and layed all my stuff up on it.  I made a right angle shape and layed the decks.  Then I cut my deck mold up and shaped it to make the center console mold.   Just wax it really good.    A hard high temperature wax is prefered,  but most of my parts, including my hull were pulled out using mcguires premium car wax.
     
  12. CurtisWright

    CurtisWright Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick Two.

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    also, both brett and fire are right.  Woven roving or biaxial will work.  They both have the same density of glass fibers, but biaxial costs a little more becasuse the layers are stitched together instead of woven. (more labor intensive)

    From my experience, the biaxial worked better on compound curves and draped a little easier.   I diddnt have to cut it as much making rounded shapes.   I used it in my hull.  But for flat parts i used woven because it was cheaper.   
     
  13. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    We'll I ended up getting 24 oz roven woven I'm going to use a layer directly on top of the nidacore... Or will that not bond? Also I was going to put 1 piece of 1 1/2 ounce chop mat on that I already cut the front bulk head... I wish I woulda posted this before to save me same money buy maybe I can salvage it and make it parts of my gunnels if I can join two pieces together? Also when I lay the bulk heads out on plastic over pliywood should I maybe add 6 inches to each side that I do not use resin on to make it to where I have something to glass into the floor and feather it in and sand it? Thank you for all the help
     
  14. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    Also I already made a bulk head so should I just cut the piece of glass that dries to that I'm not quite understanding why I wouldn't just glass the nida core in
     
  15. Recidivists

    Recidivists Looking towards the weekend!

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    Do you realize how difficult it is to follow your posts without giving up on them?  Slow down.  Proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling go a long way on a forum.  You're all over the place.

    Identify the subject, and then describe what you would like to do.  I guarantee that you would have received a plethora of responses earlier in this process if you could have communicated better.
     
  16. cutrunner

    cutrunner Cert. Yamaha technician

    He's trying to trype as fast as his mind thinks. I get it, I do the same thing and have to stop myself
     
  17. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    To many endless thoughts I need more details as to what they said about bulk heads and how they work pretty much
     
  18. NoeSmyrnaBch

    NoeSmyrnaBch Well-Known Member

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    Ok, so you have a bulk head glassed on both sides already, right?
     
  19. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    Exactly, that's why I like talking on the phone better lol.

    I have not glassed any bulk heads I just finish last night filling in where I cut the old seats out so now everything is even and flush. I have a bulkhead cut perfectly to the T for the bow I wanted to know what I should do next. I don't really understand how the laying out part goes after I lay the fiber glass on a smooth surface, how am I going to incorporate it in to the bottom of the boat? When I glass it on the ground do I just use the height of my bulk head and width of the boat then trace it to the bulkhead I've already made? then add material after to tie it into bottom floor of boat and top deck? I think that's where the grey area is.

    Once again I'll try to clarify better not good at online interactions I'll post pictures in a minute of what I have done so far to give you a better idea
     
  20. racer04

    racer04 Fly or die

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    [​IMG]

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    it may not look it but its all flush. just need to sand it tonight. going to play with the back deck I already made and strengthen it up with a layer of roven woven and mat.