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I finally hit the hundred yesterday while wading so I had to brag a little. I have been able to cast 80-90 feet for a few years and was always frustrated that I couldn't quite dump all of my fly line. I have watched many youtube videos of 'how to fly cast 100 feet' and most of them have some really good advice but only seemed to have a few pieces of the puzzle. Lots of people showing off and not a good breakdown of the stroke.

If you can hit the hundred, what was your ah ha! moment/technique that broke the threshold for you? Try to give the advice you wish could have given yourself when trying to break 100 feet.
 

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If I had to cast that distance to fish I would practice distance but it would not be sight casting to camouflaged fish in less than two foot of water here in Texas. Even thirty foot cast may require lots of resets when the fish changes direction while your line is in the air on the way to the fish.
 

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If I had to cast that distance to fish I would practice distance but it would not be sight casting to camouflaged fish in less than two foot of water here in Texas. Even thirty foot cast may require lots of resets when the fish changes direction while your line is in the air on the way to the fish.
I totally agree there. Practice for application. While I don't ever intend at presenting a fly to a fish at 100 ft, I do it at 70 feet quite a bit. I'm willing to bet you could make a 30 foot cast much better than me! I tend to plop short casts like a depth charge, spooky reds love it. And by love it I mean they hate it....
 

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Accurate distance casting is certainly a good skill to have for some tarpon water and large, wide rivers full of steelhead/salmon, but in most cases accurate short range reset casting is a more useful skill.
 

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Not sure I'll ever be a 100' caster. But then most of my shots are under 70' unless I'm really reaching for tails. I'm good out to 70' on most days.

Honestly, my biggest challenge are the laid up reds that I don't see until well inside of 50'. And seeing those is tougher than casting to them...at least for me.
 
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What area do
I totally agree there. Practice for application. While I don't ever intend at presenting a fly to a fish at 100 ft, I do it at 70 feet quite a bit. I'm willing to bet you could make a 30 foot cast much better than me! I tend to plop short casts like a depth charge, spooky reds love it. And by love it I mean they hate it....
What area do you live?

The casting stroke is completely different when going to that distance than any type of rnormal fishing/casting strokes. It can be impractical to fish with, especially years worth of doing so. It can also be done improperly for long term shoulder health. Rotor cuffs can easily be torn that way, as well as forearm tendons, so be careful.

For me, I've had to go "out of the box" to get consistent with it and not wreck my shoulder. The real trick is going from a "perfect environment" of casting on a lawn or casting pond (whether indoors or outdoors), to real world casting where you are actually fishing with cast like that with winds and weather. Of course, having the right rod, flyline and flies does help. I see lots of pro casters using 5wts to do so. Try doing it with a 12 or 13wt while fishing! Not so fun! :eek: A friend of mine refers it to "hero casting" Lol ;)

So far one of the best and most consistent Florida fly casters is David Olson. I can only shake my head when he blows my doors off! :oops:

Ted Haas
3rd place - 2015 Big Gun Competition (missed 2nd and 1st place by inches)
5th place - 2016 Big Gun Competition (got my doors blown off by Dave Olsen!)
Min. entry qualification - 100ft. Then Competition using someone elses rod, not yours, with no practice to speak of.
 

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What area do

What area do you live?

The casting stroke is completely different when going to that distance than any type of rnormal fishing/casting strokes. It can be impractical to fish with, especially years worth of doing so. It can also be done improperly for long term shoulder health. Rotor cuffs can easily be torn that way, as well as forearm tendons, so be careful.
I live in Tampa and do mostly wade fishing. Majority of the time I will blind cast a fishy flat when I cant actually see the fish. A 70 ft cast is perfect as it covers a lot of ground and is easy for me to throw consistently. I agree that the distance cast has its differences but practicing to hit the hundred has greatly improved my overall stroke at any distance past 50 ft. For me it was fine tuning my double haul. Learning to let out more line in both directions during the haul, haul deeper and 180 degrees to the fly rod, and keep it to two false casts and shooting on my third forward stroke got me to break the 100. I apply these techniques to all my casts and has greatly increased every aspect of my fly fishing ability.
 

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I totally agree there. Practice for application. While I don't ever intend at presenting a fly to a fish at 100 ft, I do it at 70 feet quite a bit. I'm willing to bet you could make a 30 foot cast much better than me! I tend to plop short casts like a depth charge, spooky reds love it. And by love it I mean they hate it....
On those close shots You have to stop your rod tip up high and not dump it down all at once. Otherwise you end up with that line slap you were referencing. I'm guilty of it as well. It's one of those bad habits I find myself fighting frequently.
 

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On those close shots You have to stop your rod tip up high and not dump it down all at once. Otherwise you end up with that line slap you were referencing. I'm guilty of it as well. It's one of those bad habits I find myself fighting frequently.
That's especially challenging when my brain is screaming, "GET THAT FLY IN THE WATER ASAP OR YOU'RE GONNA MISS YOUR CHANCE!" I end up forcing it.

It's like golf. The harder you swing, the worse your shot.
 

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That's especially challenging when my brain is screaming, "GET THAT FLY IN THE WATER ASAP OR YOU'RE GONNA MISS YOUR CHANCE!" I end up forcing it. It's like golf. The harder you swing, the worse your shot.
Same here, it has been a hard habit for me to fix. My instinct is to drop the rod tip and dump the line as quick as possible in those short shots. I can't tell you how many fish I have blasted on the head in that situation.

I had to go in my backyard and make that situational cast hundreds of times for it to start to become part of my thought process.
 

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I had to go in my backyard and make that situational cast hundreds of times for it to start to become part of my thought process.
There is no substitute for this!^
The more time you put in, the more you get out.
 

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what wasn't mentioned yet, however, it's entirely dependent on the line you're using. I.e. I'd venture to say, most people can't shoot your average out-of-the-box redfish line into the backing, whereas other lines they me able to quite well.

Also - make sure your line isn't 120' as some are...that one threw me for a loop (no pun intended) a while ago..
 

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Do the distance casters underline their rods? I would imagine that would make it way easier to carry 70ft of line.
 

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Do the distance casters underline their rods? I would imagine that would make it way easier to carry 70ft of line.
Been wondering the same thing myself. Seems the "sweet spot" that rods are designed/spec'd to is around the 50-60 foot carry range for your average line (figure in another 20-30' to shoot for a 70-90' cast). Rod isn't really designed to carry much more weight than that, so one would think if you drop down a line weight or two (quickness would decrease, obviously) and you should theoretically be able to carry more line.

Definitely no physics expert, but this one has had me thinking for a while. Haven't ever tried going down a line weight...most of my rods are at-weight or overweighted by one to help me fish windier conditions.
 

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what wasn't mentioned yet, however, it's entirely dependent on the line you're using. I.e. I'd venture to say, most people can't shoot your average out-of-the-box redfish line into the backing, whereas other lines they me able to quite well.
x 2 on this. I thought I was doing ok with some basic rio redfish line on a used reel a bought a few years ago. Then I put SA Mastery Bonefish on my new reel (same rod) and it's night and day different. I'm an average fly flinger, but I feel like a pro throwing that SA line.
 

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Good to be able to throw farther if you wade a lot. You're already handicapped by the height of the water. Add tall grass and a back cast carrying 40 ft on bare floor gets hung up quick.
 
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