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Oh, bout’ time for that next booster!
 

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Carpe Diem
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You are just a smart ass that “thinks” he knows all about all! Who gives a shit what anyone else is doing? A used tunnel will cost no more than a used no tunnel and he already has an upper hand in that when he realizes he wants/needs a tunnel he already has one to rig out from there. But hey, WTF do I know about boats and the Nature Coast?
If you need to use insults to make your point, you're obviously short of evidence. Here's a drill that will provide some. Go to CL and do a search on the Nature Coast for tunnel hulls with poling platforms for less than $10,000 and let us know what you find. To save a little time, I can tell you that as of this morning, there were none.
 

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If you need to use insults to make your point, you're obviously short of evidence. Here's a drill that will provide some. Go to CL and do a search on the Nature Coast for tunnel hulls with poling platforms for less than $10,000 and let us know what you find. To save a little time, I can tell you that as of this morning, there were none.
there you go with your virtue signaling. The insult was not to make my point about skiffs or fishing the Nature Coast. The insult was simply stating the truth that you are an ass. That said… who cares what anyone else is doing? Fish how you want to fish and buy the boat that best suits those needs is my point. Sure, a no tunnel boat will work. But… if he wants to spend his money wisely and be able to upgrade easily a used tunnel alumacraft, duracraft, sea ark, etc… will fit the bill perfectly and when he decides a tunnel is best for accessing the shallow waters we have here… he’ll already have it! As far as skiffs go with poling platforms ready to go for >$10k goes… lately you ain’t finding one worth buying for those prices and CL is outdated and not many people actually using these days compared to market place and other platforms.
 

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Carpe Diem
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Forgive my boating ignorance, but what are the advantages to having a tunnel boat?
The main advantage of a tunnel hull is that once a boat is on plane the motor can be raised (if a jack plate is installed) so that the boat can run in shallower water. A tunnel hull is a great advantage in areas with miles and miles of unobstructed sandy flats where the water may be a foot or less deep. On the Nature Coast, the water can be shallow, but it is never unobstructed. Running at high speed over an unfamiliar shallow area can frequently result in a collision with a submerged limestone rock, thus running at speed with a tunnel is less of an advantage here. On the Nature Coast, the best policy is only to run at speed in areas with which you are familiar, and most of these areas are deep enough (depending on tides) so that a tunnel is not really necessary. As a novice boater, your time and money would be better spent learning the territory and the basics of Nature Coast fishing and navigation than it would be spent on a tunnel and jack plate (which are not cheap).

I say all this after having owned and fished both tunnel hulls, jets, and conventional hulls for decades in this area and for over 70 years in Florida. I currently own a tunnel hulled Seaark with a Bob's jack plate, so you shouldn't conclude I'm against tunnels.
 

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Forgive my boating ignorance, but what are the advantages to having a tunnel boat?
A properly built tunnel boat will also have a raised transom so your engine is automatically mounted 4-6” or more higher than a non tunnel hull lessening your chances of striking an obstruction “even at no wake speeds”. Now, add a jack plate and low water pick up along with the right prop and you can pretty much get the entire skeg and prop above the hulls bottom! Now, don’t get me wrong as I am not a non tunnel nazi… I just like true and accurate information without bias as to what “everyone else” is doing. 😉
 

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Carpe Diem
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Although a tunnel transom may allow the motor to be mounted higher, to get onto plane a prop needs a certain amount of water over it to develop required thrust. Tunnel or not, that amount is the same. Just because the motor is mounted 4-6" higher does not mean that it won't have to be lowered 4-6" to get onto plane.
 

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Although a tunnel transom may allow the motor to be mounted higher, to get onto plane a prop needs a certain amount of water over it to develop required thrust. Tunnel or not, that amount is the same. Just because the motor is mounted 4-6" higher does not mean that it won't have to be lowered 4-6" to get onto plane.
MS fact checkers say this statement is FALSE! A tunnel hull with no jack plate properly built and rigged the engine sits the depth of the tunnel higher than a non tunnel and that sir is fact! If you can’t see that or have been running tunnels with your engine starting with cav plate level with the hull bottom from start that explains a lot!!! Starting with… you have no idea whatsoever how a tunnel works!
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
Sharp Hooks Matter
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Yeah, that must be it. All the guys poling and fly fishing are doing it in the dark and that's why we don't see them.

Seriously, 80% of the fishermen on the Nature Coast are using bait. 19.9% are artificial only, and maybe 0.1% are fly fishermen. The same ratios apply to poling.
Silly bullshit!
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
Sharp Hooks Matter
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Although a tunnel transom may allow the motor to be mounted higher, to get onto plane a prop needs a certain amount of water over it to develop required thrust. Tunnel or not, that amount is the same. Just because the motor is mounted 4-6" higher does not mean that it won't have to be lowered 4-6" to get onto plane.
Keep digging your hole...
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
Sharp Hooks Matter
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Although a tunnel transom may allow the motor to be mounted higher, to get onto plane a prop needs a certain amount of water over it to develop required thrust. Tunnel or not, that amount is the same. Just because the motor is mounted 4-6" higher does not mean that it won't have to be lowered 4-6" to get onto plane.
The tunnel creates the "higher" water you are talking about within the tunnel. Therefore, the motor can be higher in relation to the transom.
 

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Thanks for the help everyone! If anyone is in the area i’d love to meet up and catch some reds.
Keep me posted when you purchase one. I am in Tallahassee and will be back on the water in the spring. I don't have a boat, but my son and I go out fishing some on our Sea Doo FishPro. Don't tell anyone or they might boot me off here since some members on here don't like PWCs being mentioned on here..... We typically go out of Shell Point because the boat ramp is not as crazy as St. Marks.
 

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Carpe Diem
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The tunnel creates the "higher" water you are talking about within the tunnel. Therefore, the motor can be higher in relation to the transom.
The tunnel has no effect when at rest, and that's when you need the thrust to get out of the hole. Once underway, the tunnel does "create higher water", but you've got to get going first. You should know this.
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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You should stick to arguing about CNN statistics and virus porn. One of my skiff videos would debunk everything you are peddling here. I can perform a hole shot jacked up on 6 which is skeg even with the bottom of my hull and trimmed flat using only throttle and trim tabs no spinning up. If you want I can post this or you can take my word on it.
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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The difference is once a tunnel hull begins even the slowest forward movement hydrodynamics comes into effect and water immediately begins to form a column of water the prop can continue to produce thrust from without lowering the jackplate. Non tunnels can’t do this because they are flat all the way across and the outboard has to be lowered once it runs out of water to pull.
I will make a clip and post a link later.
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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Brilliant reply. Your factual and highly analytical response has definitely improved the tone of this thread.
All you do is spew nonsense and act like you know what you’re yapping about. Don’t forget that even fact checkers like yourself need to be fact checked. I am noticing a trend with you and I know I’m not the only one. You have posted enough lies and nonsense in this thread to prove my point. Fabricating false percentages and statistics...you do that on other topics as well.
 

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Good jo
I had about the same needs and less budget, but also want to run in creeks and rivers some, just to explore. I'm much older now and need something I can manhandle off sandbars and such by myself, since I'm always alone.

View attachment 192896

I was looking for a 14 ft tin boat and stumbled into a deal on a 16 ft Starcraft Seafarer that has a 63" beam (I measured it) and 20" freeboard. Yep, 20". That freeboard excited me - if I get caught out somewhere, I'd rather tough it out in my boat than a 22 ft bay boat.

The Starcraft weighs 286# bare, according to their specs and I can load it from the ground onto my trailer single handedly with no fuss - I've done it several times now.

It's got a 25 hp 2 smoke Johnson that gives almost 30 mph top speed and is easy on gas. I Would like a little more power but that's OK. Don't really need it and more power equals more weight.

Even with its' V hull design and nice entry, it'll almost float in spit and handles chop well. Aluminum is noisy and I learned the hard way, years ago, to keep it light.

With that in mind - and traction for my hind hoofs and my dog's claws - I just bought some regular no-nap indoor/outdoor carpet and stuck it down with spray adhesive.

Total weight about 2#. With the spray adhesive, it's easy to replace - with Henry's carpet glue, it's almost impossible.

It's still a tin boat and noisy but the carpet tones it down a lot.

I also built a folding grab bar for it and mounted the chart plotter and a small instrument panel on it.

Completely loaded, gassed up, legal, and ready to go but without me in it, I doubt it weighs 500#.

I would also like a flat floor, but can't have everything, I guess.

Before I fell into this one, I'd never heard of the Seafarer, but I'm very pleased with it. It compares very favorably with the Klamath and Bayrunner boats on the west coast. Light, rugged and seaworthy.
Good job! You made it the way you like it.
 

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Go
The optimum skiff for the areas the OP wants to fish is a 15 to 16 foot welded aluminum jon with a 25 to 50 hp motor. My first choice for starting out would be a G3 1548 VBW with a 25 hp outboard. I would not worry about tunnel hulls and jack plates since knowing where and when to go is more important here than just running shallow. Better to know where the rocks are and avoid them than to run in 6" and hit a rock 4" below the surface. Conditions on the Nature Coast are not very conducive to poling, so I wouldn't worry about poles and platforms to start. As experience and buying power is gained, bigger, more complicated rigs can be considered.
sound advice.
 
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